Articles about View

New booze guidelines: We'd rather you didn't enjoy yourselves

New alcohol advice published today reiterates that the recommended maximum intake weekly for male adults should fall from 21 to 14 units - barely enough to fill a bowl with electric soup*. “To keep health risks from alcohol to a low level it is safest not to drink more than 14 units a week on a regular basis,” the guidelines …
Andrew Orlowski, 26 Aug 2016
This dual view of Jupiter was taken on August 23, when NASA’s Juno spacecraft was 2.8 million miles (4.4 million kilometers) from the gas giant planet on the inbound leg of its initial 53.5-day capture orbit. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS

Juno probe to graze Jupiter on Saturday

Strap in for a bumpy ride, Earthlings: the Juno probe will make its closest approach to Jupiter on Saturday when it comes within just 4,200km of the gas giant's uppermost clouds. Juno made it to Jupiter in early July but was busy entering orbit and fiddling with its rockets so didn't do much more than shoot some rather nice …
Simon Sharwood, 26 Aug 2016
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Muddying the waters of infosec: Cyber upstart, investors short medical biz – then reveal bugs

Analysis A team of security researchers tipped off an investment firm about software vulnerabilities in life-preserving medical equipment in order to profit from the fallout. Researchers at MedSec Holdings, a cybersecurity startup in Miami, Florida, found numerous holes in pacemakers and defibrillators manufactured by St Jude Medical. …
Iain Thomson, 26 Aug 2016
Mobile adverts

Google tells popup ads to p*** off on mobes

Google will be rejigging its search algorithm to downgrade websites that slap up a large advert, aka an "interstitial," before readers can actually get to see the content. On January 10, the Chocolate Factory will start scanning websites for interstitials and, if they break the recommended guidelines, they'll be kicked down …
Iain Thomson, 24 Aug 2016

Irritable Cisco kicks Nutanix out of partner program

Dis is not welcome so we're going to diss it. That's Cisco's view, in a nutshell, of Nutanix jumping on its UCS servers as a means of selling its hyper-converged system software into the Cisco customer base and channel. A source in the channel slipped us an email Cisco sent to some of its partners – here's the crucial portion …
Chris Mellor, 24 Aug 2016
Crystal ball. Pic: Shutterstock

Gartner's Magic Quadrant mages shake crystal ball, Violin goes topsy turvy

Gartner's latest all-flash array Magic Quadrant contains expected news, a few surprises and a demotion that has prompted a public response from Violin Memory. The report, Gartner's 2016 Solid State Arrays Magic Quadrant and Critical Capabilities" report, can be accessed by Gartner subscribers here. The Magic Quadrant (MQ) …
Chris Mellor, 24 Aug 2016

False Northern Lights alert issued to entire UK because of a lawnmower

An alert that the Northern Lights would be visible across all of Great Britain last night was wrongly issued because a sit-on lawnmower disturbed scientific instruments. Subscribers to the AuroraWatch UK mailing list were sent a “Red Alert” yesterday; informing them that it would be possible to view the aurora borealis from …
Priest, image via Shutterstock

MySQL daddy Widenius: Open-source religion won't feed MariaDB

Interview MySQL daddy Monty Widenius has dismissed claims the MariaDB fork is veering away from open source. Rather, the chief technology officer of MariaDB corporation called his firm’s embrace of a commercial licence for part of MariaDB "critical" to delivering new revenue and for the continued development of open-source software. …

Stop lights, sunsets, junctions are tough work for Google's robo-cars

Hot Chips After cruising two million miles of public roads, Google's self-driving cars still find traffic lights, four-way junctions and other aspects of everyday life hard work. To be sure, the hardware and software at the heart of the autonomous vehicles is impressive. But it's just not quite good enough yet to be truly let loose on …
Chris Williams, 24 Aug 2016

EU ministers look to tighten up privacy – JUST KIDDING – surveillance laws

European ministers are debating a clampdown on encryption and a further increase in surveillance in response to mounting terrorist threats. Bernard Cazeneuve, France’s interior minister is due to meet his German counterpart, Thomas de Maizere, to discuss possible regulations to limit the use of encrypted communications across …
John Leyden, 23 Aug 2016

The TPC-C/SPC-1 storage benchmarks are screwed. You know what we need?

Comment The storage benchmarking world is broken because there are no realistic and pratical storage benchmarks with realistic workloads customers can apply to systems. So says storage analyst Howard Marks, and he aims to fix this mess with the help of a consortium of industry players. He says the world of storage …
Chris Mellor, 23 Aug 2016

Beardy Ed Vaizey: 'I can't let go. I like the tech sector'

Interview One month after Theresa May swept into government, former culture and digital minister Ed Vaizey is relatively sanguine about getting the sack. "The reason for me not being in my job is due to political reasons ... I didn't have perhaps enough credentials for her [sic] to stay in my post or even stay in government. Others did …
Kat Hall, 23 Aug 2016

Google to block web views from using its OAuth

Google's decided that web-views should no longer be able to use OAuth requests, and is deprecating them in Android, iOS, Windows and OS X as of October. What that means is that while (for example) Android's embedded browser will be able to handle OAuth requests, third party app logins won't be able to use web-views for OAuth …

Fujitsu: Why we chose 64-bit ARM over SPARC for our exascale super

Hot Chips Fujitsu chose 64-bit ARM CPU cores for its upcoming exascale supercomputer for two reasons: Linux and the ability to customize its own processors. It was a bit of a surprise when the Japanese IT giant picked ARMv8-A over SPARC64 and x86 for its Post-K beast, which will be used by Japanese boffins to carry out climate-change …
Chris Williams, 23 Aug 2016

'Neural network' spotted deep inside Samsung's Galaxy S7 silicon brain

Hot Chips Samsung has revealed the blueprints to its mystery M1 processor cores at the heart of its S7 and S7 Edge smartphones. International versions of the top-end Android mobiles, which went on sale in March, sport a 14nm FinFET Exynos 8890 system-on-chip that has four standard 1.6GHz ARM Cortex-A53 cores and four M1 cores running at …
Chris Williams, 22 Aug 2016
Millennials snap pics of their food with smartphones for Facebook/Twitter/instagram. Photo by shutterstock

Honor 8: Huawei targets millennials with high-spec cheapie. 3 words – Food pic mode

Hands on Huawei might be the third biggest smartphone seller on the planet but it has very little traction outside Asia. The Chinese firm is hoping the Honor 8 will change that. The handset, which was launched in the US last week and will be formally launched in Europe at an event in Paris on Wednesday, is being aimed firmly at the …
Iain Thomson, 22 Aug 2016
Cell tower, view from below. Image by Shutterstock.com

LTE-U’s window is closing and bigger 5G disputes may be coming

One of the presumed outcomes of the 5G process is full convergence of licensed and unlicensed spectrum, with one or more air interface standards which can span both, using frequencies entirely flexibly according to requirement. This is a very long way off, if the current quarrels over extending LTE into licence-exempt bands are …
Wireless Watch, 22 Aug 2016
The "sand telescope"

Radio astronomy pioneer dies at 92

One of the pioneers of Australian radio astronomy, Owen Bruce Slee, has died in Australia aged 92. Once part of a team whose work brought conflict with famous British astronomer Sir Fred Hoyle, Slee had just been honoured by the International Astronomical Union, which named Minor Planet 9391 Slee after him. In the 1950s, …

Microsoft’s Continuum: Game changer or novelty?

Hands On Microsoft’s Continuum is one of the spookiest computing experiences you can have. Either plug a phone into a dock, or turn on a nearby wireless display and keyboard, and the phone doubles up as an ersatz Windows PC. No more lugging a laptop around. Back in January, we described Continuum reviewers as sharing the surprise and …
Andrew Orlowski, 19 Aug 2016
Smartphone user photo via Shutterstock

iPhone: Apple's Mac battle with Windows rebooted

Apple under Tim Cook has delivered six new makes of iPhone, with a further four derivations based on the overall brand. The future, according to Cook this week, looks an awful lot like Apple’s recent past – especially if you happen to live in India, which is the new China in terms of tech firms looking to tap a vast and …
Gavin Clarke, 19 Aug 2016
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Apple beats off banks' bid for access to iPhones' NFC chips

Apple has had a partial win in its attempt to prevent banks using iPhones' NFC chips for payment services other than Apple Pay. Four Australian banks applied to local regulators to bargain with Apple as a cartel. Apple argued against their application by claiming iThings' security would be badly compromised by allowing third- …
Simon Sharwood, 19 Aug 2016
Robots with Cursors from Shutterstock

Oracle Java copyright war latest: Why Google's luck is about to run out

Analysis Oracle says one of the foundations of Google's legal victory in the Java API copyright trial has exploded – and that means a retrial is needed. Oracle was trying its luck in court yesterday, demanding a retrial – although regardless of its success in forcing a third trial, the outcome of the second trial is on course to be …
Andrew Orlowski, 18 Aug 2016
Man looks at his mobile - mildly surprised or shocked about something. Photo by shutterstock

Atlassian promises frictionless, casual video encounters

Atlassian is adding group video to its HipChat service, but has promised that you can can hit the red button on overeager “collaborators”. For now, anyway. The collaboration vendor has had one-to-one video in its HipChat product for a couple of years, but has reconfigured the service on the Jitsi technology it hoovered up last …
Joe Fay, 18 Aug 2016
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PayPal patches 2FA portal bug

PayPal has patched a two-factor authentication (2FA) bug that could have let an attacker bypass its login processes. Turned up by Vulnerability Labs' Shawar Khan, the problem existed in how PayPal's API implemented the “PayPal preview” portal. The good news is that it was an exploit that needed access to the victim's browser …
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GDS Verify head Janet Hughes steps down

Janet Hughes, the head of the government's much-delayed identity assurance scheme GOV.UK Verify, is stepping down. In a blog post announcing the move, Hughes said it was time for the team to change and "for me to move on to new challenges, so I’m going to be leaving the Government Digital Service on Friday, 19 August." Jess …
Kat Hall, 16 Aug 2016
Oculus Rift

Oculus Rift will reach UK in September – and will cost more than two PS4s

If you don't particularly enjoy reality then you can look forward to not particularly enjoying virtual reality when the Oculus Rift headset reaches UK retailers in September. While the headset may not quite be the miserable simulacra Jean Baudrillard wrote of, its expected retail price of around £549, as well as the necessity …

Grindr rolls out New Relic in ‘comprehensive lifestyle’ push

Grindr is rolling out New Relic’s platform into its production environment as it looks to become a fully fledged “comprehensive lifestyle resource” for gay men and the men who want to meet them. The hookup app turned lifestyle resource has been using New Relic's software analytics platform in its dev operation. The dating …
Clodagh Doyle, 16 Aug 2016

WD: Resistance is not futile

Analysis WD, with its acquired SanDisk operation, is squaring up to Intel and Micron’s XPoint with ReRAM - Resistive RAM technology. Back in October last year, the then independent SanDisk joined forces with HPE to fight XPoint. The two signed an agreement to develop Storage-Class Memory (SCM*), a non-volatile storage medium with DRAM- …
Chris Mellor, 16 Aug 2016
Woman at gym lifts weights with arms. Photo by Shutterstock

HPE StoreVirtual gets low-cost ARM-powered variant

HPE has lowered prices for its SMB storage array customers by building an ARM-powered StoreVirtual array, eschewing X86 CPUs, and by bundling some previously optional components into an MSA 2042 product version. The StoreVirtual 3200, which has a starting price of just over $6,000, has two active:active controllers with …
Chris Mellor, 15 Aug 2016
Tim Cook, photo2 by JStone via Shutterstock

Tim Cook's answer to crashing iPhone sales: More iPhones

Apple’s plan to tackle the great iPhone sales slump is for it to produce, yes, more iPhones. CEO Tim Cook, in a scripted Q&A with the Washington Post, dismissed the six-month drop-off in sales of iPhones – and slowing smartphone sales in general. Apple is now expected to release the iPhone 7 in September. Cook reckons …
Gavin Clarke, 15 Aug 2016
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Someone in Australia wants server sales hidden from view

Someone has successfully applied to hide data on CPU and/or server imports to Australia in June 2016. The Australian Bureau of Statistics' new Confidential Commodities List for July 2016 lists “Digital processing units whether or not presented with the rest of the system which may contain storage units, input units or output …
Simon Sharwood, 15 Aug 2016
A view from Babbage's eye-mounted Picam

First FreeBSD 11.0 rc lands

Daemon-wranglers, draw your pentagrams; crash test dummies, strap on the helmet: the FreeBSD project has announced the first release candidate in its version 11.0 cycle is available for download. As well as the usual installation images, there are virtual machine FreeBSD 11.0 images for AMD and i386; Amazon EC2 images and …
Sprint

Pivot3 positions itself for possible IPO

Is an IPO being planned? Hyper-converged system supplier Pivot3 says it had record growth in the first half of 2016, with a 103 per cent revenue increase and more than 400 new customers, and has hired a new CFO. Bill Stover has been appointed Pivot3's finance head. Mike Dansby was the prior CFO, serving from June 2014 to July …
Chris Mellor, 13 Aug 2016
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Seagate's flash advice: Don't buy the foundry when you can get the chips for cheap

Analysis As well as launching several new flash products, Seagate revealed the four pillars of its flash product strategy at the August 9-11 Flash Memory Summit in Santa Clara. These were: Foundry independence Essential IP for system-wide use of flash Portfolio expansion Top-level cloud supplier Let's have a waltz around the …
Chris Mellor, 12 Aug 2016

Hey, turn down that radio, it's alien season and we're hunting aliens

Some clever folks have started an experiment that will hunt for signs of alien civilisations using the Murchison Widefield Array – a low frequency radio telescope in western Australia. Eggheads at Curtin University, Down Under, and the Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica in Italy, have published a paper outlining the experiment …
Katyanna Quach, 12 Aug 2016
E8 Array

Software-defined storage is glitzy, but E8 and Nimbus are still delivering hardware

Comment Despite all the recent noise around software-defined storage (SDS), vendors still keep coming to the market with new hardware solutions. Over the past weeks we’ve seen new products from Nimbus Data and emerging startup E8. Nimbus Nimbus Data has had what can only be called a ‘chequered’ history. My first introduction to the …
Chris Evans, 12 Aug 2016
Game of Thrones

Boffins' blur-busting face recognition can ID you with one bad photo

Scientists have found a way to accurately identify completely obscured faces using recognition systems trained on only a handful of well-lit photos. The work by Seong Joon Oh, Rodrigo Benenson, Mario Fritz, and Bernt Schiele of Max Planck Institute in Saarbrücken, Germany, finds faces can be recognised with up to 91.5 per cent …
Darren Pauli, 12 Aug 2016
Monty Python sketch: Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition

Nobody expects... a surprise haemorrhoid operation

Decades of authoritarian one party rule have perhaps reduced one man's ability to question authority as a Chinese bloke awaiting the birth of his child was erroneously whisked in for a haemorrhoidectomy. Doctors at Shenyang Hunnan Xinqu Hospital mistook Mr Wang for another chap with a bad case of the pink grapes and whisked …
Paul Kunert, 11 Aug 2016

Mangstor tells IT managers: Hey SANshine, c'mon in, the fabric is fine

Mangstor says it has found a way to bring iSCSI and Fibre Channel SANs into the NVME over Fabrics array era – an era which kills their network latency access penalty. Paul Prince, Mangstor CTO, says: "Existing SANs based on FC or iSCSI have very high latencies which limit the performance of today’s high performance …
Chris Mellor, 10 Aug 2016
A 56k dial-up modem

ISP roundup: Google mulls fiber-less Fiber, America goes Wow, Comcast still terrible

A flurry of news from internet service providers (ISPs) in the US has picked up what is normally a slow summer season. According to a report from the San Jose Mercury News, Google's planned rollout of its Fiber broadband service in the Bay Area has hit a snag, as the Chocolate Factory is considering a change of course. The …
Shaun Nichols, 09 Aug 2016
Super-villain Dr Evil puts finger to lip in scheming manner, asks for one million dollars. Pic: New Line Cinema

Australia's online Census collapses, international hackers blamed

The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) says the problems that emerged with its online services yesterday were caused by international denial-of-service attacks. The ABS has been facing criticism since early on August 9, because of the repeated failure of its IBM SoftLayer-hosted online census. IBM has been putting the …

Google Chrome will beat Flash to death with a shovel: Why... won't... you... just... die!

By the end of the year, Google Chrome will block virtually all Flash content and make whatever's left click-to-play by default. In September, Chrome 53 will kill off all background Flash content, which is about 90 per cent of Flash on the web, according to Google. Then in December, Chrome 55 will use HTML5 for video, …
Shaun Nichols, 09 Aug 2016
A view from Babbage's eye-mounted Picam

Micron smartphone flashery

Micron has got itself 32GB, 32-layer, 3D NAND smartphone flash chips. The chips support the Universal Flash Storage (UFS) 2.1 standard and are for high-end and mid-range smartphones. The UFS 2.1 support should mean good sequential read performance. Hopefully smartphones using these chips get more storage and can keep more …
Chris Mellor, 09 Aug 2016
Police Scotland employees stand outside the Scottish Parliament. Pic: Shutterstock

Police Scotland to cough 0.001% of annual income for unlawful RIPA spying

Police Scotland has been ordered to pay a Scottish policeman-turned-novelist £10,000 in damages after being found guilty of abusing surveillance powers to hunt down sources who blew the whistle on a bungled murder enquiry. The Investigatory Powers Tribunal published its judgment yesterday. Although five people filed claims …
Gareth Corfield, 09 Aug 2016
ExaFlash D-Series

ExaFlash: Cheap, dense, energy-sipper will 'empower humankind'

+Comment Nimbus Data has announced its scale-out ExaFlash all-flash array at the Flash Memory Summit, with four models ranging up to 4.5PB raw capacity in 4U. The claims are pretty big and prompt the question: "Is this for real?" Nimbus' overall claims for ExaFlash start from scale and rackspace density and ultimately encompass " …
Chris Mellor, 09 Aug 2016

BBC detector vans are back to spy on your home Wi-Fi – if you can believe it

Updated The BBC's creepy detector vans will be dragged into the 21st century to sniff Brits' home Wi-Fi networks, claims the UK Daily Telegraph's Saturday splash. From September 1, you'll need a telly licence if you stream catch-up or on-demand TV from the BBC's iPlayer service, regardless if you've got a television set or not – phone …
Chris Williams, 06 Aug 2016
space view of australia in arty green

New boss at .au helm

The company that manages Australia's .au top-level domain, AuDA, has named its new CEO. Cameron Boardman is a lifelong civil servant who was most recently head of investor engagement at the jobs department of an Australian state government. He also has cybersecurity experience, having started up a number of cybersecurity …
Kieren McCarthy, 04 Aug 2016

'ICANN's general counsel should lose his job over this'

Interview It has been four years since Shaul Jolles, as CEO of Dot Registry, filed applications for five new internet extensions – .corp, .inc, .llc, .llp and .ltd – and wrote a check for just under $1m to have them considered by domain name system overseer ICANN. Unlike the other applicants for the three US corporate entity suffixes . …
Chris Williams, 04 Aug 2016
David Scott of HP

Gone Goel: HPE changes storage leadership

Comment It was recently reported that Manish Goel, HPE’s head of storage, had left the company. This seems to be one of a number of changes, including the departure of cloud head Bill Hilf. Although I didn’t meet him directly, Goel presented to the bloggers/influencers at the latest HPE Discover event in Las Vegas. Goel took over …
Chris Evans, 04 Aug 2016
Prison

Londoner jailed after refusing to unlock his mobile phones

A London man has been jailed for almost six years after being caught with two illegally held revolvers – and refusing to reveal to police the PINs for his mobile phones. Twenty-nine-year-old Marvin Jones, of Tyneham Close, Clapham, was sentenced to five years and six months in prison for possessing the two revolvers, a Smith …
Gareth Corfield, 04 Aug 2016