Articles about Tribunal

GCHQ Benhall doughnut aerial view

GCHQ didn't illegally spy on Brit NGOs, tribunal rules

Privacy International and Liberty failed today to convince the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT) that GCHQ had unlawfully intercepted the communications of, and snooped on, UK-based human rights groups. The IPT, in its third and final judgment relating to the spying activities of Blighty spooks, said in its ruling on Monday …
Kelly Fiveash, 22 Jun 2015

Nothing illegal to see here: Tribunal says TEMPORA spying is OK

The UK’s Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT) ruled Friday that GCHQ’s mass surveillance TEMPORA program is legal ... in principle. The IPT said that (again, in principle) British spooks are entitled to carry out mass surveillance of all fibre optic cables entering or leaving the UK under the 2000 RIPA law. It made the ruling …
Jennifer Baker, 05 Dec 2014
management regulation1

Snowden leaks LEGALISED GCHQ's 'illegal' dragnet spying, rules British tribunal

+Docs Revelations in documents leaked by former NSA sysadmin Edward Snowden accidentally made British spies' data-sharing relationship with the US NSA lawful by making the secret relationship public, the Investigatory Powers Tribunal ruled today. GCHQ judgment: Liberty v the Foreign and Commonwealth Office In a bizarre twist of …
Kat Hall, 06 Feb 2015
BBC logo 2012

£100m DMI omnifail: BBC managers' emails trawled by employment tribunal

Analysis The BBC last week stood by its dismissal of former technology chief John Linwood over the failed £100m digital media initiative. The Corporation was judged to have broken the law in dismissing Linwood and reading the tribunal’s findings makes the BBC's defence difficult to accept. According to the BBC, the tribunal “ …
Gavin Clarke, 12 Aug 2014
GCHQ Benhall doughnut aerial view

GCHQ's 'NOSEY SMURF' spyware snoops dragged into secretive tribunal

Privacy International has launched a legal bid to stop GCHQ and British intelligence agents from "unlawfully" spying on Brits using malware. Its complaint [PDF] to the UK’s Investigatory Powers Tribunal is a formal challenge to snoops' use of malicious software and hacking to surveil people. The campaigning charity fears …
Jasper Hamill, 14 May 2014
BBC logo 2012

‘Scapegoated’ BBC tech boss calls foul, kicks off unfair sacking tribunal

The BBC’s former technology chief John Linwood claims he was made a scapegoat for the collapse of the Digital Media Initiative – the corporation’s £125m media sharing and archiving project that was axed a year ago with nothing to show for it. Linwood was placed on gardening leave (on full £287,000 pa pay) as the project was put …
Andrew Orlowski, 07 May 2014
GCHQ Benhall doughnut aerial view

IPT: Sorry we confused Amnesty International with Egyptian group

The Investigatory Powers Tribunal has published its emails with claimants in a case, brought against GCHQ, apologising for and correcting an error in its findings in last week's NGO spying case verdict. In a public letter [PDF] to Liberty & Others, Sir Michael Burton, president of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal, apologised …
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Doctors face tribunal over claims of plagiarism in iPhone app

Three doctors face the withdrawal or suspension of their licences to practise medicine after being accused of releasing an iPhone app which allegedly plagiarised material from an award-winning medical textbook. One of the three stands further accused of writing a "misleading" review praising the app on the App Store. The trio …
Jasper Hamill, 04 Sep 2013
carving of kiwi

New Zealand's Copyright Tribunal to hear first cases

The New Zealand music industry has taken aim at illegal music downloaders threatening to use the controversial ‘Skynet’ law for the first time before the new Copyright Tribunal. The three strikes, Skynet law, passed in September last year allows copyright owners to send evidence of alleged infringements to carriers and ISPs, who …
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Accidental discounts land Apple in NZ's Disputes Tribunal

Apple is in trouble over pricing again – this time, however, because an apparent e-store glitch let a New Zealander whack together a $NZ1,600 order for $NZ35. Adam Crouchley, a 'Wordpress developer, SM advisor and Radio Announcer on Hashtag Radio', according to his LinkedIn profile, told El Reg, as we followed up a report by …

Fight back against illegal GCHQ spying with PAPERWORK!

Privacy International (PI) is calling on people to sign up to be part of a mass request for confirmation they have been spied on by Five Eyes spy agencies and to demand the removal of captured information. Would-be signatories are being asked to submit their name and email address to the organisation, which will then pass them …
Darren Pauli, 17 Feb 2015
GCHQ as seen on Google Earth

We'll ask GCHQ to DELETE records of 'MILLIONS' of people – Privacy International

Campaigning group Privacy International is preparing to help “potentially millions” of people request that their GCHQ records be deleted, following a landmark ruling by the Investigatory Powers Tribunal on Friday. The IPT ruled that the intelligence-sharing relationship between the US and UK had been unlawful prior to December …
Kat Hall, 09 Feb 2015
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UK.gov spied on human rights warriors at Amnesty International

The British government has admitted that its spook agency GCHQ spied on Amnesty International, according to campaigners at the human rights group. Amnesty said on Wednesday that it had received an email from the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT) – the organization responsible for policing the UK's surveillance of its own …
Iain Thomson, 02 Jul 2015
Three  UK Passports

Home Office wins appeal against £224m e-Borders payout

The UK Home Office has won an appeal against US defence giant Raytheon to award the company £224m after cancelling its £750m e-Borders contract. The company was engaged by the Home Office in 2007 to design the e-Borders technology system. However, by 2010 the Home Office had terminated the contract on that grounds that key …
Kat Hall, 17 Feb 2015
The Register breaking news

News leech's fresh cash deal with rags 'reasonable' – tribunal

The fees that businesses will have to pay news aggregators of newspapers' online content for their services have been set after a Copyright Tribunal determined the terms were "reasonable". The Tribunal accepted licensing terms agreed upon by news monitoring service Meltwater and the Newspaper Licensing Agency (NLA). Under the …
OUT-LAW.COM, 22 May 2012
The Register breaking news

Tribunal: ICO was wrong to bin angry man's FOI request

The UK's freedom of information (FOI) law watchdog was wrong to rule that an FOI request was vexatious, the Information Rights Tribunal – formerly the Information Tribunal – has ruled. The request had a "clear purpose and value" and was not "manifestly unreasonable", the Tribunal said. The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO …
OUT-LAW.COM, 30 Aug 2011
Judiciary.gov.uk's expired certificate snafu, as seen via Firefox

SNAFU: Blighty's judges not trustworthy, says their own website

UK.gov's judiciary website has had its security compromised after bungling administrators failed to renew a security certificate. The judiciary.gov.uk site is designed to provide information on Blighty's top legal bods and information on judgments. It represents the Judicial Office, which reports to the Lord Chief Justice and …
Kat Hall, 27 May 2015
GCHQ Benhall doughnut aerial view

Law changed to allow GCHQ hacking ... just as GCHQ hauled into court for hacking

Updated Government legislation to exempt GCHQ from prosecution on charges of illegal hacking has been passed and come into effect – apparently torpedoing an ongoing claim against the surveillance agency being heard by the Investigatory Powers Tribunal. Last July, a coalition of internet service providers and international organisations …
GCHQ Benhall doughnut aerial view

GCHQ heard you liked spying, so spied on itself spying on you

Sir Mark Waller, the Intelligence Services Commissioner, has delivered his fourth annual report to the Prime Minister, revealing that GCHQ's internal monitoring system slurped up its own employees' privates to an unauthorised degree. The 69-page report [PDF] noted that GCHQ reported an error to the commissioner in 2014, "when an …
BBC logo 2012

BBC man Linwood 'was unfairly sacked' over £100 MILLION DMI omnifail

A BBC technology chief who took the fall for the Corporation's failed £100m Digital Media Initiative was unfairly dismissed, an employment tribunal has ruled.. The tribunal that found that the BBC broke the law in suspending its chief technology officer, John Linwood. The tribunal found Linwood was unfairly dismissed under the …
Gavin Clarke, 07 Aug 2014
The Register breaking news

Information Tribunal abolished as new service takes charge

The appeals process for freedom of information and data protection cases changes from today as the previous structure is absorbed into a wider tribunals service. The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) is responsible for monitoring organisations' compliance with freedom of information and data protection laws. Appeals …
OUT-LAW.COM, 19 Jan 2010
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Singapore netizens slap silks for copyright bullying

Singapore's Internet Society is fighting back against lawyers for sending speculative demands on behalf of Dallas Buyers Club. The society says lawyers who sent the letters have breached the Singapore Law Society’s ethical guidelines by using threats of criminal proceedings to advance a civil legal claim. As reported by local …
Three  UK Passports

Home Office awards Raytheon £150m over e-borders cancellation

The Home Office has agreed to hand over £150m to defence company Raytheon over the dispute relating to the cancellation of the £750m e-Borders contract. The money is on top of legal costs of £35m, which El Reg exclusively revealed has so far been spent in extracting itself from the contract. In 2007, the Home Office contracted …
Kat Hall, 27 Mar 2015
The Register breaking news

Tribunal rules Digifone paid bung for Irish GSM licence

An investigation into payments made to two Irish politicians has, for the last four years, focused on the GSM licence awarded in 1996, resulting in a decision that improper payments were made. The Moriarty Tribunal, part II (volumes 1 and 2 available now), explicitly states that Denis O'Brien's Esat Digifone made payments to …
Bill Ray, 23 Mar 2011
The Register breaking news

Info Tribunal appeals to split from January

People appealing against rulings by the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) will face a new tribunal structure from January next year. The Information Tribunal, which hears appeals on ICO rulings, will become part of a wider system. Under the new regime, which awaits Parliamentary approval, very serious or very complex cases …
OUT-LAW.COM, 18 Aug 2009

Evidence during FOI disputes can be provided in SECRET

Public bodies defending a decision to withhold information requested under freedom of information (FOI) laws can submit evidence to an information rights tribunal in secret, the Court of Appeal has ruled. The Court said that tribunal rules allow for closed evidence sessions to be conducted, meaning that neither the FOI requester …
OUT-LAW.COM, 05 Aug 2014
The Register breaking news

Businesses believe tribunal system favours employees

Almost all employers think the current Employment Tribunal system favours employees over businesses, a new survey has found. Only 3 per cent of firms are satisfied with the current system while 97 per cent of companies think the system is weighted in favour of workers, the survey by law firm Pinsent Masons said. Pinsent Masons …
OUT-LAW.COM, 14 Jun 2011

Liquidator: 2e2 preferential creditors to get £745k payout

2e2's preferential creditors, including former staffers made redundant after the business crashed and burned, have been told what they can expect collctively from the financial embers and it's not a lot. The Berkshire-based integrator’s UK ops went into administration at the start of 2013, the result of too many poorly …
Paul Kunert, 15 May 2015
GCHQ is following you on Twitter, Faceboo, email...

NSA slapdown prompts Privacy Int'l to file new lawsuit against GCHQ

Privacy International has stepped up its battle against GCHQ, and yesterday filed an official legal challenge to the spy agency's mass snooping on net users. Emboldened by new restrictions to the similar programme run by America's National Security Agency (NSA), PI filed the complaint in the UK’s Investigatory Powers Tribunal. …
Jennifer Baker, 09 Jun 2015

Shy, retiring British spies come out as MEGA HACKERS

The UK government slipped out consultation documents on "equipment interference" and "interception of communications" (read: computer hacking by police and g-men) on Friday. They were made public on the same day that the Investigatory Powers Tribunal ruled that the spying revelations exposed by master blabbermouth Edward Snowden …
Kelly Fiveash, 08 Feb 2015

Nominet new CEO opens giant can of worms, sticks head in

Despite having claimed the scalp of his predecessor and a former chair – and almost forced a government takeover of the company – the new CEO of .UK registry Nominet, Russell Haworth, will look into how his organization is structured. In just-released minutes [PDF] from a board meeting held last week, Nominet has decided to …
Kieren McCarthy, 25 May 2015

Former 2e2 workers WIN case for protective award

An employment tribunal has ruled in favour of former 2e2 workers' claims for protective awards. A year after the saga began, hundreds are to be paid up to eight weeks' wages by the government – the maximum allowed. There weren't many winners in the firm's collapse - save for, perhaps, the administrators - with staff out of a job …
Paul Kunert, 24 Jan 2014
The Register breaking news

Gov unveils plans to reduce employment tribunal claims

The government will remove the right of employees of one year standing to make unfair dismissal claims, will allow more Employment Tribunals to sit with a single judge and could ask claimants to pay to make a claim, it has said. Plans to reform the way that employees can make claims will also force all claims into arbitration …
OUT-LAW.COM, 28 Jan 2011
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Tribunal orders DWP to release IT contract details

The Information Tribunal has ordered a government department to publish most of the till-now withheld details of a major IT contract, after ruling that the public interest was served better by disclosure than secrecy. The First Tier Tribunal has said (pdf) that most of the withheld material in a contract between the Department …
OUT-LAW.COM, 24 Sep 2010
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Tax tribunal finds contractor wasn't employee

The Tax Tribunal has found that a contractor was not an employee in a case involving controversial tax avoidance law IR35. Whether or not a worker is an employee of a company or not can only be decided by looking at a wide range of facts related to their working life. It said a designer in the aircraft industry was not an Airbus …
OUT-LAW.COM, 15 Feb 2011
Three  UK Passports

e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt

Brit taxpayers face a £224m bill in cancellation fees after the UK government scrapped a £750m contract for a passenger-checking computer system at its borders. The contract for the e-Borders IT project, which is supposed to scrutinize the identities of people entering the country, was signed in 2007, back when the Labour Party …
Iain Thomson, 19 Aug 2014

BACK OFF, spooks: UK legal hacking code should be 'resisted at all costs' says lawyer

A proposed "electronic interference" code for spooks will sanction pervasive hacking powers without judicial or parliamentary scrutiny, experts and campaigners have warned. The government slipped out its consultation documents on "equipment interference" and "interception of communications" last month – on the same day the …
Kat Hall, 09 Mar 2015
Edward Snowden

Review mass-snoop laws regularly, says RIPA daddy Blunkett

Every Parliament must conduct a "complete review" of the controversial Regulation Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (RIPA) as a safeguard against the expansion of its use, former home secretary David Blunkett said today. As home secretary in 2001 Blunkett was responsible for introducing the complex rules surrounding the use of the …
Kat Hall, 09 Dec 2014

Ex-2e2 staffers STILL waiting for wages owed

The frustration for hundreds of 2e2 staffers waiting to discover if they are to be paid wages owed to them continues nearly a year after the Berkshire-based integrator went under in dramatic circumstances. Some 356 claimants of 2e2 UK Ltd, Oakley Capital Ltd, Daisy Data Centre and Telefonica are holding out for the funds, and …
Paul Kunert, 15 Jan 2014
Apple iPhone 6 and 6 Plus

Canadian watchdog goes to court to probe Apple's iPhone deals with mobe networks

Watchdogs in Canada are investigating Apple over concerns the iPhone giant violated antitrust laws in its dealings with Canadian telcos. A spokesperson for Canada's Competition Bureau confirmed the Cupertino goliath is the subject of a probe into possible violations of the nation's Competition Act. "I can confirm that the …
Shaun Nichols, 11 Dec 2014

Former Tech Data UK beancounters may face rubber-glove treatment

The Financial Reporting Council will probe the processes used by staff linked to Tech Data UK's monumental three-year financial blunder. Blighty's largest technology distributor, previously known as Computer 2000, unearthed accountancy errors for fiscal 2011, 2012 and 2013 last spring. A subsequent internal investigation forced …
Paul Kunert, 12 May 2014
Nervous girl bites nails

ICO to fine UNBIDDEN MARKETEERS who cause 'ANXIETY'

Businesses that send spam text messages, make nuisance calls or carry out other types of unsolicited direct electronic marketing activity could be fined up to £500,000 if their actions cause "annoyance, inconvenience or anxiety", under new plans unveiled by the UK government. The Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) …
OUT-LAW.COM, 28 Oct 2014

Google closes briefcase on Italian job: Execs 'not liable' for privacy breach

Two senior Google staff members and another former executive at the company cannot be held liable for a breach of privacy caused when a video was uploaded to its Google Video platform in Italy, the Italian Supreme Court has ruled. Italian lawyer Marco Consonni of Orsingher Ortu, who read the judgment, told Out-Law.com that the …
OUT-LAW.COM, 06 Feb 2014
The Register breaking news

Copyright Tribunal rules will change to fast track smaller cases

The Government is changing the way that a copyright disputes body operates in a bid to save time and money. It has opened a consultation on the changes to the operation of the Copyright Tribunal. The Tribunal is the body that rules on disputes between users and collecting or licensing societies. These societies act for groups of …
OUT-LAW.COM, 15 Apr 2009

Former staffers of titsup Brit IT giant 2e2 haul administrator to court over pay

A group of former 2e2 staff are set to discover next week at an employment tribunal how successful they've been in efforts to recover monies they claim are owed to them by administrator FTI Consulting. The 200-strong bunch will have their case heard in Reading on 17 September under the representation of Jenny Andrews at Andrews …
Paul Kunert, 11 Sep 2013

If you're suing the UK govt, Brit spies will snoop on your briefs

British agents spy on lawyers and their clients who are suing the UK government – and then pass their confidential conversations onto the government's legal team, it's claimed. Evidence of dirty tricks surfaced amid a court case brought against the British government by two Libyan families, who were kidnapped and sent back to …
Iain Thomson, 07 Nov 2014
Oh no, I'll have to ask Dabbsy

Hear that, Sigourney? Common names 'may not constitute personal data'

Common names of people may not, read alone, constitute "personal data", the Court of Appeal has said. The Court said that only if common names were matched with other information would it be possible to identify the individuals to whom the names relate. Data protection laws only apply to the processing of personal data. "A name …
OUT-LAW.COM, 12 Feb 2014

After Brit spies 'snoop' on families' lawyers, UK govt admits: We flouted human rights laws

The British government has admitted that its practice of spying on confidential communications between lawyers and their clients was a breach of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). Details of the controversial snooping emerged in November: lawyers suing Blighty over its rendition of two Libyan families to be tortured …
Iain Thomson, 19 Feb 2015
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2e2 staffers get day in court over unpaid pre-meltdown wages

Hundreds of former 2e2 UK employees will be told just days before Christmas at a Reading tribunal whether wages owed to them will be paid in full or not. There are some 356 claimants of 2e2 UK Ltd, Oakley Capital Ltd, Daisy Data Centre and Telefonica, a clerk at Reading tribunal told The Channel. The hearing date has been set …
Paul Kunert, 24 Sep 2013
The Register breaking news

Info Tribunal fluffed on FOI, rules High Court

The Information Tribunal misunderstood part of a Freedom of Information (FOI) Act request and failed to properly adjudicate other parts of it, the High Court has said. The case must be re-considered by the Tribunal. The Information Tribunal hears appeals from decisions of the Information Commissioner, and Tribunal decisions can …
OUT-LAW.COM, 24 Jul 2009