Feeds

Articles about Thorn

Life of Brian

Unionised workers vote to become thorn in HP's side

Some HP workers in the Application Services (AS) division based at Lytham and Warrington have voted against plans to relocate 400 roles to regional delivery centres. According to numbers from HP and the Public and Commercial Services (PCS) union, 99 of the 331-strong base of unionised workers at the two sites returned a ballot …
Paul Kunert, 14 Jul 2014
Nyancoin logo

Exploit emerges for LZO algo hole

Security Mouse security researcher Don A Bailey has showcased an exploit of the Lempel-Ziv-Oberhumer (LZ0) compression algorithm running in the Mplayer2 media player and says it could leave some Linuxes vulnerable to attack. The LZO data compression algorithm was created by Markus Oberhumer in 1994 and was discovered to be …
Darren Pauli, 11 Jul 2014
DIME

DIME for your TOP SECRET thoughts? Son of Snowden's crypto-chatter client here soon

Lavabit founder Ladar Levison will within six months carve out a military-grade email service from the ashes of Ed Snowden's favourite email client. As many of you will remember, Levison killed the service to prevent his clients' information from getting into the clutches of the Federal Bureau of Investigations. The popular …
Darren Pauli, 11 Aug 2014
The ITMugs Surf for Porn mug

Google went behind our backs and really HURT US, squeal upset porn kingpins

The porn industry has hit back at Google after its decision to ban smutty sites from using its main advertising platform. The search engine's new policy on porn came into force last week and effectively bans any grumble movie makers from promoting their sites using Adwords, a service which puts paid-for advertising next to …
Jasper Hamill, 10 Jul 2014

NSA reporter leaves paper for eBay billionaire backed media biz

Glenn Greenwald, the reporter who broke the NSA surveillance story, is leaving British daily The Guardian to join a mysterious new eBay billionaire-backed publication. The American journalist has been a thorn in the NSA's side ever since he worked on the release of documents leaked by its contracted sysadmin Edward Snowden, who …
Jasper Hamill, 17 Oct 2013

China challenged to take down ALL of AWS and Google

Non-profit anti-censorship body GreatFire.org has created a mirrored site that allows users in China to view the recently blocked Reuters site, in a move which could take down thousands of websites in the PRC if the authorities decide to play hardball. Reuters China and the local language version of the Wall Street Journal were …
Phil Muncaster, 19 Nov 2013

Forecast cloudy as Office 365 pushes into 38 new markets

Microsoft has reached a milestone in its ongoing efforts to make personal productivity a cloudy caper, by switching on Office 365 available to users in 38 new markets and three new languages including Vietnamese and Malay. Asian and African countries featured heavily on the list of newly Office-in-the-cloud-equipped markets with …
Phil Muncaster, 15 Jul 2013

Intel uncloaks next-gen 'Braswell' Atom, 64-bit Android KitKat kernel

On the second day of its developers conference in Shenzhen, China, Intel revealed the codename – "Braswell" – of its next-generation Atom processor for low-cost mobile devices and a 64-bit Android KitKat 4.4.2 kernel, and outlined its belief that a "large resurgence" is coming to the desktop market. Slide from Intel Developer …
Rik Myslewski, 04 Apr 2014
Frodo and the Ring

IBM trudges onward despite hardware weight around its neck

IBM reported fourth-quarter earnings that were a mixed bag on Tuesday, with hardware remaining the chief thorn in Big Blue's side – as has been the case throughout its fiscal 2013. Total revenues shrank for both the quarter and the year, with Q4 sales down 5.5 per cent to $27.7bn and annual sales down 4.6 per cent to $99.8bn. …
Neil McAllister, 22 Jan 2014
Sina Weibo logo

Chinternet uncensored: Decrypt Weibo tool unblocks tweets

The team behind anti-censorship not-for-profit GreatFire.org has turned on a new service designed to allow micro-bloggers in China to recover censored Sina Weibo posts, in a move which won't go down well with Beijing. Decrypt Weibo comes from GreatFire’s FreeWeibo project and, as the name suggests, is a decrypting tool which …
Phil Muncaster, 03 Oct 2013
The Register breaking news

Hmm, I think I'll order an iPad Mini on Amazon ... Oh no I won't

Amazon has weighed into the tablet pooh-pooh battle, following Apple's blow by blow comparison with a Samsung Galaxy Tab during the iPad Mini launch last week. The gloves are off down at Tablet Club, and this time the iPad Mini is on the receiving end. Amazon is taking a direct swipe at Apple's littlest Pad with a point by point …
Anna Leach, 30 Oct 2012
The Register breaking news

iQuit: Apple union boss chucks grappling hook up garden wall

The founder of a union for Apple retail workers has quit his job after two years spent battling for better pay and job prospects. Cory Moll, who works in San Francisco, founded the union in 2011 and has been an outspoken critic of the fruity firm's treatment of its staff. At the time of writing, no one had stepped up to fill …
Jasper Hamill, 09 Apr 2013
Computacenter

Frenchies and Germans are holding us back, moans Computacenter

Tech resell monster Computacenter (CC) today warned investors that troubled services contracts and economic woes in its mainland Euro ops will dampen group growth for 2013. London-based CC provided the guidance as it rolled out an interim management statement reporting sales of £659.4m, flat relative to Q1 a year ago, with a …
Paul Kunert, 24 Apr 2013
Thorn EMI Liberator

Liberator: the untold story of the first British laptop part 1

In 1985, the UK home computer boom was over. Those computer manufacturers who had survived the sales wasteland that was Christmas 1984 quickly began to turn their attention away from the home users they had courted through the first half of the 1980s to the growing and potentially much more lucrative business market. The IBM PC …
Tony Smith, 12 Nov 2012
Thorn EMI Liberator

Liberator: the untold story of the first British laptop part 3

In the early 1980s, civil servant Bernard Terry devised a 'portable text processor' to make his fellow civil servants more productive in the office and out. Electronics giant Thorn EMI designed the machine with help of a team of former Dragon Data engineers. As the Liberator, it launched in September 1985 to become the first …
Tony Smith, 16 Nov 2012
Thorn EMI Liberator

Liberator: the untold story of the first British laptop part 2

It is 1984 and Bernard Terry, a civil servant, has devised a 'portable text processor' to make his fellow civil servants more productive in the office and out. Electronics giant Thorn EMI has agreed to manufacturer the machine, which will eventually be called the Liberator and become Britain's first laptop computer. Thorn has …
Tony Smith, 14 Nov 2012
The Register breaking news

Apple pushes out Mac OS X update to fix Time Machine fail

Apple has released a supplemental update to Mac OS X Lion that fixes a problem with the Time Machine back-up system. Some Lion users are currently experiencing errors while attempting to restore from a Time Machine backup, or even attempting to back up on the feature – as described on this Mac help forum here – so the fix is …
Anna Leach, 06 Mar 2012

MANUAL STIMULATION: Whack me with some proper documentation

Another day, another app, another incomprehensible user interface. If this was a proper piece of software running on a proper computer rather than a £500 phone, phablet or some similar pharcical phucking phanboi phondleslab, it might be possible to call up a Help menu or leaf through a manual. Instead, I’m left staring at a …
Alistair Dabbs, 15 Nov 2013
Dr Who fans at the opening of the Sydney Dr Who store

TARDIS materialises in Sydney

A bright, early, morning, a long line of fans queued outside a soon-to-open shop, and a Reg reporter. No, dear readers, you haven't missed an iPhone release, but instead the public emergence of the Dr Who pop-up store, a merchandise outlet erected by the avaricious cunning folk at BBC Licensing, who've decided to give Australian …
Simon Sharwood, 09 May 2013
John McAfee

McAfee founder claims police framing him for murder

John McAfee, antivirus pioneer and current fugitive from the Belizean police, claims he is being set up by locals as the fall guy for the murder of his next-door neighbor. "Under no circumstances am I going to willingly talk to the police in this country," he told Wired. "You can say I'm paranoid about it but they will kill me, …
Iain Thomson, 13 Nov 2012

Samsung accused of sex discrimination in China plant

South Korean electronics behemoth Samsung has been hit by fresh allegations of impropriety at one of its manufacturing plants in China, this time involving purported sexual discrimination in its hiring policy. Rights group China Labor Watch (CLW), which has been something of a thorn in the side of the chaebol in recent months, …
Phil Muncaster, 11 Sep 2012

Windows XP is finally DEAD, right? Er, not quite. Here's what to do if you're stuck with it

Today will be like no other day because it’s the last Patch Tuesday for Windows XP. Yet there's good news if you're still using XP. For starters, you're not alone. Thirteen years after it was released, Windows XP remains the world’s second most popular PC operating system. It's running on 27.69 per cent of consumer machines, …
Gavin Clarke, 08 Apr 2014
The Register breaking news

Panic on the streets of Google+? Choc Factory hires Digg founder

Google has reportedly hired Digg founder Kevin Rose, who earlier this week shuttered his latest startup project, Milk Inc, to allow the outfit to shift to an unspecified new project. It turns out, according to a scoop from Liz Gannes over at All Things Digital, that Rose is moving to the Chocolate Factory with his Milk team. …
Kelly Fiveash, 16 Mar 2012
The Register breaking news

Yahoo! chief! says! sorry! for! CV! snafu!

Yahoo!'s CEO Scott Thompson has issued an emailed apology for his gilded CV to employees at the company, as the board decides what it's going to do about his misstated education. Thompson is in hot water over a discrepancy in his CV that said he held a computer science degree when he doesn't, an issue Yahoo! called "an …
Workers in a Foxconn plant, credit: Steve Jurvetson from Menlo Park, USA

Apple urged to defy China's one child policy

Chinese activist and exiled dissident Chen Guangchen has waded into the controversy surrounding working conditions at the Chinese suppliers of big name tech brands by calling on Apple and others to stand up against his country’s infamous one child policy. Self-taught lawyer Chen became something of a local hero and thorn in the …
Phil Muncaster, 06 Sep 2012

Pay TV giant Hulu becomes victim of its own success

The latest rumour of Hulu CEO Jason Kilar’s imminent departure sounds like a good old silly season story designed to fill the void of empty news pages while people are on vacation. But the fact Hulu has been attracting such rumours while other big hitters in pay TV never seem to get them, itself provides a clue to a story of …
Faultline, 28 Aug 2012
The Register breaking news

'You can say I'm paranoid about it, but they will kill me'

This was the week when Belizean police started the search for securities firm founder John McAfee, a suspect in the murder of his neighbour. McAfee appears to be on the lam from the police, hiding under sand and issuing statements to the media about his "persecution". The antivirus pioneer claimed that the police were trying to …
Workers in a Foxconn plant, credit: Steve Jurvetson from Menlo Park, USA

Foxconn certified as good employer, rights groups disagree

The Fair Labor Association (FLA) has claimed Apple supplier Foxconn is ahead of schedule with a remediation plan in place at three factories to improve working conditions, but labour groups have warned that major issues still exist throughout Apple’s supply chain. The FLA’s latest report tracks progress at Foxconn’s plants in …
Phil Muncaster, 22 Aug 2012

MSX: The Japanese are coming! The Japanese are coming!

MSX: three initials that struck fear into the heart of Britain’s nascent home computer industry. The Japanese were coming, and the UK’s technology pioneers were anxious about what that might mean. Far Eastern firms like Sony, JVC, Sanyo and Pioneer had put paid to Britain’s mass-market hi-fi makers, and others had killed the …
Tony Smith, 27 Jun 2013
The Register breaking news

Sky's mobile movies move leaves Apple, Amazon gasping

It has been five years since Apple unveiled its TV tuner – and it increasingly looks like Cupertino missed the boat. Sky this week added on-demand movies to its Sky Go service, which means anyone already on the platform can view shows from the couch on a mobile or a tablet. Sky’s 11 live linear channels are also available for …
Andrew Orlowski, 29 Nov 2011
Sinclair Research Pandora

Loki, LC3 and Pandora: The great Sinclair might-have-beens

We all know about the ZX80, the ZX81, the ZX Spectrum and its successors, and the QL. But these weren’t the only microcomputers Sinclair Research worked on during its brief life between 1979, when it emerged as the renamed Science of Cambridge, and 1986, the year its brand and products were bought by Amstrad and it was shut down …
Tony Smith, 19 Feb 2014

Think enterprise software is complex? Check out the licences

Enterprises shouldn't be surprised to discover they're having trouble understanding their enterprise licensing agreements. While Oracle, SAP and other big players publicly tout transparency and fairness in their licensing and pricing policies, customers often disagree when they get to the bargaining table or open the results of …
Alex Woodie, 09 May 2013
Sinclair QL

Sinclair’s 1984 big shot at business: The QL is 30 years old

In May 1983, Sinclair Research Managing Director Nigel Searle began briefing the press about the successful British micro maker’s next big release. It was 13 months after the company had launched the Spectrum and although that machine had become a huge success, punters and market-watchers were keen to hear about what Sinclair …
Tony Smith, 12 Jan 2014
The Register breaking news

Boffin's wall of BEES shields farms from stampeding elephants

A British researcher who studied elephants' fear of being stung by bees has been given a gong for developing a fence of beehives to reduce clashes between humans and the mighty mammals. Dr Lucy King's invention stops the giant animals from wandering onto farm land and causing havoc because they are so terrified of swarms of the …
Kelly Fiveash, 23 Nov 2011
Comet Siding Spring. Pic: NASA

Why did Comet fail? Hint: It wasn't just the credit insurers

Comet's fiscal light was burning less brightly well before OpCapita entered its orbit, but the venture capitalist's involvement snuffed it out entirely. Signs that all was not well can be traced back to 2008, when Comet's profit before tax tumbled from £56m to £25m. In successive years it posted losses of £8m, £3m and finally £ …
Eddie Pacey, 22 Nov 2012
SGI logo hardware close-up

Exabyte era nigh for Nexenta

The exabyte era is hurrying closer for ZFS storage supplier Nexenta, which hopes to have its partners ship more storage boxes than NetApp in five years time. We were briefed by CEO Evan Powell following a Nexenta customer and partner shindig in Amsterdam. He said Nexenta was running at around $500 million a year in partner sales …
Chris Mellor, 05 Jun 2012

How Britain could have invented the iPhone: And how the Quangocracy cocked it up

This is a disturbing, cautionary tale of quasi-government and its bungling. It describes how Britain could have led the recent advances in touchscreen technology, developing kit capable detecting more than one fingertip at once, years before Apple did – if it weren't for the nation's treacle-footed, self-serving quangocracy. …
Andrew Orlowski, 13 Dec 2013
Dragon 32. Source: Wikimedia

The Dragon 32 is 30

The Dragon 32, arguably the best-known and most-successful of the UK's early 1980s home computer also-rans, was introduced 30 years ago this month. The micro's story goes back more than a year before its launch. Tony Clarke, a senior manager at Swansea-based toy company Mettoy - best known for its Corgi die-cast metal car brand …
Tony Smith, 01 Aug 2012
arrow pointing up

Dell's faulty PC legal woes worsen (again)

The ongoing legal imbroglio over Dell's allegedly defective Optiplex computers took another turn this week when a proposed class-action lawsuit broadened its scope. The consumer-rights law firm of Hagens Berman LLP filed suit in August of last year on behalf of New York chiropractor Richard Statler, alleging that five Optiplex …
Rik Myslewski, 08 Jul 2011
Pioneer SC-LX85 THX Ultra 2 Plus

2011's Best... Hi-Fi and AV Kit

With hi-fi and home cinema now two sides of the same coin, it’s inevitable that these 2011's Best... heroes come in every shape and size. But while price points and technologies differ, all can be considered solid gold entertainers. So if you’re looking for the UK’s best value Blu-ray player, the highest-performing dock, or …
Steve May, 15 Dec 2011
The Register breaking news

Conn. lawman grills Apple and Amazon over e-book pricing

Connecticut's top law enforcement official said he is investigating whether agreements Apple and Amazon.com have reached with e-book publishers violate antitrust laws by freezing competitors out of the market. In letters to the general counsels of Apple and Amazon, Attorney General Richard Blumenthal said he was concerned about …
Dan Goodin, 02 Aug 2010
hands waving dollar bills in the air

Oracle demands another $211.6m from SAP

Oracle just keeps rubbing it in with application software rival SAP over the TomorrowNow fiasco. In a court filing on Friday, which was reported by various news outlets (see here and there, Oracle has gone back to the US District Court for the Northern District of California in Oakland, where a jury just awarded Oracle a $1.3bn …
Chris Shelton

UK micro pioneer Chris Shelton: The mind behind the Nascom 1

Chris Shelton is not well known today, yet the British microcomputer industry would have been a very much poorer place without him. Never as famous as Sir Clive Sinclair, with whom he worked in the past; Acorn’s Chris Curry, Herman Hauser, Steve Furber and Sophie Wilson; or even Tangerine and Oric’s Paul Johnson. Nonetheless, …
Tony Smith, 21 Aug 2013
The Register breaking news

Jacqui Smith and Charles Clarke shown the door

Former Home Secretary Jacqui Smith heads the list of high profile Labour casualties this morning. Meanwhile current party top brass thought to be under threat, such as Ed Balls, have so far been returned by their constituents. Karen Lumley, Smith's Tory opponent in the Redditch constituency overturned a majority of 1,948 to win …

Apple silences Psystar's rebel yell with injunction

Apple has finally secured a permanent injunction against Hackintosh thorn-in-the-side Psystar, apparently bringing over a year and a half of litigation to an end. The injunction, granted by the US District Court for the Northern District of California, prohibits Psystar Corp from selling copies of the Mac OS or selling products …
Joe Fay, 16 Dec 2009
fingers pointing at man

MS wields price cutlass at Chinese pirates

Microsoft has slashed the retail price of its Office 2007 suite in China by over 70 per cent for versions to counter widespread piracy in the country. The software giant has cut the selling price for Office 2007 Home and Student Edition to 199 yuan ($29) from 699 yuan ($102) as a special promotional offer that kicked off on …
Kelly Fiveash, 24 Sep 2008
Memotech MTX 500

30 years on: Remembering the Memotech MTX 500

Memotech liked to advertise its MTX 500 and 512 microcomputers with a picture of a speeding black Porsche, but the machines, which made their first public appearance 30 years ago this month, while undoubtedly quick off the mark soon slammed hard into an unforeseen wall thrown up by a sudden, severe change in market conditions. …
Tony Smith, 28 Jun 2013
globalisation

Computacenter injects a bit of predictability into revenue mix

Computacenter saw shares climb this morning as it updated investors on a successful first half of the year. For the six months ended 30 June 2009 profits were ahead of expectations, ignoring one-off items, thanks to a ten per cent increase in contractual services revenue. Elsewhere the recession is hitting the business - …
John Oates, 09 Jul 2009
Flag New Zealand

Alleged Kiwi botnet mastermind in court

An 18-year-old suspected of masterminding a botnet-fueled international cybercrime network has appeared in a New Zealand court. Owen Thorn Walker, of Whitianga in New Zealand's North Island, was charged with a variety of computer hacking offences including two counts of accessing a computer for dishonest purposes, two counts of …
John Leyden, 29 Feb 2008
The Register breaking news

When will Symbian compile?

Symbian won plaudits for releasing the Symbian/S60 codebase last week. It's not to be sniffed at, since it represents the biggest release of software under an "open" license ever undertaken, and the first time a market leader has made such a move. There's just one problem, the company openly acknowledges: it won't compile. …
Andrew Orlowski, 12 Feb 2010