Articles about Telegraph

Pokemon toys

Trump? Terror? Turkey? Whoa, there's a Tentacool in that Bush...

If terror attacks, coups and the prospect of a Trump presidency aren’t enough to convince the end of days might just be at hand, a brief review of the weekend’s Pokemon Go related news should tip the balance. As the augmented reality monster hunting smartphone game rolled out across the real world, players were shot at and …
Joe Fay, 18 Jul 2016

EU eyes flaw in Google’s cash machine

Analysis The European Commission has opened an aggressive new front in its battle with Google, one that Google thought it had secured years ago. And this is one that starts to gnaw away at Google’s core cash generation business. As well as advancing its prosecution of Google over vertical search, the new third area where the Commission …
Andrew Orlowski, 14 Jul 2016

England just not windy enough for wind farms, admits renewables boss

The head of the wind industry’s trade body in the UK has admitted England isn’t windy enough for any more wind farms. “We are almost certainly not talking about the possibility of new plants in England. The project economics wouldn’t work; the wind speeds don’t allow for it,” Hugh McNeal, head of Renewable UK told the …
Andrew Orlowski, 07 Jun 2016

Faded celebs' Twitter feeds degrade to sad, lonely smut storms

Symantec boffin Satnam Narang says some 2500 Twitter accounts, including those of journalists and other notables, have been compromised and used to sling pornography and links for dating sites. The accounts include those of a Telegraph journalist, a CNN correspondent, the National Post editor-in-chief, WKYT weekend anchor, …
Darren Pauli, 26 May 2016

Blighty's Virgin Queen threatened with foreign abduction

Royal Museums Greenwich has launched an appeal to save for the nation a fine reminder of when England's dealings with Europe involved not referendums but hostile navies at the receiving end of righteous storm and cannon fire. The Armada Portrait of Elizabeth I. Pic: Royal Museums Greenwich A reminder of the good old days ( …
Lester Haines, 23 May 2016
Google bikes outside Google HQ. Photo by Randy Miramontez/Shutterstock - for editorial use only.

EU mulls €3bn fine for Google

The European Commission may impose its largest ever fine on a company for misbehaving - and for Alphabet's Google, it could just be the start. The Sunday Telegraph reports that the Commission is considering a fine “in the region of €3bn” for Google’s anti-competitive search practices - or around half of Google’s European …
Andrew Orlowski, 16 May 2016

Brexit campaign group fined £50k for sending half a million spam texts

Pro-Brexit group Leave.EU has been fined £50,000 for sending up to 500,000 unsolicited text messages urging people to support its campaign, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) said today. The group, registered as Better for the Country Ltd and funded by millionaire UKIP donor Arron Banks, broke the law by not having …

Airport drone 'plastic bag'

A "drone" that apparently hit an aircraft at Heathrow Airport in the UK last weekend may have been a plastic bag. "The reported drone strike on Sunday has not been confirmed it was actually a drone. It was the local police force that tweeted that they had a report of a drone striking an aircraft," said UK transport minister …
Iain Thomson, 21 Apr 2016
Large leaver switch on a board of push button switches

US WEATHER SERVICE KILLS ALL CAPS

AMERICA'S NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILL STOP PROVIDING ALL ITS FORECASTS IN CAPS. THE AGENCY HAS BEEN USING ALL CAPS FOR MORE THAN 150 YEARS BECAUSE IT ORIGINATED WITH THE TELEGRAPH. THERE WAS AN EFFORT TO END THE PRACTICE and move to lower case about 20 years ago BUT THE AGENCY'S EQUIPMENT COULDN'T HANDLE IT. FORTUNATELY …
Kieren McCarthy, 12 Apr 2016
BT Openreach at work

Ofcom promises to have details on duct and pole access by summer

The communications regulator Ofcom has promised to release more details on how it intends to give BT's competitors greater access to Openreach's poles and ducts by the summer. The details follow Ofcom's decision in February in the once-in-a-decade Digital Communications Review to open up BT's network of telegraph poles and …
Kat Hall, 12 Apr 2016
European commission photo via Shutterstock

Three to chop off £3bn of its network in bid to woo EU over O2 merger

Three UK is making a last-ditch attempt to win EU approval of its £10.25bn O2 merger with a number of sweeteners, including £3bn in network deals with competitors, according to reports. According to The Telegraph, Three's owner, CK Hutchison, has signed deals with Virgin and Sky that will guarantee space on its expanded mobile …
Kat Hall, 07 Apr 2016
HMS Vengeance returns to HMNB Clyde. Crown copyright

Blighty's nuclear deterrent will get a software upgrade amid cyber-war fears

Software powering Britain's nuclear-tipped Trident II missiles is to be updated following fears of a cyber-attack, according to reports. The Daily Telegraph reported that Britain's Trident missiles, currently carried by the Royal Navy's Vanguard-class submarines, are to receive software updates to help guard against cyber- …
Gareth Corfield, 31 Mar 2016
Woman in bathrobe is shocked by something she is reading on her laptop. Pic via Shutterstock

Ofcom is keeping schtum over BT Openreach plans until end of year

Telecoms regulator Ofcom will not release details of its proposals for greater structural separation of Openreach and BT until the end of the year. In February the regulator stopped short of recommending a full separation of BT and Openreach in its Digital Communications Review. Ofcom will now draft its "proposals for …
Kat Hall, 31 Mar 2016

That one phone the FBI wanted unlocked? Here are 63 more, says ACLU

The FBI's promise that the San Bernardino iPhone case was a one-off is looking a tad hollow after the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) found another 63 ongoing cases of the government using an ancient law to enforce unlocking. "The FBI wants you to think that it will use the All Writs Act only in extraordinary cases to …
Iain Thomson, 30 Mar 2016
australia

Oz uni in right royal 'indigenous' lingo rumpus

The University of New South Wales (UNSW) has provoked a bit of a rumpus Down Under with its handy Indigenous Terminology guide, which "clarifies appropriate language use for the history, society, naming, culture and classifications of Indigenous Australian and Torres Strait Islander people". Those wishing to express themselves …
Lester Haines, 30 Mar 2016

William Hague: Brussels attacks mean we must destroy crypto ASAP

William Hague, the Conservative former Foreign Secretary in the UK, has claimed that the latest Brussels terrorist attacks “show the need to crack terrorist communications.” Writing in The Telegraph, Hague claimed that the stand-out detail from the attacks in Brussels was “the communications discipline of those responsible.” …

French publishers join Swedish 'Block Party' to pester ad refuseniks

French publishers are joining the “block party” - by taking aggressive collective action to thwart ad-blockers. In August, around 80 to 90 per cent of Swedish publishers will participate in a co-ordinated campaign to nag readers using ad blocking software that they really shouldn’t use ad blocking software. Le Figaro suggests …
Andrew Orlowski, 22 Mar 2016
Prey for the Gods - game by No Matter studios (sequel to In the Shadow of the Colossus)

CK Hutchison/O2: 'Four networks' dogma risks one giant and three hopeless dwarves

Analysis Three parent CK Hutchison is so keen to get its merger of O2 approved by Brussels, it’s willing to give up infrastructure and spectrum that a new entrant could use to create a fourth network. Brussels (and Ofcom) remain dead set on the UK having four major networks, rather than regulations that beef up competition from Virgin …
Andrew Orlowski, 15 Mar 2016
Tangle of cables attached to a telegraph pole

Optus cable can't connect 500,000: NBN CEO Bill Morrow

nbnTM, the builder of Australia's National Broadband Network (NBN), says it now does not expect to make the 500,000 connections it's previously said would be made on the hybrid fibre-coax (HFC) network for which it paid Optus AU$800 million. Under questioning from opposition senator Stephen Conroy at a hearing of the Senate …
BT Openreach van

Gosh, what a huge shock: Ofcom shies away from BT Openreach split, calls for reform

UK Communications regulator Ofcom waited until late February to shy away from recommending spinning off BT's Openreach, instead saying BT must open up its network to competitors and reform Openreach. The initial conclusions of Ofcom’s Strategic Review of Digital Communications said BT must open up its network of telegraph …
Kat Hall, 25 Feb 2016
de Havilland Tiger Moth

Oz defence to get $25 bn to spend on digital defences

Australia has reiterated its commitment to the Toothless Tiger Moth, with prime minister Malcolm Turnbull announcing an expansion of defence capital and personnel. Ahead of the long-awaited defence white paper, due for release this week, the federal government has said it will meet former prime minister Tony Abbott's promise …

For sale: One 236-bed nuclear bunker

Readers looking for a spacious pad with plenty of accommodation, plus "male and female WCs, commercial kitchen facilities, BBC audio visual broadcasting facility, conference facilities, air filtration systems, conference rooms, decontamination chambers, plant rooms and oil storage", are directed to the sale of a former nuclear …
Lester Haines, 02 Feb 2016
Jimmy "Jimbo" Wales

It's Wikipedia mythbuster time: 8 of the best on your 15th birthday

Comment Wikipedia's 15th birthday has brought its predictable spate of news coverage, some of it thoughtful, some of it filled with the inevitable barrage of spin and half-truths issuing from Wikimedia HQ. Here's a round-up. 1. Who founded Wikipedia? Jimmy Wales says in the Guardian, "I created Wikipedia 15 years ago". In 2001, he …
Andreas Kolbe, 18 Jan 2016
Photo by Heather Sorenson / sxc.hu

Put your private parts on display if you want to keep earning a living

Something for the Weekend, Sir? My prospective client is staring at my nuts. The quality of my work is apparently not too important. What really matters are the warm bits that dangle between my legs. Indeed, the human resources rep is insisting that I be prepared to present my lobster and urchins on demand, as regularly as possible. You’d think I would be …
Alistair Dabbs, 15 Jan 2016
stripped copper for recycling

Telstra dominates NBN retail, but less than you might think

Telstra's been accused of putting a stranglehold on National Broadband Network (NBN) connections. Our take: not quite yet. The criticisms stem from Murdoch organ The Daily Telegraph, which in an otherwise unremarkable story about the incumbent bulking up its technical staff for the NBN, included this unattributed, unsourced …
GCHQ Benhall doughnut aerial view

We know this isn't about PRISM, Matt Warman MP. But do you?

IPB +Comment Former consumer technology editor at The Telegraph and current Conservative MP Matt Warman derailed an NSA whistleblower's attempt to deliver evidence on GCHQ spying, raising questions about the committee's competence to scrutinise the government's draft surveillance bill. The MP offered distracting and irrelevant counter- …

Hacks rebel after bosses secretly install motion sensors under desks

Staff at one of Britain's oldest national newspapers got a shock on Monday morning when they found monitoring sensors installed under their desks. The boxes, sold by OccupEye as a way to monitor how long staff are at their desks without relying "on coffee cups and coats on chairs," were installed in the offices of The Daily …
Iain Thomson, 12 Jan 2016
Ada Lovelace, credit 2D Goggles

Lovelace at 200: Celebrating the High Priestess to Babbage's machines

A few of computing’s most vivid characters have become cultural icons. Most are from the last few decades, such as Steve Jobs and Alan Turing, but last month the University of Oxford held an academic symposium to mark the 200th birthday of one of the first: Ada, Countess of Lovelace, born on 10 December, 1815. Her …
SA Mathieson, 08 Jan 2016
hand holdin retro telephone

Watch out, er, 'oven cleaners': ICO plans nuisance call crackdown in 2016

The UK's Information Commissioner's Office is planning a further crackdown against nuisance call companies, with massive fines coming next year for transgressors. The non-departmental, regulatory public body imposed more than a million pound's worth of penalties on those responsible for nuisance calls and text messages in 2015 …
John Leyden, 29 Dec 2015
Kindle Big Brother

Big Brother is born. And we find out 15 years too late to stop him

Exclusive The "Big Brother" comprehensive national database system feared by many MPs has been built behind their backs over the last decade, and even has a name for its most intrusive component: a central London national phone and internet tapping centre called PRESTON. PRESTON, which collects about four million intercepted phone calls …
Duncan Campbell, 16 Dec 2015

Russia's blanket phone spying busted Europe's human rights laws

Russia's mass surveillance of all its citizens' telephone communications has been found to be a violation of the European Convention on Human Rights, which the country ratified in 1998. The Grand Chamber judgment from the European Court of Human Rights is the product of a complaint made by a Russian national, Roman Zakharov, …
World with light lines representing connectivity connecting various foci on the globe. Pic via Shutterstock

Flexible friend: Data's Big digital journey online

Big Data and All That The media appear to suffer from a congenital compulsion to simplify everything down to a level they can grasp. Big data is one of those simplifications: something that can be shoved down a Fat Pipe. Enid Blyton passed away before the IT explosion and only got as far as Big Ears. I don’t get any pleasure from nursery language …
John Watkinson, 03 Dec 2015
Sony PS4

Italians to spend €150m ... snooping on PS4 jabber

Italian counter-terror agents are to monitor Sony's PlayStation Network for jihadi chatter, according to the nation's justice minister, following alarmingly silly reports that a PS4 was used to coordinate the terrorist attacks in Paris. Andrea Orlando told Italian broadsheet Il Messaggero that the government would be investing …
Houses of Parliament at night-time

MPs and peers have just weeks to eyeball UK gov's super-snoop bid

IPB A joint panel of cross-party politicos and peers have been granted a very small window to scrutinise the Home Office's draft Investigatory Powers Bill. The committee is expected to report by mid-February next year – which is an incredibly short space of time to pore over a legalese-packed document that runs to nearly 300 pages …
Kelly Fiveash, 26 Nov 2015
ISIS fighters

Paris, jihadis, tech giants ... What is David Cameron's speechwriter banging on about now?

An article by the UK Prime Minister's chief speechwriter suggests Silicon Valley is happily aiding "tech-savvy jihadists." It echoes demands we've heard since the killings in France this month. A UK law professor and an infosec academic have helped us dismantle the piece. The ludicrous article in question, written by Clare …
Don Draper is Sad

EE plans to block annoying ads on mobile network

EE may have a pretty pathetic customer service record, but the company is hoping to cheer up its 27-million-strong subscriber base by potentially allowing them to block ads on their mobile phones. At present, the carrier is mulling a proposal to bring in network-level blocking tools for its customers. “We're at the beginning …
Kelly Fiveash, 23 Nov 2015

Get an Apple Watch or die warns Tim Cook

After hyping his first new product as Apple CEO to death, it appears Tim Cook is feeling the pressure to make the Apple Watch a success. Sadly, that has not been the case and the expensive and not terribly useful wristwatch is expected to have sold just seven million units in its first year, against expectations of 30 million …
Kieren McCarthy, 11 Nov 2015
backdoor_648. Pic via Shutterstock

Tim Cook: UK crypto backdoors would lead to 'dire consequences'

IPB Apple boss Tim Cook has once again warned of what he says would be the "dire consequences" of opening up backdoors to allow spies to access our data. He said it would be wrong for the UK government's latest super-spy bid – the draft Investigatory Powers Bill, which landed in Parliament last week – to weaken cryptography. Cook …
Kelly Fiveash, 10 Nov 2015

How Twitter can see the financial future – and change it

Scottish financial trader James Alan Craig has been charged in the US with allegedly using Twitter to manipulate share prices. That charge raises a fascinating question: can Twitter be used to fiddle the stock markets? According to the US Department of Justice, the 62 year old, from Dunragit in Dumfries and Galloway, caused …
Costas Milas, 10 Nov 2015
hacker

US, UK big banks to simulate mega-hacker cyber-attack

A mock exercise will take place this month to test how major banks respond to a major cyber attack, according to a newspaper report. The joint UK and US initiative, Operation Resilient Shield, will be "the most sophisticated test … yet" of the way industry communicates and coordinates its efforts in response to cyber security …
OUT-LAW.COM, 05 Nov 2015

Hi, um, hello, US tech giants. Mind, um, mind adding backdoors to that crypto? – UK govt

Analysis The UK government is apparently going to ask Apple, Google, and other American tech giants to give it the skeleton keys to their encryption systems. Based on our experience here in the US, the response is going to be a firm: "Fsck off." On Monday, the Daily Telegraph (a reliable friend of the ruling Conservative government) …
Iain Thomson, 03 Nov 2015
Solar filament eruption of August 31, 2012

US Military enlists radio hams to simulate fight with THE SUN

Nobody's quite forgotten that a really big solar event can upset kit even as crude as a telegraph, so the US military is recruiting radio hams to help test its contingency plans. The exercise will happen between November 8 and November 10 (US time), when operators will be asked to practice what to do before and after the Sun …

Hacked TalkTalk CEO: Dead as a Dido? Nope, she refuses to quit

TalkTalk boss Dido Harding has refused to bow to pressure to step down from her role, as the fall out from its cyber attack debacle continues. Earlier today the company 'fessed up to having 21,000 unique bank account numbers and sort codes breached, 28,000 obscured credit and debit card details, and 1.2 million customer email …
Kat Hall, 30 Oct 2015

The iPhone 6 doused in bromine - an incendiary mix or not?

Vid In case you've been wondering, like you do, just what happens if you pour bromine on an iPhone 6S, the Daily Telegraph reports on a vid which shows the Jesus mobe "bursting into flames" when doused in the malodorous element. Don't Ever Pour Bromine on an iPhone 6S! Well, we don't want to rain on this fiery spectacle, but it's …
Lester Haines, 26 Oct 2015
Tangle of cables attached to a telegraph pole

Of OpenStack and Cloud Orchestrator

Tomorrow’s computing systems will extend from legacy hardware and applications inside the company, through to virtualized, API-friendly applications still on-premise in the data centre, and further out to cloud-based systems off-premise. These in turn will divide down still further into dedicated, single-tenant cloud-based …
Robin Birtstone, 19 Oct 2015
Yoga_woman

WIN a 6TB Western Digital Black hard drive with El Reg

El Reg's last caption competition had two men experiencing an Oculus Rift in a forest. Lots of the captions – indeed, most of them – hinged around a large ear growing out of a tree behind the two VR viewers. Christian Bertrand / Shutterstock.com There are lots of regular names here, and multiple entries from some of the …
Simon Rockman, 16 Oct 2015
Mark Hurd and Safra Catz

Hurd clings to Oracle’s cloud growth as overall revenue declines

Mark Hurd, joint chief exec at Oracle, has come out as predictably bullish on the company's cloud prospects, stating in an interview that customers can't get enough of its fluffy white stuff. Speaking to The Telegraph, Hurd said compared with 12 or 15 months ago "the customer is more excited about and open to the cloud". He …
Kat Hall, 14 Oct 2015
Old beardy man thinking. Pic: Henadz via Flickr

Beard transplants up 600% for men 'lacking length elsewhere'

Hipsters lacking beards have splashed up to $7,000 on beard transplants. Some suspicious stats from "medical tourism" blog Medigo, have suggested a 600 per cent rise in the number of beard transplant operations between 2004 and 2014. "Beards are seen as a symbol of power and virility," the info graphic stated. "Lacking length …
Team Register, 05 Oct 2015

UK team pioneers experimental cure for age-related blindness

A UK medical team is pioneering a potential cure for age-related blindness, with a treatment aimed at replacing damaged cells. Doctors at London's Moorfields Hospital transplanted embryonic stem cells into a 60-year-old woman who recently became unable to see. The unnamed UK resident is one of many who suffer from age-related …
John Leyden, 29 Sep 2015
Welchman’s book and a portrait of him painted by his second wife, cubist painter Fannie Hillsmith. ©ShaunArmstrong/mubsta.com

Bletchley Park remembers 'forgotten genius' Gordon Welchman

An exhibition has been launched at Bletchley Park to commemorate the work of Cambridge lecturer and "forgotten genius" Gordon Welchman at Britain's wartime codebreaking centre. Titled Gordon Welchman: Bletchley Park's Architect of Ultra Intelligence, the exhibition is based on the book of the same name by the great man's …