Articles about Switzerland

Brexit White Paper published: Broad strokes, light on detail

The UK government has published its long-awaited white paper on negotiating a withdrawal from the European Union. Number 10's 77-page paper [PDF] mixes a list of desired outcomes in business and technology with the government's existing statements on national plans. The paper is light on detail but big on statements and broad …
Gavin Clarke, 02 Feb 2017

ProtonMail launches Tor hidden service to dodge totalitarian censorship

ProtonMail, the privacy-focused email business, has launched a Tor hidden service to combat the censorship and surveillance of its users. The move is designed to counter actions "by totalitarian governments around the world to cut off access to privacy tools" and the Swiss company specifically cited "recent events such as the …

Can all-flash arrays, spinning disks and hybrid really live together?

Conventional wisdom says that for performance-sensitive applications, you want all-flash arrays (AFAs), while for less-critical applications and bulk storage, disk is better. How can you use them in conjunction with each other? What would a joint AFA/hybrid/disk environment look like? Broadly speaking, there are two types of …
Danny Bradbury, 19 Jan 2017
Privacy

New Windows 10 privacy controls: Just a little snooping – or the max

Microsoft has built an online dashboard of privacy controls in an attempt to soothe lingering anger over Windows 10 and its ability to phone home people's private information. The new web portal lists some of the personal data that is collected from PCs and devices and sent back to Redmond, and allows people to somewhat limit …
Shaun Nichols, 11 Jan 2017
finger pushing first in set of dominos

Switzerland says Uber's an employer, sends social security bill

Switzerland is the latest country to decide that in spite of its protestations otherwise, Uber is an employer – at least in public liability terms. It's only a single case, but public liability insurer The Suva has decided that a driver is an Uber employee rather than an independent contractor. The Suva is responsible for …
Robot hands viewer a cup of tea. Photo by Shutterstock

Sexbots could ‘over-exert’ their human lovers, academic warns

The possibility of sex robots over-exerting their human lovers to the point of collapse is just one of the ethical conundrums academics and society need to get their head round, a Swiss academic told a conference on sex robots today. Oliver Bendel, of the University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Northwestern Switzerland, told …
Joe Fay, 19 Dec 2016
Huawei_600GB_SSD_inverted_colours

Huawei says its NVMe arrays with NVMe drives will be out in 2017

Interview Huawei is a believer in the use of NVMe drives and fabric. Yet it thinks that shared array controller software and hardware will need upgrading to take full advantage of NVMe drives. It does not believe customers are ready to adopt NVMe over fabric-accessed arrays because of problem areas such as routability for ROCE. We asked …
Chris Mellor, 08 Dec 2016

Brexit means Brexit: What the heck does that mean...

Apparently the Brexit result has caused some IT leaders to look at repatriating data to the UK to “comply with data protection laws and especially GDPR”. But wait a minute – this seems to be more about a lack of understanding of data protection laws. Again. Earlier this year I wrote about emotional knee-jerk reactionism being …
Frank Jennings, 02 Dec 2016

ESA: Sorry about Schiaparelli, can we have another €400 mill?

Later this week in Lucerne, Switzerland, the European Space Agency (ESA) will ask its 23 member states' ministers for a €400 million top-up to its ExoMars program. In an audio conference on Friday, director of human spaceflight and robotic exploration David Parker said the cash injection “includes all the technical work needed …
Datacenter, photo via Shutterstock

There's gold in them thar hills! Rackspace latest firm to join Frankfurt data centre rush

Rackspace has chosen Germany as home for its first data centre in mainland Europe. The managed cloud provider, which is to become an AWS and Microsoft Azure support partner, will jointly build and open a centre in Frankfurt next year. Rackspace is the latest to set up shop in Frankfurt, Germany's centre for finance and fifth …
Gavin Clarke, 24 Nov 2016
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CompSci boffins offer new bug-rating system to get you home on time

If you're in charge of a couple of thousand boxen, you can't patch every vulnerability report at once, so sysadmins will welcome help sorting out their priorities. That's what a couple of researchers hope to offer in what they call NCVS, the Non-Intrusive and Context-Based Vulnerability Scoring framework: making sense of the …
Wallisellen, Switzerland - 30 January, 2016: sign on the wall of the Cisco Systems GmbH office.  <a href="http://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-1322746p1.html?cr=00&pl=edit-00">Denis Linine</a> / <a href="http://www.shutterstock.com/editorial?cr=00&pl=edit-00">Shutterstock.com</a>

Cisco: Revenues are flat, profits are down, and we're not changing our plan

Cisco says it will continue its push into the services space as its revenues were once again down slightly. Switchzilla told investors on Wednesday that even in a "challenging business environment" globally, it was not going to change its plans to focus on automation, security and analytics as it moves away from its …
Shaun Nichols, 17 Nov 2016

Bong: Let me talk to Trump

¡Bong! The Mar-a-Lago Club is like the 1960s. If you can remember it, you weren't there. Let me be clear: I have no memory at all of any long, debauched evenings at the luxurious Miami mansion belonging to Donald J Trump. Not one. So that's cast-iron proof, if any is needed, of my uniquely close personal relations with America's new …
Steve Bong, 15 Nov 2016
New Zealand flag

CERN boffins see strange ... oh, wait, that's just New Zealand moving 2m north

New Zealand's been hit by two nearly-simultaneous earthquakes that left two people dead, isolated some towns, cut telecommunications links – and rattled the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva. The quake might also inconvenience infosec types visiting the country for one of the Southern Hemisphere's pre-eminent conferences, …
The Starship Enterprise

Rolling out flash in the enterprise? It's a matter of application

Flash SSD is changing the way that we store data. Vendors would like you to use it for all of your applications – and you probably will at some point – but which applications does it make most sense for today, and which might you have to work a little harder on to justify its use? Some rarified high-performance applications …
Danny Bradbury, 10 Nov 2016
Java image by Gil C via Shutterstock

Open-source Sesame! Alibaba promises super-size magic for Java

Online commerce giant Alibaba is among a crop of “new world” Java users seeking to shape the direction of both language and platform. Alibaba, one the world’s largest users of Java, has entered the race for election to the ruling executive committee (EC) of the Java Community Process (JCP). Jack Ma’s ecommerce giant joined the …
Gavin Clarke, 08 Nov 2016
A man holding a cup of coffee

Swiss, geez: Robo-hooker coffee shop to be erected in Geneva

A cafe owner from Switzerland is planning to open a coffee shop sex parlour staffed by robotic filles de joie. Bradley Charvet told Swiss newspaper Le Matin this week that he had planned to have his so-called Cafe Fellatio in Geneva staffed by human sex workers, but after running into legal hurdles he is now looking to …
Shaun Nichols, 04 Nov 2016
World's shortest international flight

World's shortest international flight: now just 21km in 7 minutes

Austrian airline People's Viennaline this week started flying the world's shortest international flight: a 21km hop from the Swiss town of St. Gallen to the German town of Friedrichshafen. The two towns are separated by Lake Constance and 66.1km of roads that Google tells us will take just 54 minutes to traverse. Along the …
Simon Sharwood, 04 Nov 2016
Flag of Iceland

Iceland's Pirate Party tops polls ahead of national elections

The Pirate Party looks set for a successful outing in the coming weekend's Icelandic elections. A poll by local newspaper Morgunblaðið and the Icelandic Social Science Research Institute of the University of Iceland reports support for the Pirate Party is running at about 22.6 per cent, a point-and-a-half ahead of the ruling …
Simon Sharwood, 25 Oct 2016

'Doubly unacceptable' Swiss vegan forces his way into the army

A militant vegan has succeeded in forcing himself into the Swiss Army – and avoided paying extra tax as a result. Antoni Da Campo, a “strict vegan and member of Swiss animal rights organization PEA” had previously been rejected from the Swiss Army because the army would not cater for his vegan diet and because he refused to …
Gareth Corfield, 20 Oct 2016

Post-referendum UK still part of Euro cyberterror stress test... for now

European enterprises are teaming with information security agencies and governments to run a pan-European cyberwar readiness exercise today. Cyber Europe 2016 - which involves thousands of experts from all 28 EU Member States, Switzerland and Norway - is being co-ordinated by European Union security agency ENISA. It's the …
John Leyden, 14 Oct 2016

'Pay once' FalconStor storage model causes scratching of heads

FalconStor has announced something that seems … well, odd; a “Pay Once” pricing model. The software-defined storage product supplier says it aims to disrupt global storage industry pricing practices which involve customers paying for the storage of their second, third, or more copies of data. Well, er, yes, you store the data …
Chris Mellor, 07 Oct 2016

Buggy code to the left of me, perfect source to the right, here I am, stuck in the middle with EU

Midway through SUPERSEDE, the EU three-year project backed by €3.25m in funding to make software better, software still sucks. It's always been thus, but now that computer code has a say in the driving of Teslas, confronts everyone daily on smartphones, and has crept into appliances, medical devices, and infrastructure, it's a …
Thomas Claburn, 04 Oct 2016

Swiss vote for spy powers

Switzerland has decisively voted in new surveillance laws granting the country's law enforcement agencies powers closer to those in other western nations. The referendum vote passed with a 66.5 per cent majority on a low voter turnout, carried notably on the back of positive sentiment from the country's older voters. The laws …
Team Register, 27 Sep 2016
Wallisellen, Switzerland - 30 January, 2016: sign on the wall of the Cisco Systems GmbH office.  <a href="http://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-1322746p1.html?cr=00&pl=edit-00">Denis Linine</a> / <a href="http://www.shutterstock.com/editorial?cr=00&pl=edit-00">Shutterstock.com</a>

Cisco's head of enterprise networking bails

Cisco's senior veep for Enterprise Products and Solutions has left the company. Robert Soderbery posted news of his departure on LinkedIn, where he attributed his move to a seven year itch. “Seven has always been the magic number in my career,” he wrote, as “after 7 years, new callings beckon, new adventures to be sought. …
Simon Sharwood, 12 Sep 2016
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Equistone grabs stake in print services slinger Apogee

Private equity investor Equistone Partners Europe has slurped a stake in managed print and document services slinger Apogee Corporation. Maidstone-headquartered Apogee employs around 450 staff across 14 offices in the UK and mainland Europe selling hardware and managed services on kit from Canon, Xerox, Konica Minolta and …
Paul Kunert, 05 Sep 2016
Theresa May photo by Frederic Legrand COMEO via Shutterstock

Nul points: PM May's post-Brexit EU immigration options

Comment After a summer of vagueness, prime minister Theresa May is starting to define Brexit, with controlling immigration at the top of her list. That is likely to mean ending the freedom of European nationals* to work in Britain on the same basis as the locals – which will have a major impact on the many British IT employers who draw …
SA Mathieson, 05 Sep 2016
UK border control at Heathrow. Photo by 1000 words/Shutterstock editorial use only

Paper mountain, hidden Brexit: How'd you say immigration control would work?

At some point in the next few years we will be in a post-Brexit world, and the UK will have regained complete control of its borders. Or maybe not. At this juncture, it's worth taking a long hard look at how that might work. Spoiler: it won't. And that's because of two things, law and logistics. Those immediately affected by …
John Lettice, 22 Aug 2016
Flag of Iceland

Iceland beats England again

Iceland is the best place on earth to locate a data centre, according to real estate outfit Cushman & Wakefield's most recent Data Centre Risk Index. The (reg-walled) index considers the cost of energy, international bandwidth, taxes, political stability and other factors to cook up a ranking for data centre hosts. Iceland …
Simon Sharwood, 03 Aug 2016
The big split

Systemax flogs German sub to CANCOM

The break up of Systemax’s European operations may have just started after it brokered a “definitive agreement” to sell the Misco German subsidiary to CANCOM for an undisclosed sum. Under the terms of the deal, staff and customer lists will be transferred to the new owner. The deal is subject to closing conditions and is …
Paul Kunert, 25 Jul 2016
results

What's big, blue and red all over? IBM. Profit, z Systems down, cloud up

IBM today reported its second quarter financial results and the figures don't look good, with profits falling nearly 30 per cent. The venerable computing giant did perform slightly better than analysts expected, however GAAP revenues and profits are both down year-on-year. It's the 17th straight quarter of revenue declines for …
Iain Thomson, 18 Jul 2016
Pic: Shutterstock

Meet Riffle, the next-gen anonymity network that hopes to trounce Tor

Next week, top eggheads will unveil a new anonymizing internet tool that they claim is snoop-proof and faster and more reliable against attack than Tor. Dubbed Riffle, the system was developed by MIT and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland. It uses the same onion-encryption system as Tor, which wraps …
Iain Thomson, 13 Jul 2016
A group of people hold out mobile phones in a circle. Photo by Shutterstock

The truth about Silent Circle's super-secure, hyper-privacy phones: No one's buying them

It seems that the Blackphone, the handset created by Silent Circle and Spanish firm Geeksphone, isn't as popular as its makers would like. Geeksphone has sued [PDF] its erstwhile partner for $5m in a New York court, claiming that disappointing hardware sales have crippled the partnership and left the Switzerland-based Silent …
Iain Thomson, 06 Jul 2016
Data scientist image via Shutterstock

Brexit government pledge sought to keep EU-backed UK science alive

BREXIT Scientists and politicans have called on the Brexit government to keep funding EU-backed projects at current rates or risk becoming a backwater. Nicola Blackwood, chair of Parliament's Science and Technology Committee, urged the Brexit Government to move quickly to reassure scientists and their collaborators in the EU that the …
Katyanna Quach, 24 Jun 2016

EU GDPR compliance still a thing for UK firms even after Brexit

BREXIT Many UK businesses will still face the burden of complying with recently introduced EU data protection rules even after Thursday's historic Brexit vote. UK businesses will be subject to the upcoming GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation), which comes into effect in April 2018, regardless of the EU Referendum result, …
John Leyden, 24 Jun 2016
China keyboard, image via Shutterstock

Shareholders rubber-stamp Ingram Micro $6bn sale to Chinese firm

US-headquartered Ingram Micro edged closer to Chinese ownership last night when shareholders voted overwhelmingly to accept Tianjin Tianhai’s $6bn offer. The mega bid for the world’s largest tech distributor was made in February by the Far East company, a subsidiary of HNA Logistics which is itself a division of conglomerate …
Paul Kunert, 22 Jun 2016

All aboard the PCIe bus for Nvidia's Tesla P100 supercomputer grunt

ISC Nvidia has popped its Tesla P100 accelerator chip onto PCIe cards for bog-standard server nodes tasked with artificial intelligence and supercomputer-grade workloads. The P100 was unveiled in April at Nvidia's GPU Tech Conference in California: it's a 16nm FinFET graphics processor with 15 billion transistors on a 600mm2 die. …
Chris Williams, 20 Jun 2016
Girl and computer, photo via Shutterstock

UK's education system blamed for IT jobs going to non-Brits

Immigration is an issue swaying electorates around the world, including Britons, who will next week decide whether to leave the European Union and Americans, who will soon decide whether to vote for Donald Trump as president in November. While this is generally assumed to affect low-pay, low-skilled jobs, it can affect those in …
SA Mathieson, 17 Jun 2016

Google Research opens machine intelligence base in Zurich

Google has announced a dedicated machine-learning research group in Europe, based in its Zurich office. Dubbed Google Research, Europe, the office in Switzerland will give its engineers and researchers "the opportunity to develop products and conduct research right here in Europe, as part of the wider efforts at Google." In a …
stack of newspapers

Mossack Fonseca IT bod detained

A Switzerland-based IT employee of Mossack Fonseca has been detained by the Public Prosecutor in Geneva. The detention was first reported by French newspaper Le Temps, which cites a source close to the matter who claims he is suspected of having "brought out a very large volume of confidential data" of the law firm over "a …
Ireland map, photo via Shutterstock

Over Ireland? Bothered by Brexit? Find that new home for your cloud

As we all know, the cloud isn't an amorphous, non-geographical blob of computing. Which is a good thing, because there are plenty of legal implications around where your data lives and where it moves both to and from. The point is, of course, that as the cloud isn't just a cloud, your choice of provider is largely dependent on …
Dave Cartwright, 13 Jun 2016

Swiss effectively disappear Alps: World's largest tunnel opens

Tunnel nerds, rejoice. The Swiss are today celebrating the opening of the world's largest underground passage to mark its completion 17 years after construction began. The €12bn (£8.5bn) Gotthard base tunnel is 57km (35 miles) long and will overtake Japan's 53.85km Seikan railway tunnel to become the world's largest and …
Kat Hall, 01 Jun 2016
European commission photo via Shutterstock

Want a Brexit? Promise you'll sort out UK universities' £1bn research cash loss

Leaving the EU could mean UK universities lose a whopping £1bn research funding, according to report released by Digital Science today. Academics have already warned the UK that leaving the EU would hinder research. A letter to The Times was signed by more than 150 fellows from the Royal Society - including Stephen Hawking - …
Katyanna Quach, 18 May 2016
Bank vault

Transfer techies at SWIFT tell Bangladesh Bank: Don't shift blame for $81m cyberheist

SWIFT has firmly rejected Bangladeshi claims that mistakes on its part are to blame after $81m was looted from Bangladesh’s central bank. Bangladeshi officials claimed earlier this week that technicians from SWIFT had introduced vulnerabilities into the bank's network when connecting a Real-Time Gross Settlement (RTGS) system …
John Leyden, 10 May 2016

Microsoft fingered for Western Euro PC tragedy

Microsoft last year effectively murdered one part of the mobile PC market that was going gangbusters - Windows with Bing (WwB) - and unsurprisingly this is now reflected in weaker sales across Western Europe. The low-cost WwB portables reached distributors by summer '14, designed to counter what was seen as a growing threat to …
Paul Kunert, 27 Apr 2016
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Secret UN report finds WIPO chief 'broke procurement rules'

The secret UN report into the behaviour of WIPO boss Francis Gurry has found him guilty of “conduct... inconsistent with the standards expected of a staff member of the World Intellectual Property Organisation.” The chair of WIPO's General Assembly Colombian ambassador Gabriel Duque is still refusing to release the full report …
John Oates, 25 Apr 2016
Terminator

Blighty gears up for first UK Robotics Week

The acronymically-abundant UK Robotics and Autonomous Systems Network (UK-RAS Network) tentacle of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) has announced further events which will feature at the first UK Robotics Week from 25 June to 1 July. As we previously reported, the event is backed by the Royal …
Lester Haines, 19 Apr 2016
Sensor descends down a hole in the ice as part of the final season of IceCube. Credit: NSF/B Gudbjartsson

They Came From Beyond Our Galaxy And Landed In The Ice!

“Big Bird”, a neutrino spotted in December 2012, probably started its life nine billion years ago in a quasar far, far away: so says the international team of boffins who run the IceCube detector beneath the Antarctic ice. By 2013, the IceCube collaborators believed they'd spotted extragalactic events: now they believe which …

Australia should be the 'Switzerland of data', Cisco head hacker says

ACSC2016 Australia should become the 'Switzerland for data' Cisco chief security man John Stewart says. John Stewart. Image: Darren Pauli, The Register. The country is already attractive given its isolation, political stability and could with sufficient technology investment become a global data hub. "[Australia] is a very …
Darren Pauli, 14 Apr 2016

Hacking Team's export authorisation hacked by Italian government

The Italian government has revoked the blanket export license that allowed Hacking Team to ship its surveillance tools around the world. According to Italian outlet Il Fatto Quotidiano (here in Italian), the license decision applies to the company's Galileo spyware, formerly okayed for export to 46 countries. Last year's …