Articles about Surface

Heartbeat graph

Apps record your heartbeat but now you worry the Census will remember your name?

Australia will conduct a census on August 9th and for the first time will retain name and address details in the data set created by the nationwide data dredge. That's got privacy advocates worried that your data could be linked to multiple other government data sets, so much so that friend of The Register Jack Skinner has …
Simon Sharwood, 28 Jul 2016
Dead battery

Microsoft blames dying Surface Pro 3 batteries on software bug

Microsoft has admitted that the battery problems hitting some Surface Pro 3 owners aren't down to hardware failure, but rather a software issue. Redmond's support forums have been inundated with complaints about the high-end fondleslab's battery life. The problem only appears to affect hardware that uses batteries from third- …
Iain Thomson, 27 Jul 2016
Cookie Monster

BBC will ‘retain your viewing history’

Last week the BBC launched a mobile app, called BBC+, delivering “customisable content collections” to your phone or tablet. It’s a personalised service which requires an email address. Last year, when the corporation announced its plans for personalised services, it made several data protection promises. Specifically, Phil …
Andrew Orlowski, 25 Jul 2016
Shouting match

XtremIO heading for the bin? Total BS, thunders CTO Itzik Reich

Storage industry jungle drums heard by El Reg suggest EMC is axing XtremIO product line development and putting it into maintenance mode due to scalability and data availability issues. EMC vehemently denies this, saying it's absolute FUD. Three independent sources say XtremIO is headed for a maintenance-only retirement home …
Chris Mellor, 21 Jul 2016

All you need for quantum computing at room temperature is some mothballs

Much of the current research on the development of a quantum computer involves work at very low temperatures. The challenge to make them more practical for everyday use is to make them work at room temperature. The breakthrough here came from the use of some everyday materials, with details published today in Nature …

DDoS, the cloud and you

Private cloud computing can be a useful way to offload some computing overhead and manage your costs effectively. The switch to operating expenses from capital expenses, the elasticity, the business continuity benefits – they're all real. But so are the dangers of DDoS disaster. There's a problem with moving your servers and …
Danny Bradbury, 21 Jul 2016
The first color picture of Mars from Viking 1

40 years ago today the US govt sent a taxpayer-funded robot to invade an alien hostile world

Pics The surviving members of the Viking Mars probe team have been celebrating the 40th anniversary of the first probe to make it down onto the surface of the Red Planet, send back pictures, and perform scientific experiments. The Viking 1 lander hit dirt on Mars on July 20, 1976, 16 days late. The probe had been planned for …
Iain Thomson, 20 Jul 2016
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella

Microsoft Azure doubles up to $800m a quarter – and is wiped out by dying phone sales

Analysis All eyes were on Microsoft's cloud business today as it published its fourth-quarter and full-year financial results. Amid the numbers, Redmond boasted that its Azure revenues from the quarter were up 102 per cent year-on-year – we estimate the cloud service's revenue to be about $800m in total for the period. Meanwhile, …
Iain Thomson, 20 Jul 2016
Kepler

Kepler's K2 mission confirms 104 Earth-like planets

An international team of astronomers has confirmed a treasure trove of new exoplanets spotted by NASA's Kepler spacecraft during its K2 mission. Kepler was launched in 2009 to search for Earth-like planets around Sun-like stars. Scientists describe the region where an exoplanet might be the right distance away from a star to …
Katyanna Quach, 19 Jul 2016

Boffins unveil 500TB/in2 disk. Yeah, it's made of chlorine. -196˚C, why?

Nano-tech scientists have managed to create the world’s smallest hard disk. The 500TB/inch2 disk can store a kilobyte of memory in a few tiny chlorine atoms, according to new research published in Nature Nanotechnology. Atomic memory is an attractive idea as only a few nanometres of space are needed to store a bit. A team of …
Katyanna Quach, 18 Jul 2016
Docker logo

Containers rated more secure than conventional apps

Containers are more secure than apps running on a bare OS and organisations that like not being hacked therefore need to seriously consider a move, according to analyst firm Gartner. Analyst Jeorg Fritsch, in a new document titled How to Secure Docker Containers in Operation says “Gartner asserts that applications deployed in …
Simon Sharwood, 15 Jul 2016

Microsoft silently kills dev backdoor that boots Linux on locked-down Windows RT slabs

Microsoft has quietly killed a vulnerability that can be exploited to unlock ARM-powered Windows RT tablets and boot non-Redmond-approved operating systems. The Register has learned that one of the security holes addressed this week in the July edition of Microsoft's Patch Tuesday closes a backdoor left in Windows RT by its …
Shaun Nichols, 15 Jul 2016
Dwarf planet 2015 RR245

Newly spotted distant dwarf planet orbits the Sun every 700 years

Astroboffins are excited about a newly-discovered dwarf planet, despite not knowing what it looks like. The discovery of 2015 RR245 comes from the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS), which back in March spotted alignments in Kuiper Belt Objects that fuelled the controversial “planet X” theory. The new object has so …
Partnership

IBM caps '20 years' of deep MS love with Surface deal

IBM has become the latest sometime hardware giant to agree to push software giant Microsoft’s client hardware - years after selling off its own client devices business. MS device marketing general manager Brian Hall said in a blog post that IBM had joined the Surface Enterprise Initiative along with consultancy and contracting …
Joe Fay, 12 Jul 2016
Windows 10 waterdrops, photo by Anton Watman via Shutterstock

You can buy Windows 10 Enterprise E3 access for the price of a coffee

WPC 2016 Microsoft is moving into new as-a-service pricing and bundling territory with the full-fat version of Windows 10 Enterprise. Today Redmond announced it is releasing Windows 10 Enterprise E3, which would normally be reserved for big operations and sold via Microsoft's volume-purchase programs, at a price of $7 per seat per …
Gavin Clarke, 12 Jul 2016
Mars impact

Space prang of cosmic proportions blamed for giving Mars its moons

Vid A new study suggests the early history of Mars was incredibly violent and the planet's two small moons are the sole surviving remnants of what was once a shimmering halo. Mars has two moons – Phobos and Deimos (from the Greek words for fear and dread respectively) – but they are tiny, misshapen planetoids, just 22 and 13km (14 …
Iain Thomson, 06 Jul 2016

By Jove! NASA's Juno prepares to slip into orbit around Jupiter

NASA's Juno spacecraft is set to enter its most critical stage as it attempts to fly into Jupiter’s orbit. At 4:18am BST, NASA’s Juno spacecraft will begin its orbital insertion burn, a move that will decelerate its velocity – slow enough to be captured by Jupiter’s gravitational field. The burn will initiate when the …
Katyanna Quach, 04 Jul 2016
Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

We'll smash probe into comet 300 million miles away for kicks, er, sorry, ... for science

The European Space Agency (ESA) has set the date for the Rosetta probe's deathday and says that on September 30 the spacecraft will crash into the comet it has been orbiting for nearly two years. With Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko more than 300 million miles from Earth and heading out toward Jupiter, the spacecraft's solar …
Iain Thomson, 01 Jul 2016

Fear and Brexit in Tech City: Digital 'elite' are having a nervous breakdown

Comment As Brexit sends London's tech sector and Silicon Roundabout into post-traumatic shock, and protesters out onto the streets of London, inventor Andrew Fentem wonders "what sort of hippy free-for-all is this anyway?" While some sections of the British press celebrate the Brexit vote in the UK, in the technology press there has …
Andrew Fentem, 30 Jun 2016
Veeam CEO Ratmir Timashev

Veeam poster boy and CEO Ratmir Timashev steps down

It's all change at the top of virtual server backup biz Veeam: Co-founder and current chief Ratmir Timashev is stepping back from day-to-day ops by letting exec veep William Largent grab the controls. Veeam said co-founders Andrei Baronov and Timashev, who becomes president, will remain "strategic" to the company but this will …
Chris Mellor, 29 Jun 2016
Image: Serazetdinov http://www.shutterstock.com/fr/pic-114819721/stock-vector-illustration-of-a-strong-blast-of-brain.html

Zero-interaction remote wormable hijack hole blasts Symantec kit

Scores (or thousands, or millions) of enterprise and home Symantec users are open to remote compromise through multiple now-patched (where possible) wormable remote code execution holes described by Google as 'as bad as it gets'. The flaws are "100 percent" reliable against Symantec's Norton Antivirus and Endpoint according to …
Darren Pauli, 29 Jun 2016
his low-angle self-portrait of NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows the vehicle at the site from which it reached down to drill into a rock target called "Buckskin." The MAHLI camera on Curiosity's robotic arm took multiple images on Aug. 5, 2015, that were stitched together into this selfie. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

The best way to find oxygen on Mars? Friggin LASERS, of course

A chemical camera sitting atop Curiosity, the Mars rover, has spotted signs that the Red Planet may have once had oxygen in its atmosphere, fuelling further speculation that it was once Earth-like. Today, Mars is a barren wasteland. Its surface is dry and caked in rust-coloured iron oxide dust particles – a stark difference …
Katyanna Quach, 28 Jun 2016
Micron 9100 NVMe HHHL SSD

NVMe SSDs tormented for months in some kind of sick review game

Review NVM Express (NVMe) is the next generation specification for accessing non-volatile memory such as flash. Traditional technologies such as SAS and SATA are just too slow. In order to demonstrate how much of a difference NVMe makes, Micron has provided 12 9100 NVMe flash drives, 800GB each in the HHHL (standard PCIe card) format …
Trevor Pott, 27 Jun 2016
Envisat

Down and out in the Middle Kingdom: Beijing is sinking

Beijing is one of the most water-stressed cities in the world, and research carried out using satellite interferometry shows one of the side-effects of that: the city is sinking. Not by a trivial amount, either: according to this open-access study in the journal Remote Sensing, the eastern part of the city is subsiding by 100 …
Johnny Carson as Carnac

Disco, Pogs, and the Microsoft Surface 3

Microsoft is wrapping up production of its Surface 3 tablet, with no successor in sight. The Redmond giant has confirmed reports that it will be ending production of the Atom-powered tablet at the end of the year and selling out its current stock of hardware. The Surface Pro 4 and Surface Book remain available. "Since …
Shaun Nichols, 24 Jun 2016
angry_woman_mobile_cropped_648

Dev boss: What will Microsoft do with Windows 10 Mobile? Surprise – it's for work!

One of the puzzles about Microsoft’s platform in 2016 is Windows 10 Mobile. In the run-up to the launch of Windows 10 in July 2015, the plan seemed to be that a unified operating system across PC and mobile, combined with applications developed for the Universal Windows Platform (UWP), would boost Windows Phone and create a …
Tim Anderson, 24 Jun 2016
Venus UV

Astroboffins discover rapid 'electric winds' blowing on Venus

A team of planetary scientists has found that an 'electric wind' whisks away water in Venus' atmosphere, which explains why the terrestrial planet is so dry, according to new research published in Geophysical Research Letters. Venus, the second planet from the Sun, has a thick atmosphere surrounded by hazy clouds. It is the …
Katyanna Quach, 20 Jun 2016
Nine inch iPad Pro and Smart Keyboard

Apple's 'lappable' iPad Pro concept is far from laughable

Road test “Lapable” is not a word I would ordinarily use, save for the fact that Apple’s applied it to the new iPad Pro nine-incher. The horrid word is an admission that the smaller iPad Pro is not a strong contender as a laptop replacement, but can do the job when required. And in my experience, a very decent job once you take the leap …
Simon Sharwood, 20 Jun 2016
Tim Peake gives the thumbs-up shortly before launch. Pic: Tim Peake

Tim Peake to return to Earth after six months floating around in space

British astronaut Major Tim Peake and the rest of the crew aboard the Soyuz spacecraft will be zooming back to earth after a six-month long mission in space. The spacecraft is expected to touch down on Earth around 0900 GMT. The journey back to earth is more dangerous than going into space. During re-entry, the spacecraft …
Katyanna Quach, 17 Jun 2016

Friends with benefits: A taxing problem for Ireland in a post-Brexit world

Britain outclasses anywhere in the EU for attracting inward investment, partly because it is in the EU, and Brexit will leave some of those tens of billions looking for a new target. Since Ireland already does well in this, Brexit could turn out rather well for the emerald isle. On the surface, a UK exit from the EU could mean …
Dominic Connor, 16 Jun 2016
Logs and an axe

Hackathons aren't just for hipsters

Glancing up from our smartphones, we catch sight of a world that has suddenly become almost entirely different. Surface appearances haven’t changed very much - buildings and cars and all that infrastructure - but behind the scenes nearly everything has been transformed. Everything … except for business practices. Those haven’t …
Mark Pesce, 16 Jun 2016
JC Boyle saluting device patent

Patent trolls, innovation and Brexit: What the FT won't tell you

Opinion In 2017, the EU is going to open the Unified Patent Court. This court will make it much easier for patent trolls and corporations in the US – armed with dodgy patent applications and IP attorneys – to reach into the UK and strangle your startup at birth. Think about it. Last week the Financial Times reported that two-thirds of …
Andrew Fentem, 15 Jun 2016
Antikythera Mechanism by https://www.flickr.com/photos/infanticida/  https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ CC 2.0 Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic

Boffins decipher manual for 2,000-year-old Ancient Greek computer

Scientists have examined hitherto-obscure inscriptions on the Antikythera Mechanism, a first century BC apparatus comprised of interlocking gears, and now believe the device could predict eclipses and the motion of the planets. The Antikythera Mechanism is a scientific and archaeological marvel, because nothing else like it …
Simon Sharwood, 15 Jun 2016
Flash Gordon

Sneaky brown dwarf gives us a bright flash and astroboffins are confused

Astronomers have discovered a brown dwarf star emitting flashes of light brighter than the Sun – even though it's not supposed to be able to do that. Brown dwarves are also known as “failed stars” since they do not generate enough energy to support hydrogen fusion – a process that sustains a star’s brightness over millions of …
Katyanna Quach, 15 Jun 2016
An artist's conception of Kepler-34b which orbits a double-star system

NASA's astroboffins spot the largest ever Tatooine planet

A team of astronomers led by NASA have discovered the largest circumbinary planet on record, according to the American Astronomical Society. The research has been accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal with Veselin Kostov, a NASA Goddard postdoctoral fellow, as lead author. Circumbinary planets are sometimes …
Katyanna Quach, 13 Jun 2016

Bendy see-thru mobes? Materials scientists make nanofilm advance

Researchers have created a new flexible nanomaterial film that boasts a “world record” combination of transparency and electrical conductivity, making it an ideal candidate for roll-up touchscreens. Transparent nanomaterial films have been used for bendable screens before. Lenovo showcased its CPlus, a flexible phone that can …
Katyanna Quach, 13 Jun 2016

Chinese space station 'out of control', will do best firework impression

The Chinese space agency has apparently lost control of its Tiangong 1 mini-space station, which is expected to return to Earth as a fireball. The Middle Kingdom's state media reported in March that the space station's systems had been shut down and the platform was officially retired. Now there's word from the science …
Iain Thomson, 10 Jun 2016

Microsoft offers Surface-as-a-Service from its own stores

First Microsoft turned Office into software-as-a-service. It's currently transforming Windows into Windows-as-a-service. And now it's decided that its Surface Pro typoslab should become Surface-as-a-service, to help businesses buy more of the hybrid machines. Surface-as-a-Service, or "Surface Membership" to use its proper name …
Simon Sharwood, 10 Jun 2016

RIP ROP: Intel's cunning plot to kill stack-hopping exploits at CPU level

Intel is pushing a neat technique that could block malware infections on computers at the processor level. That's the 40,000ft view of the new safety mechanism, the details of which were published on Thursday. What's really going on is this: Intel's so-called Control-flow Enforcement Technology (CET) [PDF] attempts to thwart …
Chris Williams, 10 Jun 2016

Fiber optic cables prove eyes of glass squids are like invisibility cloaks

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have used fiber optic cables to reveal how glass squids turn themselves invisible, according to a paper published in the Journal of The Royal Society Interface. Glass squids are a type of cephalopod – a group which also includes the octopus – and encompass approximately 60 …
Katyanna Quach, 08 Jun 2016

Is Windows 10 ignoring sysadmins' network QoS settings?

An Australian sysadmin frustrated with his business' sudden loss of performance has sparked a conversation about whether Windows 10 is behaving badly on network connections. To jump well into the discussion thread that points the finger at Microsoft: “We have had reports now from several people, not all our clients, reporting …
MIlky Way

Astroboffins create music from SPAAAAAAAAAAACE

Astrophysicists from the University of Birmingham have captured ‘sounds’ from the oldest stars in the Milky Way in a bid to study how the galaxy formed, according to research published today in the Royal Astronomical Society journal Monthly Notices. Strictly speaking, there is no sound in space since it is almost a perfect …
Katyanna Quach, 07 Jun 2016

Aquaboffins sink lost Greek city theory

Greek and British scientists have announced that submerged remains off the Ionian island of Zakynthos bearing an uncanny resemblance to a lost city are in fact natural formations. Professor Julian Andrews, of the University of East Anglia's (UEA) School of Environmental Sciences, explained: "The site was discovered by …
Lester Haines, 03 Jun 2016
Pluto

Plutonian 'lava lamp' seas give dwarf planet a regular face lift

Pics and video NASA has released the most detailed pictures we're likely to get from the New Horizons probe flying past Pluto, and they show the planet displaying habits most commonly associated with 60s décor. Earlier pictures from the probe show a smooth and shiny area on Pluto's surface dubbed Sputnik Planum, consisting of polygon cells …
Iain Thomson, 02 Jun 2016

Swiss effectively disappear Alps: World's largest tunnel opens

Tunnel nerds, rejoice. The Swiss are today celebrating the opening of the world's largest underground passage to mark its completion 17 years after construction began. The €12bn (£8.5bn) Gotthard base tunnel is 57km (35 miles) long and will overtake Japan's 53.85km Seikan railway tunnel to become the world's largest and …
Kat Hall, 01 Jun 2016

Oracle eBusiness Suite has 'huge, massive, ginormous' pwn surface

Auscert Oracle has a 'huge, massive, ginormous' attack surface, according to one prolific and proven researcher who reckoned he gave up looking because there are too many vulns. The security tester (who requested anonymity because his presentation wasn't approved by his employer) for one of the biggest tech firms found 50 …
Darren Pauli, 01 Jun 2016
dumb_and_dumber_648

Water divining project abandoned after blowing AU$60k

Two Australian councils are out-of-pocket after funding an attempt to use water divining to help top up Lake Albert near the southern NSW town of Wagga Wagga. Lake Albert is a popular watersports location in the Riverina, but it suffers heavy evaporation losses and in summer, it can lose 25 per cent of its water. That led the …
Oxford campus photo by shutterstock

Brexit? Cutting the old-school ties would do more for Brit tech world

Opinion In the early 2000s the United Kingdom was the powerhouse of European science and innovation. For many young, aspiring scientists from continental Europe, this meant coming here to world-leading institutes and universities to pursue research not possible in the constraints of their home countries. In comparison to, especially, …
Boris Adryan, 31 May 2016
Earth

Earth's core is younger than its crust surface

Back in the early 1960s, physicist Richard Feynman remarked that the centre of the Earth had to be a little younger than the surface, since it would experience gravitational time dilation. Now, boffins from two Danish universities have put a value to that difference, and while they agree with his hypothesis, they've corrected …

Surface Book nightmare: Microsoft won't fix 'Sleep of Death' bug

Hands-on In its most recent quarterly earnings report, Microsoft highlighted its increasingly popular Surface line as the growth leader in its More Personal Computing line of business. Surface led the category with 61 per cent growth in constant currency, a rise driven by the top products in the line, the Surface Pro 4 tablet and the …
Addison Snell, 27 May 2016