Articles about Sparc

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U wot M8? Oracle chip designers quietly work on new SPARC CPU

Oracle engineers are seemingly working on a new SPARC processor: the M8. This is judging from a series of patches submitted by Oracle developer Jose Marchesi to the widely used free-as-in-freedom compiler toolkit GCC. The code "adds support for the SPARC M8 processor to GCC. The SPARC M8 processor implements the Oracle SPARC …
Shaun Nichols, 5 Jul 2017
Clothes_iron

Oracle and Fujitsu SPARC up M12 big iron

Updated Oracle and Fujitsu have launched Fujitsu’s SPARC M12 server, claiming the world’s fastest per-core performance. It is the follow-on to the existing M10 server line, which topped out with the Fujitsu M10-4S server which scaled up to 64 processors and 64 TB of memory. The largest M12 configuration is 32 processors and 32TB of …
Chris Mellor, 4 Apr 2017
Oracle logo, image by GongTo via Shutterstock

Oracle teases 'easy-to-absorb' platform updates, wants 'all' your infrastructure biz

Oracle's popped out a short explanation for the sketchy SPARC/Solaris roadmap it slipped out in January. That roadmap mentioned “SPARC next” and “SPARC next+” without offering much detail other than a promise of faster speeds and bandwidth, more cache and updates to “software in silicon”. Now John Fowler, Oracle's executive …
Simon Sharwood, 14 Feb 2017

Oracle lied: Database giant is axing hundreds of staff – at least 450 in its hardware div

Oracle will cut hundreds of jobs from its embattled hardware division in California, a move the tech goliath had previously denied. About 450 people from the company's hardware operation in Santa Clara will get pink slips, according to a letter from Oracle to the California Employment Development Department seen by The Mercury …
Shaun Nichols, 23 Jan 2017
Oracle logo, image by GongTo via Shutterstock

Solaris 12 disappears from Oracle's roadmap

In late 2016, The Register received credible-but-ultimately-unverifiable reports that Oracle was scaling back Solaris development, perhaps with significant sackings. We chose not to publish because Oracle denied the specific allegations we'd received. We’re aware of rumours about the demise of Solaris. Our best efforts have …
Simon Sharwood, 18 Jan 2017

Fujitsu: Why we chose 64-bit ARM over SPARC for our exascale super

Hot Chips Fujitsu chose 64-bit ARM CPU cores for its upcoming exascale supercomputer for two reasons: Linux and the ability to customize its own processors. It was a bit of a surprise when the Japanese IT giant picked ARMv8-A over SPARC64 and x86 for its Post-K beast, which will be used by Japanese boffins to carry out climate-change …
Chris Williams, 23 Aug 2016

InfiniBand-on-die MIA in Oracle's new 'Sonoma' Sparc S7 processor

Oracle's Sparc S7 processor codenamed Sonoma will not feature on-chip InfiniBand interfaces as expected. The CPU, designed for scale-out systems and revealed in detail by The Register in August, was due to sport an integrated InfiniBand controller capable of shoveling 28GBit/s directly between the processor and other nodes and …
Chris Williams, 29 Jun 2016

Oracle gives apps a ticket to ride on Sparc M7's SQL warp drives

Oracle will today release, in its words, "a free and open API and developer kit" for the hardware-accelerated SQL-crunching engines in its Sparc M7 processors. You can register to grab the goodies, here. "We're opening up the interfaces to enable programmers using C/C++, Java and Python to effectively use these accelerators," …

Oracle's Larry Ellison claims his Sparc M7 chip is hacker-proof – Errr...

Analysis Oracle insists it really is going to sell computers powered by Sparc M7 processors – the same chips it started talking about in 2014. On Monday, Big Red breathlessly unveiled hardware powered by the beefy microprocessor, and on Tuesday, its supremo Larry Ellison lauded the 64-bit CPU's security defenses. One of these defenses …
Chris Williams, 28 Oct 2015

Blueprints revealed: Oracle crams Sparc M7 and InfiniBand into cheaper 'Sonoma' chips

Hot Chips 2015 Oracle revealed on Monday the details of its new bargain-basement Sparc processor code-named Sonoma. The blueprints were shown at this year's Hot Chips semiconductor conference in Cupertino, California – and we've got a copy of the slides. Sonoma is billed as a "low-cost Sparc processor for enterprise workloads," that you're …
Chris Williams, 24 Aug 2015
Fujitsu-Oracle Athena server logo

Debian Project holds Sparc port's hand, switches off life support

Following years of waning popularity, the Debian GNU/Linux Project has dropped support for the Sparc architecture, effective immediately. "As Sparc isn't exactly the most alive architecture anymore," Debian maintainer Joerg Jaspert wrote in a mailing list post last week, "not in [Debian 8.x] jessie and unlikely to be in [ …
Neil McAllister, 27 Jul 2015
Lego Godzilla

Intel raises memory deflector shields in Xeon E7 processor refresh

Intel has given its Xeon E7 processor family its annual refresh, this time emphasising analytics at scale. The new E7-8800/4800 v3 chips use the Haswell micro-architecture, meaning all Chipzilla's Xeons have made the jump. Intel's been a bit cagey, and did not share the list of E7 v3 models as we were going to press, but we' …
Larry Ellison on stage at the launch of Oracle's X5 engineered systems range

The firm that swallowed the Sun: Is Oracle happy as Larry with hardware and systems?

Oracle-Sun anniversary One Sun swallow doesn’t make a hardware summer, and while it certainly hasn’t for Oracle, it is far from being in a hardware winter for the firm. Oracle's gulp of Sun Microsystems on 27 January 2010 – five years ago today – has resulted in a generally flagging Sun hardware product business and the growing Engineered System …
Chris Mellor, 27 Jan 2015
Larry Ellison

Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER

OpenWorld During his OpenWorld keynote on Sunday, Oracle CEO CTO Larry Ellison took time out from talking up his company's cloud strategy to remind the audience that the database giant is in the hardware business, too – all the way down to the silicon. Many of Oracle's "engineered systems" are powered by Intel processors – and Intel …
Neil McAllister, 29 Sep 2014
The die of Oracle's SPARC M7 CPU

Oracle reveals 32-core, 10 BEEELLION-transistor SPARC M7

Oracle has revealed details of its next-generation SPARC CPU, the M7. As John Fowler, Oracle's executive veep of systems predicted when chatting to The Reg last month, the company took the wraps off the M7 at last week's Hot Chips CPU-fest and filled it with goodies to make Oracle software go faster. Under the hood of the CPU …
Simon Sharwood, 18 Aug 2014
Oracle's SPARC and Solaris roadmap

Seventh-gen SPARC silicon will accelerate Oracle databases

Oracle will soon detail the SPARC 7 architecture, and how it includes new in-silicon features designed to make Big O's databases and applications achieve better performance in an all-Ellison environment. John Fowler, Oracle's executive veep of systems, today told The Reg that the company will reveal details of the new silicon …
Simon Sharwood, 17 Jul 2014
Larry Ellison, photo by Oracle Corporate Communications

SPARC and Solaris will live until at least 2019

Oracle has quietly published a roadmap for its legacy Sun SPARC and Solaris platforms. Big Red's not offered a whole lot of detail, confining itself to the single slide below. The slide is available here as a PDF or as an embiggened image here. Oracle's SPARC and Solaris roadmap Oracle's SPARC and Solaris roadmap. Bigger …
Larry Ellison

Oracle's Ellison talks up 'ungodly speeds' of in-memory database. SAP: *Cough* Hana

OpenWorld Oracle headman Larry Ellison kicked off this year's OpenWorld conference on Sunday by touting the lightning-fast performance of the Oracle 12c database's new in-memory database caching option, and he brought along some brand-new hardware to prove his point. In-memory databases are nothing new, of course. SAP has long flaunted …
Neil McAllister, 23 Sep 2013

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