Articles about Software Industry

phishing_648

Clash of Kings hack: 1.8m hit

The forums for hit mobile game Clash of Kings have been hacked, with 1.6 million usernames, email addresses, IP addresses and access tokens swiped, apparently. Account passwords were also taken but they were stored salted and hashed, we're told. The forums have since been taken offline for "maintenance." Clash of Kings is …
Team Register, 23 Jul 2016

Cubesats, balloons, and rockets: Top prof takes us to new space

Reg Lecture If you fancy leaving the turmoil of Earth for a bit, don’t worry. Leaving the planet may be about to get much much easier – so long as you don’t mind the company of Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos. That was one conclusion from last week’s splendid Reg Summer Lecture, courtesy of International Space University’s Professor Chris Welch …
Joe Fay, 29 Jun 2016
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Adjust your Facebook, Twitter privacy settings, judge tells jurors in Oracle-Google Java trial

The judge in the long-running Oracle-Google copyright lawsuit has advised jurors to adjust the privacy settings on their social media outlets – noting, "I can't control the press," and warning that story-seeking journalists would look them up. Judge Alsup addressed the juror pool this morning in San Francisco as lawyers from …
Kieren McCarthy, 09 May 2016
Claw hammer

Delphix appoints new CEO – but hasn't filled vacant CTO spot

Structured data copy virtualising startup Delphix has appointed Chris Cook as president and CEO, with founding CEO Jedidiah Yueh become executive chairman of the board. Why? Cook has been president and COO of New Relic since September 2011, joining from CA where he held exec-level positions since 2005. He was a sales VP at …
Chris Mellor, 19 Apr 2016
Penguin wedding cake, image via Shutterstock

Linux is so grown up, it's ready for marriage with containers

Linux is all grown up. It has nothing left to prove. There's never been a year of the Linux desktop and there probably never will be, but it runs on the majority of the world's servers. It never took over the desktop, it did an end-run around it: there are more Linux-based client devices accessing those servers than there are …
Liam Proven, 07 Apr 2016

Micro Focus spends $540m to add Serena its software brand museum

Micro Focus International is splashing out $540m to scoop up Serena Software – or more specifically, its recurring maintenance revenues, to add to its stable of once great, now slightly dusty software brands. LSE-listed mainframe specialist Micro Focus is simultaneously raising $216m in a placing to help pay for the deal, …
Joe Fay, 22 Mar 2016
Bear

Oracle fights Russian software policy with Postgres smear

Oracle's Russian paw has found a way to fight the nation's regulations about software purchasing for government agencies, by sending local customers a letter containing stern criticisms of PostgreSQL. As of January 1st 2016, Russia's government agencies are required to use locally-produced software whenever it is functionally …
Simon Sharwood, 21 Mar 2016
Bruce Schneier

Global crypto survey proves govt backdoors completely pointless

In 1999, when a fierce crypto war was raging between governments and developers, researchers undertook a global survey of available encryption products. Now security guru Bruce Schneier and other experts have repeated the exercise, and it spells bad news for those demanding backdoors in today's cryptography. The latest study …
Iain Thomson, 11 Feb 2016
Green Cross Code

Stop, look, listen: Don't be 2016's DevOps roadkill – here's how to survive

Search the term “DevOps” online and you get a plethora of stuff. The problem is not lack of content – the problem is sifting the wheat from the chaff. Navigating your way through can be both daunting and confusing. This in turn makes it a challenge to know where and how to get started. Those purveying DevOps need to offer a …
Bola Rotibi, 15 Jan 2016

Samba man 'Tridge' accidentally helps to sink request for Oz voteware source code

Dr Andrew Tridgell, creator of the Samba file server and the rsync algorithm, appears to have inadvertently helped to sink a freedom of information (FOI) request for access to the source code of software used to count votes in Australian elections. Tridgell was called as a witness by Hobart lawyer Michael Cordover, who sought …
Simon Sharwood, 13 Dec 2015

TorrentLocker scum have better email lists than legit devs, telcos

Spammers deploying the TorrentLocker ransomware are so good at targeting victims that their poison emails hit the mark more frequently than those sent by legitimate software companies and professional marketers. Trend Micro's just analysed the malware in a report titled TorrentLocker Landscape: Targeting Even More Victims in …
Darren Pauli, 09 Sep 2015
Speed

Gone in 60 seconds – SimpliVity's new promise to the admins

Converged infrastructure "visionary" SimpliVity today released the third version of its modestly-named OmniStack Data Virtualisation Platform, the code that turns its collections of servers and disks into combined storage and compute rigs. This time around the emphasis is on ROBO. No, silly, not anthropogenic automata, but …
Simon Sharwood, 26 Aug 2015
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Microsoft enterprise reseller SoftwareOne bags private equity investor

Volume licensing transaction engine SoftwareOne has sold a minority stake to private equity investor KKR for an undisclosed sum, the companies confirmed today. Challenges facing the Microsoft enterprise reseller – AKA a Licensing Solution Partner – are multiple, not least the proliferation of the cloud as more businesses …
Paul Kunert, 17 Aug 2015
Eugene Kaspersky in Sydney

Kaspersky: Freemasons coded fake malware in the Bermuda Triangle

Eugene Kaspersky has taken to his blog to make another stinging rebuttal of a Reuters report that alleged the company that bears his name deliberately sabotaged rival antivirus packages. “The Reuters story is based on information provided by anonymous former KL employees. And the accusations are complete nonsense, pure and …
Simon Sharwood, 17 Aug 2015

Citrix CEO retires as activist investor Elliott snatches the wheel

Citrix chief exec Mark Templeton has said he will retire, as activist investor Elliott Management takes a larger role in the company. Templeton joined Citrix in 1995 and has served as its CEO since 2001. But hedge fund Elliott has been among the most vocal in calling for change following what it describes as years of …
Neil McAllister, 29 Jul 2015
US Supreme Court

Supreme Court ignores Google's whinging in Java copyright suit

The US Supreme Court has declined to hear Google's appeal of Oracle's case against it in the matter of the Java API copyrights, leaving it up to a lower court to decide what - if any - damages Google owes. Google was hoping the Supremes would weigh in on the issue of whether software APIs are copyrightable under current US …
Neil McAllister, 29 Jun 2015

'Life in Mexico City is like a Simpsons episode, with worse trains'

The eXpat Files Tomorrow is Monday, which means another day in the office. Because we know some of you can't bear the thought of doing that again, each Sunday we bring you The eXpat Files, in which a Reg reader shares their experience of moving to another nation to pursue their career, and find interesting local snacks. This week's volunteer is …
Simon Sharwood, 02 Nov 2014
CP/M-86

Proprietary OS source code LEAKED to web – from 40 years ago

Forty years after Gary Kildall released the first version of CP/M, the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California has made the source code to several versions of the landmark eight-bit OS available as a free download from its website. The code, which is written in a combination of assembly language and Kildall's …
Neil McAllister, 02 Oct 2014

Yahoo! Slurps! Indian! Google! Docs! Lookalike!

Yahoo! has picked up Bangalore company Bookpad in a deal described as strengthening the Yahoo! Mail service. Bookpad is responsible for a service called Docspad, an online file editing operation, which would give the Purple Palace a little bit of the kind of functionality people have learned to expect from competitors like Gmail …
Alistair Darling and Alex Salmond debate Scottish independence

Scottish independence: Will it really TEAR the HEART from IT firms?

Scots may vote to leave the United Kingdom, ending a union lasting 307 years, on 18 September. Until a few weeks ago, the referendum on independence looked like an easy win for those wanting to stay in the union - or to use the parlance of the campaign, "no" voters. But a surge in support has put those planning to vote "yes" …
SA Mathieson, 11 Sep 2014
Star Trek Into Darkness

Next blockbuster you watch could be rendered on Google: Star Trek fx biz Zync gobbled

Google has confirmed its gobble of Zync, a cloud-based special effects rendering service. "Creating amazing special effects requires a skilled team of visual artists and designers, backed by a highly powerful infrastructure to render scenes. Many studios, however, don’t have the resources or desire to create an in-house …
Iain Thomson, 26 Aug 2014
Dan Geer

CIA infosec guru: US govt must buy all zero-days and set them free

Black Hat 2014 Computer security luminary Dan Geer has proposed a radical shakeup of the software industry in hope of avoiding total disaster online. Geer played a crucial role in the development of the X Window System and the Kerberos authentication protocol, and is now the chief security officer of the CIA’s VC fund In-Q-Tel. And during the …
Iain Thomson, 07 Aug 2014

ARRRRR. Half world's techies are software PIRATES – survey

Almost half of the world's enterprise IT managers openly admit to using pirated software at work – at least a survey from a software industry association says so. A report (PDF) from The Software Alliance claims that during 2013, 43 per cent of all software in the world was installed without a licence, up from 42 per cent in the …
Jasper Hamill, 25 Jun 2014
Pixar's claw-worshipping Aliens

Pixar frees its production-grade RenderMan software

Pixar Animation Studios has decided to give away RenderMan, its flagship animation software used to create the likes of Toy Story, Wall-E and – less happily – Cars 2. The company decided on the freebie, which will apply only to non-commercial use, after last week releasing a new version of the software said to offer “ an …
Simon Sharwood, 04 Jun 2014

Watch this! The changing face of malware

Video Youtube Video The anti-malware software industry seems to be fighting a losing battle, with Symantec even declaring antivirus "dead". In this online tutorial Darryl MacGregor, principal technologist for information security at IT training biz QA, discusses the best strategies for protecting your information assets in the near …
David Gordon, 21 May 2014

Never mind the HORSE MEAT, trading standards cuts'll hurt IT crowd, too

The Federation against Software Theft (FAST) and the Trading Standards Institute (TSI) have said they're very concerned about standards budgets in England and Wales being slashed by an average of 40 per cent. While TSI is worried about the next horse-meat scandal or children being harmed by counterfeit toys if trading …

Nothing's as SCARY as an overly aggressive SOFTWARE PIMP

Something for the Weekend, Sir? "Fans, players and parents unite against England's 'rip-off' £90 World Cup kit" screamed the Mirror this week. "They think it’s all over... priced." Even after several thousand years of civilisation and organised commerce, it seems humans still don’t understand basic economics. Demand, not cost of manufacture, determines the …
Alistair Dabbs, 04 Apr 2014
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US Supreme Court Justices hear arguments in game-changing software IP case

The US Supreme Court is hearing arguments today in a case that could help to set a new standard for when software is eligible for patent protection. The nine judges are due to hear an hour's oral discussion on the Alice Corp v CLS Bank case, a patent lawsuit over financial software whose decision could come to affect …
A boat full of Fail

Collective SSL FAIL a symptom of software's cultural malaise

In the 19 years that have passed since the first implementation of SSL, you could be forgiven for expecting that the industry could do it right by now: and yet last week, not one but three SSL vendors were discovered to have implementation problems. Belkin was caught not checking SSL certificates; WhatsApp was discovered to have …

Top Microsoft bod: ARM servers right now smell like Intel's (doomed) Itanic

Microsoft is unlikely to use ARM-compatible processors in a meaningful way in its data centers – unless there is a huge change in the software ecosystem around the non-x86 chips, a top Redmond bod told The Reg. Though Microsoft is closely watching developments in the ARM world, it's unlikely that the Windows giant will be one of …
Jack Clark, 10 Jan 2014

NASSCOM appoints new boss to corral India's outsourcers

India’s all-powerful IT body NASSCOM has appointed a new head honcho to guide the industry to hoped-for revenues of $US300 billion (£183bn) by 2020. Former Indian telecom secretary R Chandrashekhar took the reins as president on Monday from the outgoing Som Mittal, who served from 2007. Unsurprisingly, he struck an optimistic …
Phil Muncaster, 07 Jan 2014
Supreme Court Building

US Supreme Court to preside over software patents case

The US Supreme Court has agreed to hear a patent case which some hope will have a profound effect on the software industry. The top US court on Friday said that it would review a lower court ruling in the case of Alice vs CLS Bank. The decision, say advocates, could have implications throughout the software industry. At issue …
Shaun Nichols, 07 Dec 2013
IBM logo

IBM opens up Power chips, ARM-style, to take on Chipzilla

With its embedded Power chip business under assault from makers of ARM and x86 processors – and to a lesser extent MIPS chips – and having lost the game console business to AMD, IBM had to do something dramatic to expand the addressable market for its Power processors. And that something, which Big Blue has just rolled out, is …
bug on keyboard

Crowdsourced flaw-finding cheaper than in-house bug hunters

A study into the once-controversial practice of vulnerability rewards programs (VRPs) – paying researchers bug bounties for reporting security flaws – has found that for browser builders, the practice is not only more effective at spotting problems that hiring code-checkers, it's also much better value for the money. "We find …
Iain Thomson, 10 Jul 2013

Hey, Teflon Ballmer. Look, isn't it time? You know, time to quit?

Analysis Those who upgraded to Windows 8 aren't the only ones unhappy with the new touch-driven operating system - Wall Street is too. Just don't expect any of the criticism hurled at Steve "Teflon" Ballmer, Microsoft's shy and retiring boss, to stick. The chief executive is under fire from money men who responded to tech reporters …
Gavin Clarke, 17 May 2013

India's 2020 vision: a $10 BEELION software industry

India’s all-powerful IT body NASSCOM wants the country’s burgeoning software industry to generate $10bn in revenue by 2020, in a move designed to "rejuvenate" India’s sprawling IT industry. The body’s newly unveiled 2020 plan will require India’s software market to grow its revenues almost five-fold from the estimated $2.2bn …
Phil Muncaster, 15 May 2013
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The software industry: So efficient, we invented shelfware

It has always amused me that we work in an industry that has built up such a bad reputation for overselling that we actually coined the phrase "Shelfware". To be fair and accurate about it, buyers are just as guilty as sellers here, and they often bulk-buy licences for software and services with little consideration, seldom …

Tech titans team up to push immigration reform

Analysis Some of the biggest names in Silicon Valley have formed a political lobbying organization, dubbed Fwd.us, to press for more H-1B visas for industry, a comprehensive revamp of the US education and patent systems, and a pathway for talented people now in the US illegally to gain citizenship. "In a knowledge economy, the most …
Iain Thomson, 11 Apr 2013
The Register breaking news

Spanish Linux group files antitrust complaint against Microsoft

A Spanish open source software users' association has filed an antitrust complaint against Microsoft with the European Commission, claiming that the company's implementation of UEFI Secure Boot stifles competition. Hispalinux, an 8,000-member organization that advocates for and facilitates Linux use in Spain, filed the …
Neil McAllister, 27 Mar 2013
The Register breaking news

Microsoft backs law banning Google Apps from schools

Microsoft is backing a bill in Massachusetts that would effectively force schools to stop using Google Apps, or any other service that uses students' data. "Any person who provides a cloud computing service to an educational institution operating within the State shall process data of a student enrolled in kindergarten through …
Iain Thomson, 08 Mar 2013
The Register breaking news

Microsoft, EMC, NetApp support Oracle against Google

Microsoft, EMC, and NetApp have joined Oracle in urging the US Federal Circuit Appeals Court to overturn an earlier decision in the landmark Oracle versus Google Java trial. The three companies filed an amici curiae brief on Tuesday – legal-speak for "friends of the court." Such briefs are a way for parties not directly involved …
Jack Clark, 20 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news

YOUR Cisco VoIP phone is easily TAPPED, warns CompSci prof

Computer scientists claim security vulnerabilities in Cisco VoIP phones allowed them to eavesdrop on calls and turn devices into bugging equipment. Ang Cui has demonstrated how malicious code injected into 14 of the networking vendor's Unified IP Phone models could be used to record private conversations - and not just those …
John Leyden, 14 Jan 2013
The Register breaking news

Tim Cook: Apple to manufacture Macs in US in 2013

One day after Apple's stock suffered its biggest hammering in four years, interviews with company CEO Tim Cook appeared in both video and print covering a broad range of issues, including Apple's plans to move some manufacturing to the US and Cook's reasons for showing iOS chief Scott Forstall the door. When asked by NBC's …
Rik Myslewski, 06 Dec 2012

OS/2 a quarter century on: Why IBM lost out and how Microsoft won

Twenty-five years ago IBM unveiled its master plan to reclaim the PC industry. In November of that year the first floppy diskettes of OS/2 version 1.0 trickled out. Microsoft had co-developed the software with Big Blue. The world would look very different if the plan succeeded. And the world was already changing significantly. …
Andrew Orlowski, 27 Nov 2012

China's IP boss says West distorts piracy problem

China’s IP boss has hit out at ‘unfair’ Western media reports criticising the country’s record on intellectual property rights and piracy, claiming that foreign tech companies wouldn’t build their kit in the PRC if the problem was as bad as it is portrayed to be. State Intellectual Property Office chief, Tian Lipu, admitted to …
Phil Muncaster, 12 Nov 2012

SAP trousers €1bn quarter in software sales, fumbles profit

Business is so good at software industry bellwether SAP that it felt compelled to pre-announce its financial results for its fiscal Q2. In the past three months, SAP broke €1bn in new software licence sales for the first time and posted its best second quarter ever. The preliminary figures show SAP on a roll, with its tenth …
European Union Flag

EU rejects Oracle secondhand software licence grab

An attempt by Oracle to stop the sale of secondhand licences on software downloaded over the internet was rejected today by the community's highest court. European Union Flag The court's ruling hinges on the EU directive on the legal protection OF of computer programs. Image by Dimitar Nikolov In its judgment today, the …
Drew Cullen, 03 Jul 2012
The Register breaking news

Clouds gathering on horizon for software devs, say wise men

The software industry will dissolve into a soup of micro-detailed web services delivered over the cloud by 2022, with IT departments reduced to “guiding” users to prevent them from leaking their companies’ crown jewels onto the net. That was the extremist version of the vision sketched out by a panel considering “The Software …
Joe Fay, 14 Jun 2012

China claims piracy at new low

The rate of software piracy in China dropped to just 38 per cent in 2011, according to new government-backed figures that are markedly different to those from the Business Software Alliance (BSA), which recently branded the country the world's worst offender. State-run newspaper China Daily proudly reported the figures, which …
Phil Muncaster, 28 May 2012
Union Jack

UK's '£1.2bn software pirates' mostly 'blokes under 34'

The BSA is again bemoaning the lack of deterrents for software piracy after the commercial worth of unlicensed programs in the UK for 2011 remained at £1.2bn, unchanged on the previous year. This equates to a piracy rate of 26 per cent as more than one in four applications installed on users' machines was illegal, the software …
Paul Kunert, 15 May 2012