Articles about Schools

City of Moscow to ditch 600k Exchange and Outlook licences

The city of Moscow has announced it's going to start ditching Microsoft, following a call by president Vladimir Putin for Russia to be more self-reliant, and is starting with an untried-at-scale e-mail system. The phase-out will start by replacing Microsoft Exchange servers and Outlook clients, on 6,000 of the city's computers …
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Earliest ever recording of computer-generated music is restored

Audio Kiwi boffins have claimed to have restored the earliest known recording of computer-generated music, from 1951. The recording, released today by the Guardian, opens with what the Guardianistas describe as the "staunchly conservative" national anthem, God Save the King. It was made by the BBC at the University of Manchester in …
Cambridge bikes photo MK Jones via Shutterstock

Turing, Hauser, Sinclair – haunt computing's Cambridge A-team stamping ground

Geek's Guide to Britain King’s Parade in Cambridge looks like the last street on earth to have anything to do with computing. On one side is an absurdly ornate college gatehouse in yellow stone and King’s College Chapel, which combines the barn-like shape of a tiny chapel with the scale and detail of a cathedral. The other side is lined by tall …
SA Mathieson, 26 Sep 2016
Monty Python dead parrot sketch

US tech college ITT is not pining for the fjords. It is no more. It has gone and met its maker

For-profit US-wide college ITT will shut down in the wake of a government decision to bar it from accepting federal student aid money. The technical training school said Monday that effective immediately, it will be ceasing all operations and terminating most of its staff. "The actions of and sanctions from the US Department …
Shaun Nichols, 06 Sep 2016

How much does your kid hate exams? This lad hacked his government to skip them

A teenager from Sri Lanka is in hot water after he admitted to hacking the website of the nation's president in order to get his exams cancelled. The local Daily News reports that the 17-year-old, whose name was not released, accessed the official site of President Maithripala Sirisena – president.gov.lk – and replaced the …
Shaun Nichols, 01 Sep 2016

Super Cali goes ballistic, IT school is hopeless: Tech boot camp ITT frozen by edu officials

For-profit college chain ITT Technical Institute is facing further sanctions as the US government and the state of California have ordered the school to stop accepting new students. Citing ongoing financial problems with the school, the US Department of Education (DOE) has barred the school from taking any new students who …
Shaun Nichols, 30 Aug 2016
Boy with a backpack hides his eyes and cries. Pic by Shutterstock

Shock: AT&T totally not OK with FCC saying it ripped off US schools

AT&T has issued a rebuttal to the FCC's July complaint that it overcharged schools and libraries in Florida for internet service. The US telco giant said in a policy blog post that the FCC's allegations it violated of pricing rules for the federal E‑rate service program were "factually wrong." AT&T had been accused of …
Shaun Nichols, 29 Aug 2016
Ireland map, photo via Shutterstock

Ireland looks like it's outpacing Britain in the superfast broadband rollout stakes

Comment How do Blighty’s future broadband plans compare to its Irish neighbour, which arguably has its sights on a much more ambitious target than BT? The UK’s state-subsidised broadband deployment scheme ends next year, with the scheme on track to deliver “super fast” coverage to 95 per cent of Great Britain. Plans for connecting …
Kat Hall, 29 Aug 2016

Australian States stutter in coding-for-kids bandwagon-jump

Australia's schools have gone crazy for coding, but kids in different states will be offered different programs that may use some, all or none of the national Digital Technologies Curriculum. The Register has tracked that curriculum's development, because most stakeholders in the local technology industries argued it was A …
Simon Sharwood, 17 Aug 2016
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Liberata in £43m buyout by Japanese firm OUTSOURCING Inc

OUTSOURCING Inc (OSI) – a Japanese player that does what it says on the tin – has acquired UK public sector BPO specialist Liberata for £43m. The buyer is has spread its tentacles via more than 70 subsidiaries into outsourcing across multiple industries including engineering, manufacturing, administrative and recruiting. …
Paul Kunert, 02 Aug 2016
The Mosque at the Taj Mahal, shot from within the Taj Mahal through the marble screens

Floods hit India's IT hubs, wash away some credibility

If your Indian suppliers aren't at their most responsive, or you've spent a bit of time on hold to a business process outsourcer over the weekend, look to the heavens for an explanation. Indians are certainly looking in that direction because the nation has experienced deluges in the last few days, with the result being floods …
Simon Sharwood, 31 Jul 2016
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AT&T fined for school gouge

US watchdog the FCC has fined AT&T for overcharging on the internet service it provided to schools in Florida. The Commission will take a $106,425 penalty from the telco after it was found to have violated laws limiting the fees it can charge for government-subsidized E-Rate service. The E-Rate Program rules state that …
Shaun Nichols, 28 Jul 2016
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Cortana expelled from Windows 10's new school editions

Microsoft has announced two new cuts of Windows 10, for schools. “Windows 10 Pro Education” and “Windows 10 Education” have been “designed for the unique needs of K-12 institutions.” That means Microsoft's voice assistant, Cortana, has been expelled. Kids will therefore be spared the brave new world of context-aware search and …
Simon Sharwood, 28 Jul 2016
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Why Agile is like flossing and regular sex

After roughly 20 years, agile software development has wheedled its way into most every developer's mind as The Way Good Software Is Done. Like flossing, while we can all agree agile is a good idea, we're not quite up to snuff on keeping all our teeth in our heads, so to speak. A recent Gartner survey [registration required] …
Michael Coté, 27 Jul 2016

Nitwit has fit over twit hit: Troll takes timeless termination terribly

Comment Twitter this week permanently banned a high-profile self-proclaimed troll, marking a possible sea-change in how the social network tackles its worst users. Baffling web celeb Milo Yiannopoulos was previously temporarily suspended from the service and earlier this year had his "verified" status revoked. Then after Yiannopoulos …
Kieren McCarthy, 21 Jul 2016

Google slammed over its 'free' school service

Two Swedish researchers have torn into Google's free school service, accusing the online giant of purposefully misleading users in order to continue profiting from the sale of children's data. Maria Lindh and Jan Nolin from the University of Borås have published a research paper [note: paid access] that digs into the policies …
Kieren McCarthy, 11 Jul 2016
Windows 10 by Anton Watman, image via Shutterstock

App-V birthday to you, Win10: Virty tools baked in Anniversary update

Microsoft is packing its desktop virtualization into Windows 10 Anniversary Update next month – but you'll need an Enterprise or Education agreement to receive it. From August 2, the client's release date, Application Virtualization (App-V) and User Environment Virtualization (UE-V) will come as standard for both the Windows …
Gavin Clarke, 06 Jul 2016
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Australia's ABC suspends presenter over 'Wi-Fi is dangerous' claims

Australian public broadcaster ABC has suspended the presenter behind its unscientific “Wi-Fried” Catalyst programme that aired earlier this year. Presenter Dr Maryanne Demasi of the popular science program swallowed wholesale the claims of scare-mongers like Devra Davis and Canadian opponent of Wi-Fi in schools, Frank Clegg. …
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RM: School spending on tech is soft, soggy and downright subdued

School spending on tech remains “subdued”, according to specialist education supplier RM at the half-way stage of its fiscal year 2016, ended 31 May. Revenue slid 3.8 per cent year-on-year to £76.8m, but excluding the disposal of SpaceKraft, which made sensory learning devices for children with special needs, sales fell 1.4 …
Paul Kunert, 04 Jul 2016
EIB, photo by EIB

EU Investment Bank will honour pre-Brexit deals – but don't gamble on new ones happening

The EU bank that has poured more than £34bn (€42bn) over 10 years into UK projects will honour its existing deals in the wake of last week’s Brexit vote. Projects signed off on in fields such as engineering, education and R&D are not in jeopardy, the European Investment Bank has told The Register. The EIB’s most recent …
Gavin Clarke, 30 Jun 2016
ETA telco cable contest winners

Loop Dreams: Top college talents showcase their skills … in cabling

Students from around the US gathered recently in Louisville, Kentucky to take part in a series of contests based on installing, maintaining, and troubleshooting lines for telco networks. The SkillsUSA Telecommunications Cabling Championship brought high school and university students together to compete in events including 25- …
Shaun Nichols, 30 Jun 2016
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NSW Education system fail: price rises, delivery slips, AGAIN

NSW TAFE might have canned the enrolment system imposed on it under the state's disastrous Department of Education IT project, but the rest of the system grinds on. The department now says the troubled Learning and Business Management Reform project won't be complete until the end of 2017, by which time it will pass AU$750 …
(Another) One of These Things is Not Like the Other, JD Hancock, Flickr, CC-2.0

Things ain't what they used to be... Find out how at The Reg Lecture

However it might look today, the world is not actually full of dumb, inanimate objects. Things might not be alive, but they are certainly digital, and this has profound implications for all of us. That's why on July 5, IBM inventor and Newcastle Uni visiting prof Andy Stanford-Clark will be joining The Register to explain what …
Joe Fay, 24 Jun 2016
EU egg timer, photo via Shutterstock

Why you should Vote Remain: Bananas, bathwater and babies

Comment I like this tweet: History of Europe: War War War War War War War Arguments about bananas. To be honest, I'll probably go with banana arguments. #remain — Pavilion Opinions (@pavilionopinion) 29 April 2016 Never mind any arguments about the UK being sucked into a superstate and whether that's a good thing or the …
Happy man holds flag of Israel. Pic: Shutterstock

Israeli cybersecurity boom 'sustainable', argues industry’s father

Israel cyber week The "father" of Israel's cybersecurity industry reckons the unprecedented growth in its security startup industry can be sustained. Isaac Ben Israel, who heads the Interdisciplinary Cyber Research Center (ICRC) at Tel Aviv University, estimates there are 400 cybersecurity firms in Israel. Together with more established …
John Leyden, 22 Jun 2016
Afraid of the dark, image via Shutterstock

Oz 'gifted education' program pitching WiFi, vax scare stories

An educational support group attacked for anti-vaccination views is also a fierce opponent of WiFi in schools. The group WiseOnes delivers programs for gifted students in 30 Victorian high schools, but it seems that state's Department of Education vetting didn't pick up its unscientific views about vaccination or WiFi. …
Space, image via shutterstock

Grab a pick: Space mining's the next generation gold rush

Space may be the final frontier, but it’s also site of the next landrush for the more buccaneering end of humanity, as new technology and new money change the dynamics of space exploration. Whether the prospect of Bezos and Musk reaching out beyond the planet thrills or appals you, it’s unquestionable that space is becoming a …
Joe Fay, 20 Jun 2016

Just a quarter of Brits trust businesses with our personal data

The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) has published a survey into the British public's approach to personal data, showing widespread distrust in others' handling of it. According to the commish himself, Christopher Graham, 2016's issue of annual research shows that "consumers are taking up the fight to protect their own …
Hand painted with EU flag shakes robot hand. Photo by Shutterstock

Forget about Brexit – let's talk Orbits, Digits, Robots

If you’ve had it up to here with politicos arguing how we should redefine our relationship with Europe, join El Reg at our summer lectures where we’ll be discussing how to redefine the relationship between Earth, space, technology and humanity itself. This year’s run will be kicked off by International Space University’s Prof …
Joe Fay, 13 Jun 2016

Space exploration: Are Musk and Bezos about to eclipse Gagarin and Armstrong?

Once upon a time exploring space required a mix of the “right stuff” and some serious aeronautical chops. Nowadays you’re as likely to need an out of this world ego and background in Silicon Valley financing. At least that’s one take on the modern era of space exploration - and you can explore the subject in depth and enjoy a …
Joe Fay, 07 Jun 2016
St. Thomas More Cathedral School work on their CubeSat. Pic: NASA

US computer-science classes churn out cut-n-paste slackers – and yes, that's a bad thing

Computer science (CS) students in the US aren't being taught properly, and their classes are too limited in scope, says one IT think-tank. The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) says that its most recent study [PDF] of curriculum in the US has found that not enough schools are offering computer science …
Shaun Nichols, 31 May 2016
Oxford campus photo by shutterstock

Brexit? Cutting the old-school ties would do more for Brit tech world

Opinion In the early 2000s the United Kingdom was the powerhouse of European science and innovation. For many young, aspiring scientists from continental Europe, this meant coming here to world-leading institutes and universities to pursue research not possible in the constraints of their home countries. In comparison to, especially, …
Boris Adryan, 31 May 2016

P-TECH education program trial expanded (but not evaluated)

Why is the Liberal party promising money to recreate vocational training on an American model, when Australia used to have a working vocational training system of its own? It'd be easy to blame Malcolm Turnbull, except that P-TECH pilots that began this year were kicked off by his predecessor Tony Abbott. The current leader of …

Should space be a biz-free zone? Join us on June 22 to find out

Wait. Can you hear it? Yes, it’s final countdown for The Register Summer lecture series, bringing space and robots to a connected home near you. Actually, the venue is the Yorkshire Grey, just down the road from the Reg offices. But we can definitely guarantee spending an evening with us will leave you a lot more clued up our …
Joe Fay, 27 May 2016
2001: A Space Odyssey

IBM invents printer that checks for copyrights

IBM has filed with the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) for a patent on a printer that checks for copyright violations. Big Blue's application describes a device that can check print jobs for text or images that have already been copyrighted, and then delete or block the infringing content from being printed. "The …
Shaun Nichols, 17 May 2016

US schoolkids deploy Earth-watching CubeSat

The pupils of St Thomas More Cathedral School in Arlington, Virginia, watched yesterday as their diminutive STMSat-1 was ejected from the International Space Station (ISS), marking the first time an elementary school CubeSat has been deployed into space. St. Thomas More Cathedral School work on their CubeSat. Pic: NASA …
Lester Haines, 17 May 2016

Destroying ransomware business models is not your job, so just pay up

COMMENT It's not your job to defend the world against criminals, so the decision to pay a ransomware demand is all about business. The likes of FBI Cyber Division deputy chief James C. Trainor disagree. The Bureau recently advised organisations not to pay lest they "embolden" criminals and encourage others to take start using …
Darren Pauli, 17 May 2016
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Mozilla wants Tor hole

Mozilla has filed an amicus brief [PDF] in a criminal case arguing that the US government should provide it with details of any security holes it knows about before it shares those details with others. The case concerns a public schools administration worker, Jay Michaud, who was charged with accessing a site that hosted child …
Kieren McCarthy, 12 May 2016

How to make a fortune in space? Start with one here on Earth…

We all know the ambition of Silicon Valley’s finest know no bounds - not even gravity. So it’s no surprise that some of the world’s finest business minds are training their brain power and considerable fortunes far beyond our own, rather limited world. That’s why on June 22, International Space University’s Prof Chris Welch …
Joe Fay, 12 May 2016

Australian Greens don't believe Silicon Valley can save the world

If there's one thing that Australia's two main political parties agree on, it's that replicating Silicon Valley on local shores is a Very Good Thing. The governing Liberal/National coalition and opposition Labor party are both advocating more spending on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) teaching and back …
Simon Sharwood, 12 May 2016
Higher Education and Further Education

US tech CEOs demand Congress programs US kids to be tech workers

A who's-who list of tech industry executives has urged US Congress to pump computer science training into the brains of American kids. The open letter, signed by more than 40 CEOs, board chairs, and company founders, asks all members of the Senate and the House to direct funding and support for programs that would create …
Shaun Nichols, 26 Apr 2016

El Reg Summer Lectures: Space, robots and digital homes

It’s time to light up your brains for the summer, with a series of Reg lectures that will power you from your robot infested home all the way to the solar system and beyond. It’s a great lineup of speakers with not one, not two, but three bona fide professors to exercise your grey cells, and get your brain beach ready. In …
Joe Fay, 26 Apr 2016
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Stop using USB sticks to move kids' data, auditor tells Education Dept

The Department for Education (DfE) needs to improve the way it handles the personal sensitive information of 20 million records contained in its National Pupil Database, according to the Government Internal Audit Agency (GIAA). The findings were revealed in the department's annual accounts for 2014/15, which were published …
Kat Hall, 22 Apr 2016
Teacher

SamSam ransomware shifts from hospitals to schools via JBoss hole

Cisco has warned that the SamSam ransomware that has been plaguing US hospitals is now menacing schools, governments, and other organizations that have not kept their JBoss deployments up to date. According to the networking giant's Talos security team, SamSam exploits a hole in server middleware JBoss to drill its way into …
Iain Thomson, 19 Apr 2016
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Canny Canadian PM schools snarky hack on quantum computing

Video The Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has humiliated a Canadian journalist who assumed he was clueless about quantum computing. Trudeau was attending a press conference at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario to announce $50m in science funding. A reporter jokingly asked him to explain …
Iain Thomson, 15 Apr 2016

Flying Spaghetti Monster is not God, rules mortal judge

A United States District Court judge has ruled that Pastafarianism, the cult of the Flying Spaghetti Monster (FSM), is not a religion. Stephen Cavanaugh, a prisoner in the Nebraska State Penitentiary, brought the case after being denied access to Pastafarian literature and religious items while behind bars. Cavanaugh argued …
Simon Sharwood, 14 Apr 2016
Reliance free internet from Internet.org

Half of Facebook's Free Basics users ditch the freebie web-lite service for the paid-for real deal

Internet.org aka Free Basics – Facebook's slice of the web for the developing world – has been controversial, but that isn't stopping the social network. The internet service requires a SIM card from a participating mobile operator, and grants free access to Facebook, BBC News, Dictionary.com, er, ESPN and a few other sites. …
Iain Thomson, 13 Apr 2016
Academic Complex of IIT Guwahati, including all the departments and centres,  on the bank of River Brahmaputra. Photo by Satyadeep Karnati

India continues subsidising elite IT schools

India has decided to continue very generous subsidies of the nation's Institutes of Technology (IITs), elite IT training colleges intended to produce a stream of high-quality graduates who build the nation's information technology industries. IITs are among the hardest tertiary education institutions to enter, anywhere in the …
Simon Sharwood, 11 Apr 2016
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GCHQ is having problems meeting Osborne's 2020 recruitment target

Blighty's surveillance and security agency GCHQ is facing significant challenges in meeting the government's targets for recruitment over the next four years. Last year the chancellor promised that 1,900 new recruits would be hired by the intelligence agencies by 2020 – with the lion's share expected to head to GCHQ in …
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It's nuts but 'shared' is still shorthand for 'worthless'

Even as Wikipedia hurtled past its 15th birthday back in January, it feels as though we haven’t really had the penny-drop moment about sharing that the user-created encyclopaedia proves over and again. Even though we know the best programmers are the most flagrant users of Google and StackOverflow, we still seem to think of …
Mark Pesce, 23 Mar 2016