Articles about Schools

Nitwit has fit over twit hit: Troll takes timeless termination terribly

Comment Twitter this week permanently banned a high-profile self-proclaimed troll, marking a possible sea-change in how the social network tackles its worst users. Baffling web celeb Milo Yiannopoulos was previously temporarily suspended from the service and earlier this year had his "verified" status revoked. Then after Yiannopoulos …
Kieren McCarthy, 21 Jul 2016

Google slammed over its 'free' school service

Two Swedish researchers have torn into Google's free school service, accusing the online giant of purposefully misleading users in order to continue profiting from the sale of children's data. Maria Lindh and Jan Nolin from the University of Borås have published a research paper [note: paid access] that digs into the policies …
Kieren McCarthy, 11 Jul 2016
Windows 10 by Anton Watman, image via Shutterstock

App-V birthday to you, Win10: Virty tools baked in Anniversary update

Microsoft is packing its desktop virtualization into Windows 10 Anniversary Update next month – but you'll need an Enterprise or Education agreement to receive it. From August 2, the client's release date, Application Virtualization (App-V) and User Environment Virtualization (UE-V) will come as standard for both the Windows …
Gavin Clarke, 06 Jul 2016
Scaremongering image from Wi-Fried

Australia's ABC suspends presenter over 'Wi-Fi is dangerous' claims

Australian public broadcaster ABC has suspended the presenter behind its unscientific “Wi-Fried” Catalyst programme that aired earlier this year. Presenter Dr Maryanne Demasi of the popular science program swallowed wholesale the claims of scare-mongers like Devra Davis and Canadian opponent of Wi-Fi in schools, Frank Clegg. …
 Good GCSEs should cost parents a Jesus-phone

RM: School spending on tech is soft, soggy and downright subdued

School spending on tech remains “subdued”, according to specialist education supplier RM at the half-way stage of its fiscal year 2016, ended 31 May. Revenue slid 3.8 per cent year-on-year to £76.8m, but excluding the disposal of SpaceKraft, which made sensory learning devices for children with special needs, sales fell 1.4 …
Paul Kunert, 04 Jul 2016
EIB, photo by EIB

EU Investment Bank will honour pre-Brexit deals – but don't gamble on new ones happening

The EU bank that has poured more than £34bn (€42bn) over 10 years into UK projects will honour its existing deals in the wake of last week’s Brexit vote. Projects signed off on in fields such as engineering, education and R&D are not in jeopardy, the European Investment Bank has told The Register. The EIB’s most recent …
Gavin Clarke, 30 Jun 2016
ETA telco cable contest winners

Loop Dreams: Top college talents showcase their skills … in cabling

Students from around the US gathered recently in Louisville, Kentucky to take part in a series of contests based on installing, maintaining, and troubleshooting lines for telco networks. The SkillsUSA Telecommunications Cabling Championship brought high school and university students together to compete in events including 25- …
Shaun Nichols, 30 Jun 2016
Cthulu springs from HP desktop printer

NSW Education system fail: price rises, delivery slips, AGAIN

NSW TAFE might have canned the enrolment system imposed on it under the state's disastrous Department of Education IT project, but the rest of the system grinds on. The department now says the troubled Learning and Business Management Reform project won't be complete until the end of 2017, by which time it will pass AU$750 …
(Another) One of These Things is Not Like the Other, JD Hancock, Flickr, CC-2.0

Things ain't what they used to be... Find out how at The Reg Lecture

However it might look today, the world is not actually full of dumb, inanimate objects. Things might not be alive, but they are certainly digital, and this has profound implications for all of us. That's why on July 5, IBM inventor and Newcastle Uni visiting prof Andy Stanford-Clark will be joining The Register to explain what …
Joe Fay, 24 Jun 2016
EU egg timer, photo via Shutterstock

Why you should Vote Remain: Bananas, bathwater and babies

Comment I like this tweet: History of Europe: War War War War War War War Arguments about bananas. To be honest, I'll probably go with banana arguments. #remain — Pavilion Opinions (@pavilionopinion) 29 April 2016 Never mind any arguments about the UK being sucked into a superstate and whether that's a good thing or the …
Happy man holds flag of Israel. Pic: Shutterstock

Israeli cybersecurity boom 'sustainable', argues industry’s father

Israel cyber week The "father" of Israel's cybersecurity industry reckons the unprecedented growth in its security startup industry can be sustained. Isaac Ben Israel, who heads the Interdisciplinary Cyber Research Center (ICRC) at Tel Aviv University, estimates there are 400 cybersecurity firms in Israel. Together with more established …
John Leyden, 22 Jun 2016
Afraid of the dark, image via Shutterstock

Oz 'gifted education' program pitching WiFi, vax scare stories

An educational support group attacked for anti-vaccination views is also a fierce opponent of WiFi in schools. The group WiseOnes delivers programs for gifted students in 30 Victorian high schools, but it seems that state's Department of Education vetting didn't pick up its unscientific views about vaccination or WiFi. …
Space, image via shutterstock

Grab a pick: Space mining's the next generation gold rush

Space may be the final frontier, but it’s also site of the next landrush for the more buccaneering end of humanity, as new technology and new money change the dynamics of space exploration. Whether the prospect of Bezos and Musk reaching out beyond the planet thrills or appals you, it’s unquestionable that space is becoming a …
Joe Fay, 20 Jun 2016

Just a quarter of Brits trust businesses with our personal data

The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) has published a survey into the British public's approach to personal data, showing widespread distrust in others' handling of it. According to the commish himself, Christopher Graham, 2016's issue of annual research shows that "consumers are taking up the fight to protect their own …
Hand painted with EU flag shakes robot hand. Photo by Shutterstock

Forget about Brexit – let's talk Orbits, Digits, Robots

If you’ve had it up to here with politicos arguing how we should redefine our relationship with Europe, join El Reg at our summer lectures where we’ll be discussing how to redefine the relationship between Earth, space, technology and humanity itself. This year’s run will be kicked off by International Space University’s Prof …
Joe Fay, 13 Jun 2016

Space exploration: Are Musk and Bezos about to eclipse Gagarin and Armstrong?

Once upon a time exploring space required a mix of the “right stuff” and some serious aeronautical chops. Nowadays you’re as likely to need an out of this world ego and background in Silicon Valley financing. At least that’s one take on the modern era of space exploration - and you can explore the subject in depth and enjoy a …
Joe Fay, 07 Jun 2016
St. Thomas More Cathedral School work on their CubeSat. Pic: NASA

US computer-science classes churn out cut-n-paste slackers – and yes, that's a bad thing

Computer science (CS) students in the US aren't being taught properly, and their classes are too limited in scope, says one IT think-tank. The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) says that its most recent study [PDF] of curriculum in the US has found that not enough schools are offering computer science …
Shaun Nichols, 31 May 2016
Oxford campus photo by shutterstock

Brexit? Cutting the old-school ties would do more for Brit tech world

Opinion In the early 2000s the United Kingdom was the powerhouse of European science and innovation. For many young, aspiring scientists from continental Europe, this meant coming here to world-leading institutes and universities to pursue research not possible in the constraints of their home countries. In comparison to, especially, …
Boris Adryan, 31 May 2016

P-TECH education program trial expanded (but not evaluated)

Why is the Liberal party promising money to recreate vocational training on an American model, when Australia used to have a working vocational training system of its own? It'd be easy to blame Malcolm Turnbull, except that P-TECH pilots that began this year were kicked off by his predecessor Tony Abbott. The current leader of …

Should space be a biz-free zone? Join us on June 22 to find out

Wait. Can you hear it? Yes, it’s final countdown for The Register Summer lecture series, bringing space and robots to a connected home near you. Actually, the venue is the Yorkshire Grey, just down the road from the Reg offices. But we can definitely guarantee spending an evening with us will leave you a lot more clued up our …
Joe Fay, 27 May 2016
2001: A Space Odyssey

IBM invents printer that checks for copyrights

IBM has filed with the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) for a patent on a printer that checks for copyright violations. Big Blue's application describes a device that can check print jobs for text or images that have already been copyrighted, and then delete or block the infringing content from being printed. "The …
Shaun Nichols, 17 May 2016

US schoolkids deploy Earth-watching CubeSat

The pupils of St Thomas More Cathedral School in Arlington, Virginia, watched yesterday as their diminutive STMSat-1 was ejected from the International Space Station (ISS), marking the first time an elementary school CubeSat has been deployed into space. St. Thomas More Cathedral School work on their CubeSat. Pic: NASA …
Lester Haines, 17 May 2016

Destroying ransomware business models is not your job, so just pay up

COMMENT It's not your job to defend the world against criminals, so the decision to pay a ransomware demand is all about business. The likes of FBI Cyber Division deputy chief James C. Trainor disagree. The Bureau recently advised organisations not to pay lest they "embolden" criminals and encourage others to take start using …
Darren Pauli, 17 May 2016
Man shouting through a mega phone with abstract communication icons in the background

Mozilla wants Tor hole

Mozilla has filed an amicus brief [PDF] in a criminal case arguing that the US government should provide it with details of any security holes it knows about before it shares those details with others. The case concerns a public schools administration worker, Jay Michaud, who was charged with accessing a site that hosted child …
Kieren McCarthy, 12 May 2016

How to make a fortune in space? Start with one here on Earth…

We all know the ambition of Silicon Valley’s finest know no bounds - not even gravity. So it’s no surprise that some of the world’s finest business minds are training their brain power and considerable fortunes far beyond our own, rather limited world. That’s why on June 22, International Space University’s Prof Chris Welch …
Joe Fay, 12 May 2016

Australian Greens don't believe Silicon Valley can save the world

If there's one thing that Australia's two main political parties agree on, it's that replicating Silicon Valley on local shores is a Very Good Thing. The governing Liberal/National coalition and opposition Labor party are both advocating more spending on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) teaching and back …
Simon Sharwood, 12 May 2016
Higher Education and Further Education

US tech CEOs demand Congress programs US kids to be tech workers

A who's-who list of tech industry executives has urged US Congress to pump computer science training into the brains of American kids. The open letter, signed by more than 40 CEOs, board chairs, and company founders, asks all members of the Senate and the House to direct funding and support for programs that would create …
Shaun Nichols, 26 Apr 2016

El Reg Summer Lectures: Space, robots and digital homes

It’s time to light up your brains for the summer, with a series of Reg lectures that will power you from your robot infested home all the way to the solar system and beyond. It’s a great lineup of speakers with not one, not two, but three bona fide professors to exercise your grey cells, and get your brain beach ready. In …
Joe Fay, 26 Apr 2016
dunce_cap_648

Stop using USB sticks to move kids' data, auditor tells Education Dept

The Department for Education (DfE) needs to improve the way it handles the personal sensitive information of 20 million records contained in its National Pupil Database, according to the Government Internal Audit Agency (GIAA). The findings were revealed in the department's annual accounts for 2014/15, which were published …
Kat Hall, 22 Apr 2016
Teacher

SamSam ransomware shifts from hospitals to schools via JBoss hole

Cisco has warned that the SamSam ransomware that has been plaguing US hospitals is now menacing schools, governments, and other organizations that have not kept their JBoss deployments up to date. According to the networking giant's Talos security team, SamSam exploits a hole in server middleware JBoss to drill its way into …
Iain Thomson, 19 Apr 2016
Justin Trudeau

Canny Canadian PM schools snarky hack on quantum computing

Video The Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has humiliated a Canadian journalist who assumed he was clueless about quantum computing. Trudeau was attending a press conference at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario to announce $50m in science funding. A reporter jokingly asked him to explain …
Iain Thomson, 15 Apr 2016

Flying Spaghetti Monster is not God, rules mortal judge

A United States District Court judge has ruled that Pastafarianism, the cult of the Flying Spaghetti Monster (FSM), is not a religion. Stephen Cavanaugh, a prisoner in the Nebraska State Penitentiary, brought the case after being denied access to Pastafarian literature and religious items while behind bars. Cavanaugh argued …
Simon Sharwood, 14 Apr 2016
Reliance free internet from Internet.org

Half of Facebook's Free Basics users ditch the freebie web-lite service for the paid-for real deal

Internet.org aka Free Basics – Facebook's slice of the web for the developing world – has been controversial, but that isn't stopping the social network. The internet service requires a SIM card from a participating mobile operator, and grants free access to Facebook, BBC News, Dictionary.com, er, ESPN and a few other sites. …
Iain Thomson, 13 Apr 2016
Academic Complex of IIT Guwahati, including all the departments and centres,  on the bank of River Brahmaputra. Photo by Satyadeep Karnati

India continues subsidising elite IT schools

India has decided to continue very generous subsidies of the nation's Institutes of Technology (IITs), elite IT training colleges intended to produce a stream of high-quality graduates who build the nation's information technology industries. IITs are among the hardest tertiary education institutions to enter, anywhere in the …
Simon Sharwood, 11 Apr 2016
GCHQ road sign

GCHQ is having problems meeting Osborne's 2020 recruitment target

Blighty's surveillance and security agency GCHQ is facing significant challenges in meeting the government's targets for recruitment over the next four years. Last year the chancellor promised that 1,900 new recruits would be hired by the intelligence agencies by 2020 – with the lion's share expected to head to GCHQ in …
Share button by https://www.flickr.com/photos/jakerust/ cc 2.0 attribution generic https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

It's nuts but 'shared' is still shorthand for 'worthless'

Even as Wikipedia hurtled past its 15th birthday back in January, it feels as though we haven’t really had the penny-drop moment about sharing that the user-created encyclopaedia proves over and again. Even though we know the best programmers are the most flagrant users of Google and StackOverflow, we still seem to think of …
Mark Pesce, 23 Mar 2016
Micro:Bit photo

Hands on with the BBC's Micro:Bit computer. You know, for kids

First look The BBC Micro:Bit will start rolling out to all year-seven pupils in the UK from this morning. What the kids will receive is a matchbox-sized single-board computer with 256KB of flash and 16KB of RAM, manufactured by element14. Yes, you read that right, the same amount of RAM as the Acorn-designed BBC Micro Model A of 35 …
Dominic Connor, 22 Mar 2016

UK draft super-spy law 'not fit for purpose,' say 100s of senior lawyers

IPB An open letter signed by hundreds of senior lawyers and several high-profile QCs (Queen's Counsels) has criticized the UK's Conservative government for pushing a surveillance bill that is "not fit for purpose." More than 200 lawyers, including several who have been closely involved in cases surrounding evidence from the …
Kieren McCarthy, 15 Mar 2016

Attackers packing malware into PowerShell

Microsoft's PowerShell has once again become an attack vector for malware, this time a file-less attack dubbed "Powersniff" by Palo Alto Networks. The attack arrives through e-mails containing Word documents bearing malicious macros, almost as if it isn't more than 15 years since the first macro viruses were let loose on the …
Asus Chromebook Flip

Don't fear PC-pocalypse, Chromebooks, two-in-ones 'will save us'

Growing sales of ultra-portables and Chromebooks will help to offset the drop in PC shipments. This according to a report from analyst house ABI Research, which predicts that between 2015 and 2021, notebook shipments will remain steady as Chromebooks and ultraportables (tablet convertible notebooks) take up an increasing share …
Shaun Nichols, 09 Mar 2016
classroom_shutterstock_648

Mathletics promises security upgrades after parents' security gripes

Mathletics, an e-learning platform for mathematics that is used by millions of school kids across the English speaking world, has admitted a coding error that meant kids’ login details were transmitted in the clear. Developers Australia-based 3P Learning said that the security snafu was down to a coding error, which it has …
John Leyden, 29 Feb 2016
chicago_crop_648

These Chicago teens can't graduate until they learn some compsci

The Chicago Public Schools district has become the first in the nation to make computer science training a requirement for high school graduation. The district, the third-largest in the US, says that starting with next year's freshman class (graduating in 2020), all students will be required to complete one credit in a …
Shaun Nichols, 26 Feb 2016
Simon Cowell, photo: s_bukley via Shutterstock

Oh TechNation. Britain's got tech talent. Just not like this

Opinion It was ironic that this month’s crowing Tech Nation report, which wrongly claimed the UK digital sector “was growing 32 per cent faster than the rest of the economy,” almost coincided with the total collapse of one of the sector’s biggest – and loudest – stars, Powa Technologies. Compiled by Tech City and NESTA, an innovation …
Marcus Gibson, 25 Feb 2016

Bug bounty hunters score big dollars and the boom's only just begun

Feature Nathaniel Wakelam made US$250,000 last year. In his second job, finding and reporting bugs to bug bounty programs. Wakelam's a 20-year-old high school and university drop-out who has become something of a poster boy for the bug bounty boom, a movement that sees the world's biggest companies pay guys like him tens of thousands …
Darren Pauli, 22 Feb 2016
UK PC repair shop

Shopping for PCs? This is what you'll be offered in 2016

The personal computer market has been in the doldrums for years, with global sales falling under 300 million a year, slipping nine per cent in 2015 alone. But there are also some rays of light in the market, as Intel's predictions of a sales rebound were confirmed by a nice little bump in sales over Christmas, due in part to …
Simon Sharwood, 15 Feb 2016

Bomb hoax server hoster reportedly cuffed in France

French police have arrested the operator of a log-free Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP) service allegedly used by a hacking gang responsible for making dozens of fake bomb threats to schools around the world. Les Gendarmes say they've cuffed Vincent Lauton, 18, allegedly operator of runs darkness.su which …
Darren Pauli, 15 Feb 2016
Pulsar, image via Shutterstock

The field at the centre of the universe: Cambridge's outdoor pulsar pusher

Geek's Guide to Britain A field full of bits of old wire and an abandoned garden shed: it doesn't look like the place where Nobel prize-wining research was conducted, pushing the frontier of radio astronomy. But it was. This is the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory, at Lords Bridge – site of a disused railway station just outside Cambridge – which …
Simon Rockman, 12 Feb 2016
Boy with a backpack hides his eyes and cries. Pic by Shutterstock

National Pupil Database engorged to 20 million individual kids' records

The UK Department for Eduction has enlarged its mega database containing sensitive personal pupil information to nearly 20 million individual records, according to a Freedom of Information response. The National Pupil Database contains a range of sensitive information dating from the year 2000, including name, postcode, …
Kat Hall, 12 Feb 2016

Council IT system goes berserk, packs off kids to the wrong schools

Brit families waiting to find out if their kids have been accepted into their secondary school of choice were bamboozled on Thursday by a computer blunder. Herefordshire Council's systems sent out a wedge of emails to parents offering their children places for the new school year – but the information was wrong. It appears …
Chris Williams, 12 Feb 2016
A Coachella School District bus

How one of the poorest districts in the US pipes Wi-Fi to families – using school buses

America's second-poorest school district is also home to a surprising IT program that has won it national acclaim. The Coachella Valley Unified School District, located east of Los Angeles in California's Riverside County, encompasses around 1,250 square miles of largely rural areas. It includes 20,000 students, most from hard …
Shaun Nichols, 10 Feb 2016