Articles about Quantum

Quantum leap: A good quarter for disk backup gear, and yeah tape's OK

Quantum’s first fiscal 2017 quarter – the three months to June 30, 2016 – showed revenue growth as the tape market stabilized and big deals came good. Revenues of $116.3m were five per cent higher than last year’s $110.9m. There was a net loss of $3.8m, better than the $10.8m loss recorded a year ago and the unfortunate $52.4m …
Chris Mellor, 29 Jul 2016

QLC flash is tricky stuff to make and use, so here's a primer

QLC flash primer Quad-level cell (QLC) flash stores 4 bits per NAND cell and is very tricky stuff to use, far trickier than TLC (3 bits/cell) which is harder to user than 2 bits/cell MLC which, you guessed it, is more difficult to use than 1bit/cell SLC. Why is QLC the hardest of all to use? It is the slowest to read and write …
Chris Mellor, 28 Jul 2016

All you need for quantum computing at room temperature is some mothballs

Much of the current research on the development of a quantum computer involves work at very low temperatures. The challenge to make them more practical for everyday use is to make them work at room temperature. The breakthrough here came from the use of some everyday materials, with details published today in Nature …

Google tests its own quantum computer – both qubits of it

A couple of years ago, a quantum physicist suggested to Vulture South that one of the best uses for quantum computers might be to model reality. Now, Google reckons its boffins have done just that. Science wants to model quantum systems because they lie at the heart of reality. For example, chemistry – where Google has chosen …
drawing of live cat and cat skeleton

Schrödinger's cat explained with neutrinos

Physicists have found that neutrinos keep their quantum weirdness over the longest distance that quantum mechanics has been tested to date. Superposition is a fundamental theory in quantum mechanics. The idea that particles can exist simultaneously in many different states was famously compared to a thought experiment devised …
Katyanna Quach, 20 Jul 2016
Icefield

Spectra Logic preserves black pearls in Amazon's deep freeze

Spectra Logic has added direct archive to Amazon's S3-accessed public cloud from its BlackPearl object storage gateway. Spectra is a tape storage company that has been and is evolving into a more general nearline and archive storage supplier encompassing on-premises object storage, tape and nearline disk media, and Amazon's …
Chris Mellor, 20 Jul 2016
A bottle of burned naphtalene

Oz boffins cook quantum computing out of mothballs

A Sydney University researcher has burned naphthalene to create a material that can hold quantum qubit information at room temperatures. While the world has both quantum storage and quantum gates, albeit at small scales, even performing a simple Boolean AND operation on qubits is best undertaken as close as you can get to 0 …
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What's big, blue and red all over? IBM. Profit, z Systems down, cloud up

IBM today reported its second quarter financial results and the figures don't look good, with profits falling nearly 30 per cent. The venerable computing giant did perform slightly better than analysts expected, however GAAP revenues and profits are both down year-on-year. It's the 17th straight quarter of revenue declines for …
Iain Thomson, 18 Jul 2016

Boffins unveil 500TB/in2 disk. Yeah, it's made of chlorine. -196˚C, why?

Nano-tech scientists have managed to create the world’s smallest hard disk. The 500TB/inch2 disk can store a kilobyte of memory in a few tiny chlorine atoms, according to new research published in Nature Nanotechnology. Atomic memory is an attractive idea as only a few nanometres of space are needed to store a bit. A team of …
Katyanna Quach, 18 Jul 2016
Piranha fish pattern illustration

£19.5m for quantum tech

Innovate UK and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council have pledged to invest £19.5m to support quantum technology projects. The funding competition launches today and is aimed at businesses, although partnerships with academia are allowed. The registration deadline is 28 September. The government have defined …
Katyanna Quach, 18 Jul 2016

Haters gonna hate, hate, hate: Cisco to tailor SwiftStack for UCS object storage cramming

Cisco has decided to get into object storage with its UCS servers – and has done so with a SwiftStack reseller deal, avoiding object suppliers allied to its server competitors. SwiftStack provides the OpenStack Swift object storage software and has been a Cisco partner for some time. In January, Cisco released a SwiftStack …
Chris Mellor, 14 Jul 2016
Robots2, image via Shutterstock

A journey down the UK's '3D Tongue' into its mini industrial revolution

One of the few "horizon" technologies that is really making a difference right now is 3D printing. While other "big hope" concepts such as genetic engineering, nanotech and quantum physics have yet to make much of an impact, 3D has been making immediate inroads into traditional, sometimes ancient manufacturing techniques. …
Marcus Gibson, 12 Jul 2016
Layout of IBM's four superconducting quantum bit device. Using a square lattice, IBM is able to detect both types of quantum errors for the first time. This is the best configuration to add more qubits to scale to larger systems. (Credit: IBM Research)

Chrome anti-quantum crypto

Google is experimenting with encryption in Chrome that, in theory, cannot be cracked by powerful quantum computers. Today's quantum computers are science experiments, but it is believed future machines – if they ever materialize – will be able to perform the calculations needed to break today's cryptography. With that fear in …
Chris Williams, 07 Jul 2016

Physicists build simulator, hope to stand up beautiful Standard Model

Physicists have built a quantum simulator to study the Standard Model of particle physics – a theory concerning the electromagnetic, weak, and strong nuclear interactions, as well as classifying all the subatomic particles known. The simulator includes lasers and four calcium ions, according to new research published in Nature [ …
Katyanna Quach, 23 Jun 2016
Archive

New storage upstart Versity offers S3 object storage interface

Versity is an archiving software startup using multi-threaded SAM-QFS. It was founded in March 2011 by CEO Bruce Gilpin, with a VC background, and CTO Harriet Coverston. She is the tech brains of the outfit and worked at LSC (Large Storage Configurations) from 1986, which developed QFS (Quick File System). QFS grouped disk …
Chris Mellor, 21 Jun 2016
German battleship sinking at Scapa Flow

Quantum is shutting down sync'n'share biz Symform in July

Storage firm Quantum bought the Symform cloud consumer/small business file sync and share business in August 2014 – and is going to close it down on July 31. It has gone from acquisition to closure in 23 months. Why? According to a Quantum FAQ: "Quantum is discontinuing the Symform service due to its strategic business focus …
Chris Mellor, 17 Jun 2016
AI Robot viewed from the back against an arty landscape. Pic via SHuttertock

It's not us, it's you: Boffins ditch supercomputers in lust for new materials

Physicists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology have created a quantum simulator designed to model complex quantum mechanics phenomena that even the fastest supercomputer could not compute. The researchers created the simulator by trapping up to 219 beryllium ions inside a Penning trap in a bid to study …
Katyanna Quach, 10 Jun 2016

Boffins slap quantum dots on diamonds to create mutant nanomaterials

Researchers have found a new way to speed up the process of doping nanomaterials by adding quantum dots to tiny diamonds, which could advance electronics and quantum computing in the future, according to a paper published in Nature Communications. Nanomaterials have properties that are useful in electronics. Electrons travel …
Katyanna Quach, 09 Jun 2016
SMAP water scanning satellite

Boffins send encrypted quantum messages to spaaaace – and back

It may be possible to send quantum-encrypted messages through space, after physicists showed a beam of light sent to a satellite could return to Earth with its quantum properties intact, according to new research published in Physical Review Letters. Quantum cryptography relies on the properties of quantum mechanics to encode …
Katyanna Quach, 08 Jun 2016
Intel's "Knights Landing" processor

From iWarp to Knight's Landing: James Reinders leaves Intel

Intel's HPC director and evangelist James Reinders is leaving Intel after 27 years - or as he puts it, 10,001 days - accepting the firm's offer of early retirement for long-standing employees. Reinders describes how he joined Intel in 1989 to work on a VLIW (Very Long Instruction Word) processor called iWarp, designed to be …
Tim Anderson, 07 Jun 2016
HBO: Game of Thrones

The Quantum of Solace: You've still got tape. Don't forget that

Quantum’s latest results show that scale-out storage is still not growing fast enough to outweigh declining tape storage revenues – and Quantum is still a shrinking business. Let’s do the annual numbers to show the big picture first. Revenues for the full fiscal 2016 year, ended 31 March, were $475.9m, down 14 per cent year- …
Chris Mellor, 11 May 2016

IBM's quantum 'puter news proves Big Blue still doesn't get 'cloud'

In a troubling development today, IBM demonstrates it still hasn't quite grasped this cloud computing thing at all. Big Blue's boffins have built a quantum-computing processor featuring five superconducting qubits, and installed it in the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center in New York. IBM is now inviting people to request access …
Chris Williams, 04 May 2016

NIST readies 'post-quantum' crypto competition

Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to help the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) defend cryptography against the onslaught of quantum computers. It hasn't happened yet, but it's pretty widely agreed that quantum computers pose a significant risk to cryptography. All that's needed is either a …
Quantum LTO-6 Ultrium tapes

Google teams with Iron Mountain for LTO-to-cloud migration

Google and Iron Mountain are trying to hasten the never-quite-imminent death of tape as a storage medium with an LTO-to-cloud migration collaboration. LTO – linear tape open for those among you not enamoured of rusty ribbons – is a standard tape format that counts IBM, HP and Quantum among its backers. A single seventh- …
Simon Sharwood, 21 Apr 2016

Sail on SpectraLogic's BlackPearl, right up into the cloudy glory

SpectraLogic has added replication and a cloud gateway to its BlackPearl disk and tape storage combo. Where large-scale content providers need to store their relatively unstructured content (videos, etc) on a tiered disk and tape system for fast front-end disk access and low-cost long-term back-end tape, then BlackPearl …
Chris Mellor, 19 Apr 2016
European flag with sad face

EU: We're splashing out €6.7bn on a giant scientific cloud

The EU is launching a €6.7bn (£5.3bn) mega “science cloud”, intended to better exploit the continent's academic research via big data. According to a press release from the European Commission, the EU is the "largest producer of scientific data in the world, but insufficient and fragmented infrastructure means this 'big data' …
Kat Hall, 19 Apr 2016
Big cloud, image via Shutterstock

Quantum of solace: Mega cloud signing to end years of hurt?

Quantum says it has won a major cloud storage deal that could help reverse years of falling revenues. It's also announced a new chief financial officer: Fuad Ahmad will take over from Linda Breard. Breard became Quantum's chief beancounter in January 2011, and resigned in January to pursue another opportunity. Ahmad gets an …
Chris Mellor, 19 Apr 2016
Eni S.p.A Oil and Gas Supercomputer in Italy

How much faster is a quantum computer than your laptop?

HPC blog I jumped at the chance to interview supercomputing pioneer Bo Ewald and quantum computing whiz kid Murray Thom a few months ago. Although it's been in my “vault of lost content” for a while, the video serves as a good primer for quantum computing and its promise. It turns out that there are three broad categories of problem …
Justin Trudeau

Canny Canadian PM schools snarky hack on quantum computing

Video The Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has humiliated a Canadian journalist who assumed he was clueless about quantum computing. Trudeau was attending a press conference at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario to announce $50m in science funding. A reporter jokingly asked him to explain …
Iain Thomson, 15 Apr 2016
LIGO

'Cat-flap' pendulum offers 7x improvement for grav-wave detectors

A University of Western Australia (UWA) boffin who played a major part in Australia's contribution to finding gravitational waves reckons detectors can get a lot more sensitive. UWA Professor David Blair, who discussed how quantum noise can interfere with gravitational wave detection with Vulture South in 2011, has supervised …
Marc Benioff of Salesforce. Pic: Techcrunch

Shareholder rage freezes Salesforce boss Marc Benioff's package

Mark Benioff won’t be getting a pay rise this year thanks to shareholder discontent over the “excessive compensation” of Salesforce management. The CRM-as-a-Service chief exec and co-founder will take home just $1.55m in Salesforce’s fiscal year 2017, exactly the same as last year. Benioff’s potential cash bonus has been …
Gavin Clarke, 12 Apr 2016
Speed

Ames boffins mix metals to boost electron velocity

A platinum-tin “topological metal” discovered by the Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory could cut energy needed in computing applications, by moving electrons around faster. A topological quantum material – a class of stuff that includes superconductors – has a characteristic that's handy for electronics: electrons travel …
The two Wicked Lasers fired up

Turbo-charged quantum crypto? You'll need Cambridge laser boffins for that

Boffins hope to turbo-charge the speed of “unbreakable” quantum cryptographic systems with a new technique involving “seeding” one laser beam inside another. Researchers from the University of Cambridge and Toshiba Research Europe have used the technique to demonstrate that it might be possible to distribute encryption keys at …
John Leyden, 06 Apr 2016
Lady eating a sandwich checking her mobile phone

Marvell dumps founding spouses

Marvell Technology dumped its founding spouses, CEO Sehat Sutardja and president Weili Dai. Bloomberg reports an internal investigation criticized the "tone at the top," with the pair pressuring sales staff over targets. The move followed activist investor Starboard Value buying 6.7 per cent of the company. Starboard took to …

NetApp dropped the ball by letting EMC gobble Data Domain

IDC has published its quarterly confirmation that EMC’s Data Domain is crushing the competition in the purpose-built backup appliance market. The analyst outfit’s Worldwide Quarterly Purpose-Built Backup Appliance Tracker for 2015’s fourth quarter lists the top five vendors’ revenue amounts and shares for both the 2015 and …
Chris Mellor, 29 Mar 2016
The quantum Fredkin gate

Three-bit quantum gate a step closer to universal quantum computer

Quantum research boffins in Australia have demonstrated one of computing's universal gates, the Fredkin gate, operating with qubits instead of bits. The Fredkin gate – described here at Wikipedia – is a reversible three-bit gate that can be used to construct AND, OR, XOR and NOT functions. If the first of the three bits is a 1 …
LTO-2 tape cartridge

Riddle me this: What grows as it shrinks? Answer: LTO tape

The LTO (linear tape-open) organization has released a tape shipment report showing capacity shipped grew almost 18 per cent from 2014 to 2015, while unit shipments have been declining since 2008. The LTO organization basically looks after the LTO format and represents the interests of the LTO Program Technology Provider …
Chris Mellor, 24 Mar 2016
Sunset

Ex-archiver striver Crossroads: Time to sell all the products

Crossroads Systems has sold its StrongBox archiving products business to StrongBox Data Solutions, Inc. of Canada for just $1.85m in cash. That's just $50,000 more than last quarter's $1.8m revenues, from which Crossroads recorded a $538,000 loss. In the prior three quarters of its fiscal 2015 year, losses had exceeded …
Chris Mellor, 23 Mar 2016

Silicon photonics boosted with UK fabrication research

Silicon photonics is one of the industry's hottest research fields, because it holds out the promise of accelerating on-chip communications without the extra heat that faster copper-based comms generate. One of the big challenges is fabrication, and that's the subject of research announced by University College London, Cardiff …
NIST's silicon nitride beam

NIST set to shake up temperature with quantum thermometer

A moment with Google will reveal all kinds of cranks offering “free” energy from quantum “zero-point” phenomena, but it's a real thing with real effects. At the tiniest scales, quanta vibrate, even at their lowest energy. If all motion ceased, an observer would be able to breach uncertainty theory. Now, National Institute for …
Violin_Tailpiece_and_bridge

Four crucial deals to pluck Violin Memory away from the trash can

Analysis During the Violin Memory quarterly results earnings call on Thursday, CEO Kevin DeNuccio talked about his company's strategic review with investment banker Jefferies LLC. The review "included both inbound and outbound inquiries of over 40 companies" that might benefit from using or selling "the technology and value proposition …
Chris Mellor, 11 Mar 2016
London bus photo, by Nando Machado Shutterstock

Alice, Bob and Verity, too. Yeah, everybody's got a story, pal

Stob Once there were a million A&B stories on the Naked Web. Now there are a million-and-one. Alice and Bob are two commonly used placeholder names. They are used for archetypal characters in fields such as cryptography, game theory and physics – Wikipedia I had caught the H[redacted] bus heading east (via Turd Park, Central …
Verity Stob, 07 Mar 2016

Speaking in Tech: Down rounds, fleeing techies - how to spot a startup death spiral

Podcast speaking_in_tech Greg Knieriemen podcast enterprise Want to hear a funny wrap-up of everything important that happened in the tech world this week? Enterprise storage and consumer kit gurus Greg Knieriemen, Ed Saipetch and Sarah Vela are joined by a few of their favourite guests to celebrate four years and 200 episodes as …
Team Register, 02 Mar 2016

BOFH: This laptop has ceased to be. And it's pub o'clock soon

Episode 3 You know what it's like. The Boss asks you some technical question, you give him a non-technical answer and he suddenly thinks you're lying to him – or worse – that you don't know what you're talking about. He needs it explained to him in a manner that sounds technical, but isn't too technical for him to stack overflow. ON A …
Simon Travaglia, 26 Feb 2016
hacker

Defence white paper lands: Cyber-threat is huge, spend is small

The Australian government has revealed its Defence White Paper and it seems most of the AU$25 billion discussed in the context of all-the-cybers is going to be spent on drones. The electronic warfare and electronic security spend is much more modest, both in systems and in personnel. In total, the white paper devotes nine per …

Public enemies: Azure, Amazon, Google, Oracle, OpenStack, SoftLayer will murder private IT

Analysis On-premises IT is facing decimation by six public cloud enemies: Amazon, Azure, Google, OpenStack, Oracle and SoftLayer, who are on course to have the majority of customers' IT spend by 2018. An Internet retailer, started up as an online book store, and a website search facility have kickstarted an IT phenomenon which could …
Chris Mellor, 16 Feb 2016

EMC's hardware 'quantum leap' is more of a brisk catchup stroll

EMC's VCE converged systems unit is heading into hyperconverged country with new VxRail appliances that look and behave an awful lot like existing products from upstart rivals, but are promised to be simpler and cheaper. The Register foreshadowed the launch of VxRail. Forgive us a little smugness because we mostly got it right …
Simon Sharwood, 16 Feb 2016
Parliament House Canberra by Flickr user OzMark17 used under CC Share and Share alike licence

CSIRO says it hasn't sacked the LIGO mirror-makers

In an example of how heated the debate over the much-reduced budget at Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) has become, an argument has broken out over whether the division that helped craft mirrors for the groundbreaking LIGO experiment still exists. Mirrors and their calibration …
Supreme Court Building

They've reached it: Crossroads' stock price crashes to just $0.25

Crossroads Systems’s share price has collapsed to $0.25. It was $3.65 in March 2015, following full fiscal 2015 results showing a fifth loss-making year of declining revenues. Why is it still afloat? In its final quarter of financial year 2015, ended Oct 31, the archival software systems shipper saw revenues of a derisory $1. …
Chris Mellor, 03 Feb 2016
Internet Meme: text says Integrate all the Things

'VxRail' looks like EMC's next-gen hyper-converged appliance

EMC and VMware are making more noise about a hyper-converged launch this month. The Register's virtualisation desk is willing to go out on a limb and say that among the announcements will be a hardware product called VxRail. Here's our logic. EMC used its annual results call to reveal it has new hyper-converged kit on the way …
Simon Sharwood, 01 Feb 2016