Articles about Quantum

An Olympic-sized swimming pool

Tiery-eyed NetApp previews on-prem storage and cloud tie-up

NetApp has previewed a FabricPool technology which combines on-premises and AWS cloud storage into a single repository. This is part of NetApp's overall Data fabric strategy of converging and integrating on-premises storage with the public cloud. Joe Caradonna, senior technical director at NetApp, presented Fabric Pool at …
Chris Mellor, 30 Sep 2016
D-Wave chip

D-Wave doubles qubit count

Quantum computer company D-Wave systems has announced a new processor using 2000 qubits, double its previous qubit count. The company says it's also added new features to the machine so that it can: Tune the rate of annealing of individual qubits to enhance application performance; Sample the state of the quantum computer …
Simon Sharwood, 30 Sep 2016
drawing of live cat and cat skeleton

Quantum comms succeed over metro-scale fibre networks

Two groups both reported successfully teleporting state information across metro-scale fibre networks. A Chinese team is claiming a teleportation over a 30 km fibre in Haifei (the entanglement travelled nearly 16 km), while the University of Calgary used that city's fibre network to carry entanglement 6.2 km (preprint here). …
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The Rector reckoning – DataDirect loses CMO

HPC and enterprise high-performance storage company DataDirect Networks has lost Molly Rector, its chief marketing officer, who has moved to take up a VP marketing role at Quantum. Robert Triendl has been promoted to DataDirect's SVP global sales, marketing and field services from a position as SVP for HPC strategy. He tells …
Chris Mellor, 19 Sep 2016
MoD tech creche launch panel. Features Def Sec Michael Fallon and Gen Sir Gordon Messenger RM, Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff

It's here! Defence Secretary launches £800m MoD tech creche

Defence secretary Michael Fallon confirmed the launch of the Ministry of Defence's £800m innovation fund this morning at a speech in a Spitalfields back alley. Announced back in July, the tech creche will concentrate on getting the UK's technology industries to start putting their inventions and ideas forward to “Defence”, …
Gareth Corfield, 16 Sep 2016
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Chinese space lab lifts today

China plans to launch its Tiangong-2 space lab today, at 14:00 UTC. The lab is 10.4 meters in length and 3.35 meters in maximum diameter. Two astronauts at a time can use the lab, for up to 30 days, before returning to terra firma. China has plans for robotic resupply missions using its Tianzhou-1 craft. The lab has a …
Simon Sharwood, 15 Sep 2016

Microsoft thinks time crystals may be viable after all

Microsoft researchers have teamed up with physicists from the University of California, Santa Barbara, to show how time crystals might be possible. First proposed by Nobel-prize winning theoretical physicist Frank Wilczek, time crystals are hypothetical systems that spontaneously break time-translational symmetry (TTS) – a …
Katyanna Quach, 12 Sep 2016
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Little boxes made of ticky-tacky: What Dell's record-busting $67bn EMC deal means

Dell’s acquisition of EMC is large by several measures: a $67bn purchase price – the most ever paid in tech. The claimed joint revenue for Dell and EMC is $74bn and the current joint workforce is 140,000 – with 40,000 being sales staff. Even the statements as to “why” Dell is buying EMC are big – yuuuge - with Michael Dell at …
Gavin Clarke, 08 Sep 2016
Artist's view of a binary black hole. Pic credit: NASA, ESA and G Bacon (STScI)

Oz universities plan big iron to look for gravitational waves

A new supercomputer is one of the goodies that Australia's Swinburne University will get in a newly-launched gravitational wave research project. The university's professor Matthew Bailes is leading an AU$31.3 million initiative called OzGRav, and is drawing together local researchers who already have experience in …
Star Trek toys photo by Willrow Hood via Shutterstock

Forget Khan and Klingons, Star Trek's greatest trick was simply surviving

Star Trek @ 50 Thirteen films, TV spin-offs, millions of loyal fans and the ultimate of accolades for any work of science fiction – spoofs. Confirmation indeed of Star Trek's status as a cultural force. Fifty years ago this week, the genesis of that legacy played to unsuspecting and uninitiated US viewers. Star Trek the original TV series …
Gavin Clarke, 07 Sep 2016
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Ditch tape and fly into the public cloud with us, beams bullish Actifio

Comment Actifio can store its virtualised copy data in the public cloud, calling its facility OnVault and saying it replaces tape and dedplicated disk data graveyards. Its press release thunders away, saying that the term "vault" comes from the practice of locking away tape media literally in a physical vault for compliance …
Chris Mellor, 02 Sep 2016
NIST's SET Pump electron-counter

Pump-priming the new ampere: NIST works to count electrons in silicon

The ampere, a perpetual embarrassment to the world of scientific standardisation, is due to get a measurable physical standard in 2018, and America's National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) hopes to help provide its definition. Most SI base units have a clear physical definition – the metre is defined by the …
NSA

Snowden files confirm Shadow Brokers spilled NSA's Equation Group spy tools over the web

Documents from the Edward Snowden archive prove that the malware and exploits dumped on the public internet on Monday originated from the NSA. Among the files leaked by whistleblower Snowden in 2013 is a draft NSA manual on how to redirect people's web browsers using a man-in-the-middle tool called SECONDDATE. This piece of …
Iain Thomson, 19 Aug 2016
Gartner's 2016 emerging tech hype cycle

Drones, blockchain still hype

Gartner has revealed its 2016 hype cycle for emerging technologies. For those of you unfamiliar with the document, Gartner rates technologies as emerging after an “innovation trigger” before ascending to a “peak of inflated expectations”. From there, technologies often fail to deliver on their promise and tumble into a “trough …
Simon Sharwood, 17 Aug 2016

Lab-grown black hole proves Stephen Hawking's radiation claims – physicist

A physicist claims to have created a sonic black hole to observe Hawking radiation and its quantum weirdness, all within the safe confines of his laboratory. The gravitational pull of a black hole was once assumed to be so strong that no object or light could escape once it was dragged beyond the event horizon, making it …
Katyanna Quach, 16 Aug 2016
Beam of light

China launches quantum satellite to test spooky action at a distance

China has launched a satellite dubbed “Micius” that bears the Quantum Experiments at Space Scale (QUESS) instrument it will use to test quantum communications between Earth and space. QUESS' key payload is entangled photons. A quick primer: if you fire a photon at certain crystals it will split into two photons. Both of those …
Simon Sharwood, 16 Aug 2016

NIST wants answers on infosec - your answers

Sometimes, “don't read the comments” just isn't an option – like when you're United States' National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and you're soliciting input for the US government's Commission on Enhancing National Cybersecurity (CENC). The CENC, which was announced back in April, has asked NIST to provide …
Swedish eggs and meat dish - pyttipanna

Intel overhyping flash-killer XPoint? Shocked, we're totally shocked

+Comment XPoint will substantially undershoot the 1,000-times-faster and 1,000-times-longer-lived-than-flash claims made by Intel when it was first announced – with just a 10-times speed boost and 2.5-times longer endurance in reality. This became clear when Micron presented details of its QuantX-branded XPoint memory technology at the …
Chris Mellor, 12 Aug 2016
drawing of live cat and cat skeleton

MIT's chip fires frikkin' laser at qubits

MIT boffins reckon they've cracked one of the more difficult challenges of practical quantum computing – the miniaturisation of components. In a paper at Nature, the Karan Mehta, Colin Bruzewicz, Robert McConnell, Rajeev Ram, Jeremy Sage and John Chiaverini say they've printed an ion trap and optical waveguide together in a …
Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim

Break out the Elder Scrolls: Skyrmion characters seek storage possibilities

Durham University quantum physicists have been funded to run a Skyrmion Project involving other British universities, which, among other aims, could mean less electricity was needed to power the world. Skyrmions, predicted by physicist Tony Skyrme in 1962, are nanoscale swirling, whirlpool-like patterns in a magnetic field. …
Chris Mellor, 05 Aug 2016

Pass the hash for peace, love and security in the quantum computing age

Digital signatures, one of the fundamental parts of cryptography, may one day be threatened by quantum computers – so crypto-boffins are busy devising schemes that can survive a post-quantum world. In a paper that's just landed at the International Association for Cryptologic Research, a group of UK and Belgian researchers are …
Twisted light image - University of Rochester

Boffins shrink light-twister to silicon scale, multiply bandwidth 10x

We've known for some time that the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light (colloquially known as “twisted light”) can be modulated to carry information, but until now, it's only been demonstrated on large-scale laboratory lasers. That's changed with work from the State University of New York at Buffalo and the Polytechnic …

Quantum leap: A good quarter for disk backup gear, and yeah tape's OK

Quantum’s first fiscal 2017 quarter – the three months to June 30, 2016 – showed revenue growth as the tape market stabilized and big deals came good. Revenues of $116.3m were five per cent higher than last year’s $110.9m. There was a net loss of $3.8m, better than the $10.8m loss recorded a year ago and the unfortunate $52.4m …
Chris Mellor, 29 Jul 2016

QLC flash is tricky stuff to make and use, so here's a primer

QLC flash primer Quad-level cell (QLC) flash stores 4 bits per NAND cell and is very tricky stuff to use, far trickier than TLC (3 bits/cell) which is harder to user than 2 bits/cell MLC which, you guessed it, is more difficult to use than 1bit/cell SLC. Why is QLC the hardest of all to use? It is the slowest to read and write …
Chris Mellor, 28 Jul 2016

All you need for quantum computing at room temperature is some mothballs

Much of the current research on the development of a quantum computer involves work at very low temperatures. The challenge to make them more practical for everyday use is to make them work at room temperature. The breakthrough here came from the use of some everyday materials, with details published today in Nature …

Google tests its own quantum computer – both qubits of it

A couple of years ago, a quantum physicist suggested to Vulture South that one of the best uses for quantum computers might be to model reality. Now, Google reckons its boffins have done just that. Science wants to model quantum systems because they lie at the heart of reality. For example, chemistry – where Google has chosen …
drawing of live cat and cat skeleton

Schrödinger's cat explained with neutrinos

Physicists have found that neutrinos keep their quantum weirdness over the longest distance that quantum mechanics has been tested to date. Superposition is a fundamental theory in quantum mechanics. The idea that particles can exist simultaneously in many different states was famously compared to a thought experiment devised …
Katyanna Quach, 20 Jul 2016
Icefield

Spectra Logic preserves black pearls in Amazon's deep freeze

Spectra Logic has added direct archive to Amazon's S3-accessed public cloud from its BlackPearl object storage gateway. Spectra is a tape storage company that has been and is evolving into a more general nearline and archive storage supplier encompassing on-premises object storage, tape and nearline disk media, and Amazon's …
Chris Mellor, 20 Jul 2016
A bottle of burned naphtalene

Oz boffins cook quantum computing out of mothballs

A Sydney University researcher has burned naphthalene to create a material that can hold quantum qubit information at room temperatures. While the world has both quantum storage and quantum gates, albeit at small scales, even performing a simple Boolean AND operation on qubits is best undertaken as close as you can get to 0 …
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What's big, blue and red all over? IBM. Profit, z Systems down, cloud up

IBM today reported its second quarter financial results and the figures don't look good, with profits falling nearly 30 per cent. The venerable computing giant did perform slightly better than analysts expected, however GAAP revenues and profits are both down year-on-year. It's the 17th straight quarter of revenue declines for …
Iain Thomson, 18 Jul 2016

Boffins unveil 500TB/in2 disk. Yeah, it's made of chlorine. -196˚C, why?

Nano-tech scientists have managed to create the world’s smallest hard disk. The 500TB/inch2 disk can store a kilobyte of memory in a few tiny chlorine atoms, according to new research published in Nature Nanotechnology. Atomic memory is an attractive idea as only a few nanometres of space are needed to store a bit. A team of …
Katyanna Quach, 18 Jul 2016
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£19.5m for quantum tech

Innovate UK and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council have pledged to invest £19.5m to support quantum technology projects. The funding competition launches today and is aimed at businesses, although partnerships with academia are allowed. The registration deadline is 28 September. The government have defined …
Katyanna Quach, 18 Jul 2016

Haters gonna hate, hate, hate: Cisco to tailor SwiftStack for UCS object storage cramming

Cisco has decided to get into object storage with its UCS servers – and has done so with a SwiftStack reseller deal, avoiding object suppliers allied to its server competitors. SwiftStack provides the OpenStack Swift object storage software and has been a Cisco partner for some time. In January, Cisco released a SwiftStack …
Chris Mellor, 14 Jul 2016
Robots2, image via Shutterstock

A journey down the UK's '3D Tongue' into its mini industrial revolution

One of the few "horizon" technologies that is really making a difference right now is 3D printing. While other "big hope" concepts such as genetic engineering, nanotech and quantum physics have yet to make much of an impact, 3D has been making immediate inroads into traditional, sometimes ancient manufacturing techniques. …
Marcus Gibson, 12 Jul 2016
Layout of IBM's four superconducting quantum bit device. Using a square lattice, IBM is able to detect both types of quantum errors for the first time. This is the best configuration to add more qubits to scale to larger systems. (Credit: IBM Research)

Chrome anti-quantum crypto

Google is experimenting with encryption in Chrome that, in theory, cannot be cracked by powerful quantum computers. Today's quantum computers are science experiments, but it is believed future machines – if they ever materialize – will be able to perform the calculations needed to break today's cryptography. With that fear in …
Chris Williams, 07 Jul 2016

Physicists build simulator, hope to stand up beautiful Standard Model

Physicists have built a quantum simulator to study the Standard Model of particle physics – a theory concerning the electromagnetic, weak, and strong nuclear interactions, as well as classifying all the subatomic particles known. The simulator includes lasers and four calcium ions, according to new research published in Nature [ …
Katyanna Quach, 23 Jun 2016
Archive

New storage upstart Versity offers S3 object storage interface

Versity is an archiving software startup using multi-threaded SAM-QFS. It was founded in March 2011 by CEO Bruce Gilpin, with a VC background, and CTO Harriet Coverston. She is the tech brains of the outfit and worked at LSC (Large Storage Configurations) from 1986, which developed QFS (Quick File System). QFS grouped disk …
Chris Mellor, 21 Jun 2016
German battleship sinking at Scapa Flow

Quantum is shutting down sync'n'share biz Symform in July

Storage firm Quantum bought the Symform cloud consumer/small business file sync and share business in August 2014 – and is going to close it down on July 31. It has gone from acquisition to closure in 23 months. Why? According to a Quantum FAQ: "Quantum is discontinuing the Symform service due to its strategic business focus …
Chris Mellor, 17 Jun 2016
AI Robot viewed from the back against an arty landscape. Pic via SHuttertock

It's not us, it's you: Boffins ditch supercomputers in lust for new materials

Physicists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology have created a quantum simulator designed to model complex quantum mechanics phenomena that even the fastest supercomputer could not compute. The researchers created the simulator by trapping up to 219 beryllium ions inside a Penning trap in a bid to study …
Katyanna Quach, 10 Jun 2016

Boffins slap quantum dots on diamonds to create mutant nanomaterials

Researchers have found a new way to speed up the process of doping nanomaterials by adding quantum dots to tiny diamonds, which could advance electronics and quantum computing in the future, according to a paper published in Nature Communications. Nanomaterials have properties that are useful in electronics. Electrons travel …
Katyanna Quach, 09 Jun 2016
SMAP water scanning satellite

Boffins send encrypted quantum messages to spaaaace – and back

It may be possible to send quantum-encrypted messages through space, after physicists showed a beam of light sent to a satellite could return to Earth with its quantum properties intact, according to new research published in Physical Review Letters. Quantum cryptography relies on the properties of quantum mechanics to encode …
Katyanna Quach, 08 Jun 2016
Intel's "Knights Landing" processor

From iWarp to Knight's Landing: James Reinders leaves Intel

Intel's HPC director and evangelist James Reinders is leaving Intel after 27 years - or as he puts it, 10,001 days - accepting the firm's offer of early retirement for long-standing employees. Reinders describes how he joined Intel in 1989 to work on a VLIW (Very Long Instruction Word) processor called iWarp, designed to be …
Tim Anderson, 07 Jun 2016
HBO: Game of Thrones

The Quantum of Solace: You've still got tape. Don't forget that

Quantum’s latest results show that scale-out storage is still not growing fast enough to outweigh declining tape storage revenues – and Quantum is still a shrinking business. Let’s do the annual numbers to show the big picture first. Revenues for the full fiscal 2016 year, ended 31 March, were $475.9m, down 14 per cent year- …
Chris Mellor, 11 May 2016

IBM's quantum 'puter news proves Big Blue still doesn't get 'cloud'

In a troubling development today, IBM demonstrates it still hasn't quite grasped this cloud computing thing at all. Big Blue's boffins have built a quantum-computing processor featuring five superconducting qubits, and installed it in the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center in New York. IBM is now inviting people to request access …
Chris Williams, 04 May 2016

NIST readies 'post-quantum' crypto competition

Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to help the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) defend cryptography against the onslaught of quantum computers. It hasn't happened yet, but it's pretty widely agreed that quantum computers pose a significant risk to cryptography. All that's needed is either a …
Quantum LTO-6 Ultrium tapes

Google teams with Iron Mountain for LTO-to-cloud migration

Google and Iron Mountain are trying to hasten the never-quite-imminent death of tape as a storage medium with an LTO-to-cloud migration collaboration. LTO – linear tape open for those among you not enamoured of rusty ribbons – is a standard tape format that counts IBM, HP and Quantum among its backers. A single seventh- …
Simon Sharwood, 21 Apr 2016

Sail on SpectraLogic's BlackPearl, right up into the cloudy glory

SpectraLogic has added replication and a cloud gateway to its BlackPearl disk and tape storage combo. Where large-scale content providers need to store their relatively unstructured content (videos, etc) on a tiered disk and tape system for fast front-end disk access and low-cost long-term back-end tape, then BlackPearl …
Chris Mellor, 19 Apr 2016
European flag with sad face

EU: We're splashing out €6.7bn on a giant scientific cloud

The EU is launching a €6.7bn (£5.3bn) mega “science cloud”, intended to better exploit the continent's academic research via big data. According to a press release from the European Commission, the EU is the "largest producer of scientific data in the world, but insufficient and fragmented infrastructure means this 'big data' …
Kat Hall, 19 Apr 2016
Big cloud, image via Shutterstock

Quantum of solace: Mega cloud signing to end years of hurt?

Quantum says it has won a major cloud storage deal that could help reverse years of falling revenues. It's also announced a new chief financial officer: Fuad Ahmad will take over from Linda Breard. Breard became Quantum's chief beancounter in January 2011, and resigned in January to pursue another opportunity. Ahmad gets an …
Chris Mellor, 19 Apr 2016
Eni S.p.A Oil and Gas Supercomputer in Italy

How much faster is a quantum computer than your laptop?

HPC blog I jumped at the chance to interview supercomputing pioneer Bo Ewald and quantum computing whiz kid Murray Thom a few months ago. Although it's been in my “vault of lost content” for a while, the video serves as a good primer for quantum computing and its promise. It turns out that there are three broad categories of problem …