Articles about Pgp

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Florida U boffins think they've defeated all ransomware

Researchers from the University of Florida and Villanova University reckon ransomware can be stopped by watching what it's doing to the target's files. Taking a “save what you can” approach, the authors of this PDF reckon in their tests they were able to lower the boom on ransomware when it had encrypted just 0.2 per cent of …

'MongoDB ate my containers!'

Line Break Welcome back to The Register's weekly software bug parade, Line Break: Season Two. After a hiatus, and a vacation here or there, Line Break has been recommissioned. You can catch up on previous episodes, here. The idea is simple: if you spot buggy code in the wild that's driven you bonkers or to hysterics, drop us a line with …
Chris Williams, 08 Jun 2016
Jon Callas

Apple hires crypto-wizard Jon Callas to beef up security

Apple has added a security star to its firmament with the hire of Jon Callas to its security team. Callas, who you may remember from cofounding such firms as PGP (Pretty Good Privacy) and Silent Circle, has already been an Apple employee twice before. He worked at Apple in the 1990s and rejoined for a couple of years from 2009 …
Iain Thomson, 24 May 2016

How to evade the NSA: OpSec guide for journalists also used by terrorists

Privacy guides meant for journalists are being re-purposed by terrorist groups, Trend Micro researchers say. The guides are designed to help hacks avoid surveillance by nation-states and well-resourced adversaries focusing on encryption, operational security, recommended and untrusted platforms. It is one finding of dozens …
Darren Pauli, 04 May 2016
Man shouting the news from a rolled up newspaper

Locky locks down

Ransomware scum have deployed PGP to block researchers. Authors of the hugely prolific and as-yet unbroken Locky ransomware are using Pretty Good Privacy encryption to stop white hats peering into the communications traffic between victims and fleecers. It means statistics on the number of infections will be harder to clean …
Team Register, 04 May 2016

I am Craig Wright, inventor of Craig Wright

"If you are going through hell, keep going." – Albert Einstein, 1991. I remember reading that quote on a motivational poster somewhere or other many years ago. I have carried it with me uncomfortably ever since. There's no easy way to fold a poster into your pocket. I think I am now finally at peace with what old Bertie meant …
Craig Wright, 03 May 2016

Microsoft's Windows 10 nagware storms live TV weather forecast

Microsoft's relentless Windows 10 nagware has interrupted a live TV weather forecast, urging meteorologist Metinka Slater to upgrade. The operating system suddenly popped up a box on screen insisting the station's computer be upgraded to the latest version – while Slater was on air describing thunderstorms rolling through Iowa …
Chris Williams, 28 Apr 2016

Dutch PGP-encrypted comms network ‘abused by crooks’ is busted

Dutch firm Ennetcom has pulled its systems offline following a bust by police and accusations that its encryption technology was being abused as a communications network by drug dealers. Police have seized servers in the Netherlands, and Canada is dismantling what local reports describe as a PGP-based comms network. The …
John Leyden, 21 Apr 2016
Uncle Sam, photo via Shutterstock

How the FBI will lose its iPhone fight, thanks to 'West Coast Law'

Analysis Apple versus the FBI has generated much discussion and conjecture lately. The vast majority of it has centered on the rights and the wrongs, about the loss of privacy, and of the precedent that breaking one iPhone would create. Many are hanging on the blow-by-blow developments for an outcome, to see which side trumps: Apple …

Wanted! A browser to replace Xombrero

Readers' corner Not a mainstream request this one perhaps, but over at El Reg Forums, 1980s coder is seeking some advice. Guys, what do you reckon? I'm looking for an alternative to the Xombrero web browser, now that it seems to be virtually unmaintained, and becoming increasingly out of date. I liked it because it worked well without a …
Drew Cullen, 02 Feb 2016
Nick Weaver

Cops hate encryption but the NSA loves it when you use PGP

Usenix Enigma Although the cops and Feds wont stop banging on and on about encryption – the spies have a different take on the use of crypto. To be brutally blunt, they love it. Why? Because using detectable encryption technology like PGP, Tor, VPNs and so on, lights you up on the intelligence agencies' dashboards. Agents and analysts don't …
Iain Thomson, 27 Jan 2016
Dutch police

BlackBerry baffled by Dutch cops' phone encryption cracked brag

Claims by the Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI) that it has successfully decrypted emails stored on BlackBerry smartphones have caused bafflement at the Canadian firm. Documents seen by Dutch blog Crime News show the NFI claiming to have decrypted 275 out of 325 emails encrypted with PGP from a handset in their possession. …
Iain Thomson, 13 Jan 2016
Bitcoin

Bitcoin inventor Satoshi 'outed' as Aussie, then raided by cops – but NOT over BTC

The home of a bloke fingered by WiReD and tech blog Gizmodo as a possible inventor of Bitcoin has been raided by the Australian Federal Police – just hours after their articles were published. The Register was happy to watch the house publication of deluded entrepreneurs and Giz slug it out over whose evidence is best and who …

ProtonMail still under attack by DDoS bombardment

Secure webmail outfit ProtonMail is still fighting against a sustained DDoS attack that has left its service largely unavailable since Tuesday. In a statement posted to a hastily erected blog site, ProtonMail said the powerful attack by unknown parties has also inflicted collateral damage on third-party organisations. The …
John Leyden, 05 Nov 2015

UK cyber-spy law takes Snowden's revelations of mass surveillance – and sets them in stone

IPB The encryption bothering parts of the UK's Investigatory Powers Bill have left IT security experts flabbergasted. Introducing the draft internet surveillance law in the House of Commons on Wednesday, Home Secretary Theresa May presented it as consolidating and updating existing investigatory powers. She spun it as a break from …
John Leyden, 05 Nov 2015
Broken CD with wrench

E-mail crypto is as usable as it ever was, say boffins

The main reason the world is able to read and enjoy the contents of Hillary Clinton's emails is that crypto tools aren't any better than back when Phil Zimmerman created PGP, the crypto system even he can't use. That's the conclusion of this study into e-mail crypto usability, a follow-up to a study which reached the same …

Cryptome grudgingly admits to leak of users' ancient IP addresses

Venerable leak site Cryptome.org has 'fessed up to a data leak that saw some users' IP addresses reach the Internet. After initially dismissing data posted by security researcher Michael Best as a mockup, Cryptome founder John Young conceded that a USB key sent to some of the site's supporters included site statistics data …
Rafe Laguna, CEO of open source enterprise software company Open Xchange, addresses the audience. Pic by Andrew Orlowski

Google uses humans as Matrix-style ‘data batteries’ – Open Xchange CEO

OX Summit 2015 If any Americans are in doubt about what European technology business thinks of Silicon Valley’s data-slurping giants, it wouldn’t take them long to find out from a gathering in Berlin of European companies who look after personal data. The audience applauded wildly (and it was the only applause of a sober keynote) when Rafael …
Andrew Orlowski, 09 Oct 2015
NSA parody T-shirt

PGP Zimmermann: 'You want privacy? Well privacy costs MONEY'

IP EXPO 2015 Delivering a keynote in London today, the famous inventor of PGP complained that consumers want privacy for free, forcing his company Silent Circle to focus on selling secure telephony to enterprises - while he would like to see it more widely employed. Silent Circle, the cryptographic communications firm at which Zimmermann …
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Rights groups: Darn you Facebook with your 'government names'

The ZuckerBorg's continued refusal to assimilate anyone who won't provide their "real" name to the site has provoked an angry letter from 75 human rights, digital rights, LGBTQ and women's rights advocates. Facebook has always claimed its "real name" policy protects users from harassment, as without the right to anonymity …
hot_librarian_648

Facebook's security now sexier, with killer curves

Facebook has boosted its security chops with support for better bang-for-buck email encryption. Menlo Park now supports OpenPGP's standard elliptic curve cryptography public keys meaning security and privacy pundits can post their public keys which will then be used to encrypt email notifications. It supports NIST curves P- …
Darren Pauli, 24 Sep 2015

Cryptome founder revokes PGP keys after weird 'compromise'

Updated The creator of digital library and whistle-blowing site Cryptome.org, John Young, has revoked a host of his PGP key pairs after learning they were compromised. In a site statement on Tuesday, Young claimed to have learned "that all PGP public keys of John Young and Cryptome have been compromised." He added "the keys have been …

IoT baby monitors STILL revealing live streams of sleeping kids

Internet-connected baby monitors are riddled with security flaws that could broadcast live footage of your sleeping children to the world and his dog, according to new research. Mark Stanislav, a security researcher at Rapid7, discovered numerous security weaknesses and design flaws after evaluating nine different devices from …
John Leyden, 03 Sep 2015
ISIS fighters

Turkey cites crypto software find in terror charges against TV crew

Possession of an encryption program used by jihadists is being cited of evidence against two Vice News journalists and a local fixer / translator arrested in Turkey, who now face terror-related charges. British journalist Jake Hanrahan, cameraman Philip Pendlebury and their local assistant were picked up last week in …
John Leyden, 02 Sep 2015
hacker

Hacking Team: We’ll be back in the spyware biz before you know it

Hacked snoopware maker Hacking Team says it will continue its operations as soon as possible – and claims the huge source-code leak it suffered didn’t get all of the company's crown jewels. "What happened earlier this summer in the attack on our company was a reckless and vicious crime," said CEO David Vincenzetti in the …
Iain Thomson, 13 Jul 2015
Stacks of bitcoin CC2.0 attribution by FD Comite https://www.flickr.com/photos/fdecomite/

Slippery Silk Road spook will plead guilty to duping dealers

A US Secret Service information security bod is going to enter a guilty plea to pilfering US$820,000 in Bitcoins from scuttled drug souk the Silk Road. Shaun W. Bridges admitted to harvesting the anonymous currency before cashing out at the then Mx Gox Bitcoin exchange and going into hiding. “Mr. Bridges has regretted his …
Darren Pauli, 23 Jun 2015
Edward Snowden

'Snowden risked lives' fearfest story prompts sceptical sneers

Analysis A row has broken out over claims that Russian and Chinese have reportedly decrypted files of NSA leaker Edward Snowden, identifying British and US secret agents in the process. The Sunday Times used unnamed UK government and intel agency officials1 to support a story that MI6 has withdrawn agents from overseas operations in …
John Leyden, 15 Jun 2015

Facebook flings PGP-encrypted email at world+dog. Don't lose your private key

Hands-on Facebook can now powerfully encrypt notification emails sent to its users with PGP – keeping potentially sensitive messages out of the hands of hackers and other snoopers. The social network has also added a spot for people to share their public PGP keys via the HTTPS-protected website. "We are gradually rolling out an …
Iain Thomson, 01 Jun 2015

Death-to-passwords FIDO Alliance finds a friend at DOCOMO

Japanese users will be able to log in and make online purchases using iris recognition biometrics after telco giant DOCOMO begins shipping Fujitsu ARROWS phones. The telco's 65 million users will be able to use the biometric verification on the ARROWS F-04G said to be the world's first iris snapper. Fingerprint biometric login …
Darren Pauli, 27 May 2015
container_ship_hamburg_shutterstock_648

US plans to apply export controls to 0-days put out for comment

US proposals for export controls for zero-day vulnerabilities and malware have finally been pushed forward, re-opening the fault lines of a long-running argument among security experts in the process. The proposals (pdf) from the US Department of Commerce would introduce the Wassenaar Arrangement (WA) – an international …
John Leyden, 20 May 2015

Hacker data dumps scrape to make huge grey marketing database

Former password collector Steve Thomas plans to tear up the contact broker market by offering a database of 30 million names for free, all built on data sourced by scraping the web. The former PwnedList founder, and now SalesMaple CEO, says the database will soon to balloon to almost 100 million records. Thomas said it will …
Darren Pauli, 20 May 2015
The US White House. Pic: Roman Boed

Please no non-consensual BACKDOOR SNIFFING, Mr Obama

Google, Apple and 140 other technology companies will write to US President Obama today (19 May) to argue against plans which could see the security of electronic communications deliberately and compulsorily compromised for the sake of government surveillance access. The letter is intended to display the depth of support for …
Fluffy grey ragdoll cat relaxes next to laptop.

PANIC! RSA keys are compromised!

Just as quickly as a panic emerged about vulnerable 4096-bit RSA keys, it's been defused. The discussion started with this brief post at Loper-OS, with the headline claim that: “I am pleased to announce that we have now broken a 4096-bit RSA key, as well as its factor-sharing counterpart (yet to be determined, but won’t wait for …
America

WHY can't Silicon Valley create breakable non-breakable encryption, cry US politicians

Analysis At last week's RSA security conference, the halls were full of government speakers telling the tech community that it must do the impossible: invent a form of encryption that's strong, but also easy for law enforcement to crack. Ever since Apple and Google enabled full-device encryption by default on their mobile operating …
Iain Thomson, 28 Apr 2015

ID yourself or get NOTHING (except Framework), snarls Metasploit

Metasploit Pro and Community users outside North America now need to prove who they are, thanks to changes introduced this week and a tightening of encryption export rules. The open source Metasploit Framework (a computer security project) is not affected by the new rules. "[This] is yet another reminder that governments have …
John Leyden, 21 Apr 2015

Feds cuffed for allegedly PILFERING Silk Road drug souk's Bitcoins

The US Department of Justice has accused two federal agents of stealing more than a million dollars in Bitcoins during the Silk Road investigation. Former Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agent Carl Force and former Secret Service agent Shaun Bridges have been charged with theft of government property; wire fraud; money …
Shaun Nichols, 30 Mar 2015
Suitcase bulging with cash

Open-Xchange builds anti Oracle stack after server M&A splurge

Open-Xchange, a maker of web apps that some of the biggest telcos and hosts rebrand as their own, has bought up open-source mailserver firm Dovecot and DNS server outfit PowerDNS. There are lots of possible reasons for this burst of activity, the most obvious being Open-Xchange's desire to offer its service provider customers a …
David Meyer, 24 Mar 2015
eyeofSauron

Want to hide your metadata? You probably can't

With every development in Australia's data retention debate, the question arises: “how can I stop the government getting its hands on my metadata?” Routinely, often non-technical journalists give the glib answer to “use encryption”, rattle off their favourite list of technologies, and over-simplify things to the point of danger …
snowden SXSW

Snowden tells tech bigwigs: It's up to you to thwart mass surveillance

SXSW 2015 In a quietly arranged Q&A session at South by Southwest (SXSW) on Sunday morning, Edward Snowden told about thirty influential people from the tech world that the onus for thwarting mass surveillance was falling to them. Snowden had previously spoken at SXSW with the American Civil Liberties Union, explaining to attendees the …
Logging onto Windows 10 with a mobile for 2-factor authentication

Yahoo! wheels! out! password! on-demand! service! for! simpletons!

Yahoo! is trialling a service that removes the need to remember your passwords, providing users aren't so absent-minded they don't also lose or mislay their mobile phones. The on-demand password service allows registered users to get a short password sent to their phone. On-demand passwords is an opt-in service, initially only …
John Leyden, 16 Mar 2015
padlock

Yahoo! spaffs! out! plugin! to! bring! crypto! to! everyone's! email!

Yahoo! has shown off an OpenPGP-based end-to-end e-mail encryption it says will be offered as a plug-in by the end of the year. Its aim is to make PGP-based encryption more accessible to the everyday layperson. Described in this blog post by Purple Palace chief information security officer Alex Stamos, the mail encryption …

CloudFlare launches nameserver DDoS shield

CloudFlare has launched a DNS proxy service it says will help organisations improve DNS resilience by pushing distributed denial of service attacks to the outer edge of its network. The Virtual DNS service is billed as a means for DNS providers to mitigate a potential "massive single point of failure" in their nameservers …
Darren Pauli, 11 Mar 2015

Reckon YOU can write better headlines than us? Great – apply within

Job The Register is expanding in the States: we're seeking a full-time US Production Editor to work in our San Francisco bureau in California. The successful applicant will work alongside our US editor and four reporters to prepare news, opinion and feature articles on the world of science and technology for our vast and …
Chris Williams, 27 Feb 2015
shutterstock_164559860

'If someone in Australia says lick my toad, it's not a euphemism'

CoTW The application of one's tongue to an Australian amphibian is no laughing matter. Neither, for that matter, are conspiracy theories around the launch of the Raspberry Pi 2 or love/hate reactions to Phil Zimmerman. Yes, it's Comment of the Week time. Opening this week's snorkworthy commentardery was Simple Si, who pitched up with …
Gareth Corfield, 07 Feb 2015

Zimmermann slams Cameron’s ‘absurd’ plans for crypto ban

Crypto pioneer Phil Zimmermann has labelled UK Prime Minister David Cameron’s anti-encryption plans as "absurd". Zimmermann, creator of the PGP email privacy package, countered Cameron's argument that encryption is creating a means for terrorists and child abusers to communicate in private, arguing instead that intelligence …
John Leyden, 03 Feb 2015

Tor de farce: NSA fails to decrypt anonymised network

A new round of NSA documents snatched by master blabbermouth Edward Snowden appeared online late on Sunday, revealing spooks' internet security pet hates. The latest dump of PDFs published by Der Spiegel appeared to show what the Five Eyes surveillance buddies – the USA, the UK, Australia, Canada and New Zealand – see as …
Kelly Fiveash, 29 Dec 2014
The "Buffalo" Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle. Credit: US Army

Online armour: Duncan Campbell's tech chief on anonymity 101

Crypto toolbox, Part II In the first article in this two-parter on building your own crypto toolbox I covered older tools that have been around for a relatively long time now: Truecrypt and OpenPGP. Here, I will go in a different direction and look at ways of protecting instant messaging, general web-browsing, and how to trust the operating system …
Matt Fowler, 26 Dec 2014
Onions

STAY AWAY: Popular Tor exit relays look raided

As foreshadowed last week, Tor network exit nodes have gone down after what appear to be raids by law enforcement authorities. Thomas White (@CthulhuSec) warned users to steer clear of his Tor servers after he lost control following what he's called "unusual activity" that meant "I have now lost control of all servers under the …
Darren Pauli, 22 Dec 2014
Man in suit of Viking armour

Armouring up online: Duncan Campbell's chief techie talks crypto with El Reg

Crypto toolbox, Part I I think I was about 15 or 16 when PGP was making headlines for being classified as munitions by the US government and was (supposedly) banned from export. While I wasn’t a subversive type at the time, I got a very strong sense that any software that scared the mighty USA so badly was something I ought to play with and try to …
Matt Fowler, 19 Dec 2014
Blackphone

Coming to Blackphone: An app store loaded with privacy tools

Blackphone handsets can download and install a major software update today – ahead of the opening of an online store for privacy-focused apps for the mobes. Blackphone It's cute, it's black, it saves you from attack, it's the Blackphone The Blackphone runs its own hardened version of Android, dubbed PrivatOS, on custom …
Iain Thomson, 09 Dec 2014