Articles about Paper Pdf

This speech recognition code is 'just as good' as a pro transcriber

Microsoft on Tuesday said that its researchers have "made a major breakthrough in speech recognition." In a paper [PDF] published a day earlier, Microsoft machine learning researchers describe how they developed an automated system that can recognize recorded speech as well as a professional transcriptionist. Using the NIST …
Thomas Claburn, 19 Oct 2016

Probe boffins: Two balls deep in Uranus's ring

Data from the first and only time mankind probed Uranus appears to show two new moons hiding in the dark rings that encircle the gas giant. Back in 1986, Voyager 2 skimmed past Uranus and found 10 new moons encircling the gas giant. Two of these, named Cordelia and Ophelia, occur on the outside of Uranus' rings, and the …
Iain Thomson, 19 Oct 2016

AI software should be able to register its own patents, law prof argues

The legal system may need to be changed to allow artificially intelligent computing systems to file their own patents, rather than their operators stealing all the glory. In a paper [PDF] titled I Think, Therefore I Invent: Creative Computers and the Future of Patent Law and published in the Boston College Law Review, Ryan …
Iain Thomson, 17 Oct 2016
Galaxies stretching back into time across billions of light-years of space. The image covers a portion of a large galaxy census called the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS).

New Brit Hubble analysis finds 2,000 billion galaxies, 10x previous count

Douglas Adams was right. Space is really big. New analysis of data from the Hubble Space Telescope and other observatories suggests there are ten times more galaxies out there than previously thought. The theory is advanced in a paper (PDF) titled “The Evolution of Galaxy Number Density at Z < 8 and its implications” that …
Simon Sharwood, 14 Oct 2016
Terminator head

How to steal the mind of an AI: Machine-learning models vulnerable to reverse engineering

Amazon, Baidu, Facebook, Google and Microsoft, among other technology companies, have been investing heavily in artificial intelligence and related disciplines like machine learning because they see the technology enabling services that become a source of revenue. Consultancy Accenture earlier this week quantified this …
Thomas Claburn, 01 Oct 2016

'Geek gene' denied: If you find computer science hard, it's your fault (or your teacher's)

Assume for the sake of argument that computer science grades are bimodal: there's a distinct group of students who excel at the subject, and then there's everyone else in another group. Computer science researchers at the University of Toronto – namely, Elizabeth Patitsas, Jesse Berlin, Michelle Craig, and Steve Easterbrook – …
Thomas Claburn, 28 Sep 2016

Cops blasted for relying on IP addresses to hunt down suspects

A new white paper from the Electronic Frontier Foundation argues that police rely too heavily on IP addresses when conducting criminal investigations. The paper [PDF], written by EFF executive director Cindy Cohn along with legal fellow Aaron Mackey and senior staff technologist Seth Schoen, argues that the numerical addresses …
Shaun Nichols, 23 Sep 2016

World's largest internet exchange sues Germany over mass surveillance

The world's largest internet exchange point is suing the German government for tapping its communications systems. DE-CIX runs a number of critical exchange points – most of them in Germany, but with others in France, Spain and the United States – and has sued the German interior ministry over orders from the German security …
Kieren McCarthy, 16 Sep 2016

Israeli Pentagon DDoSers explain their work, get busted by FBI

Two Israeli men have been arrested for running a distributed-denial-of service-as-a-service site, after one seemingly claimed to attack the Pentagon. Itay Huri and Yarden Bidani, released on US$10,000 bonds, were arrested following a tip off from the FBI, local news site TheMarker reports. A Twitter account using Bidani's …
Darren Pauli, 12 Sep 2016
dog noses around in fridge. photo by Shutterstock

Self-stocking internet fridge faces a delivery come down

Something for the Weekend, Sir? In the future, I will keep a vibrator in my shoes. This will allow me to walk down the street without having to hold it in my hands or stick it into my ear. My satnav smartphone, that is. With the help of Hi-Tec’s Navigator, vibrating pods in my footwear will guide me left and right along my walking route without recourse to …
Alistair Dabbs, 09 Sep 2016

FCC goes over the top again to battle America's cable-box rip-off

The US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is to take another crack at breaking the multi-billion-dollar consumer rip-off that is cable set-top boxes by setting the regulator up as a copyright office. FCC staff were briefing organizations late last week on the revised plan, prompting an angry letter from the cable industry …
Kieren McCarthy, 06 Sep 2016

Hacking mobile login tokens tricky but doable, says reverse-engineer

Mobile apps that generate on-screen tokens for two-factor authentication can be examined and cloned by malware, a security researcher warns. Fraudsters and crooks can take these clones and generate the codes necessary to login into bank accounts and other online services as their victims. Banks are increasingly relying on …
John Leyden, 02 Sep 2016
Linux hacking team

Linux security backfires: Flaw lets hackers inject malware into downloads, disrupt Tor users, etc

Analysis A flaw in the Linux kernel lets hackers inject malware into downloads and webpages, smash Tor connections, launch denial-of-service attacks, and more. This is a troubling security headache because Linux is used widely across the internet, from web servers to Android smartphones, tablets and smart TVs. The TCP/IP networking …
Iain Thomson, 10 Aug 2016
Samsung Pay

Samsung: Hackers can't pwn our NFC payment kit. No way, nuh-uh, not true (Well, OK, maybe)

A war of words has broken out after a security researcher claimed last week that Samsung's contactless mobile payment system is vulnerable to skimming and spoofing attacks. In talks at both the Black Hat and DEF CON security conferences, held last week in Las Vegas, Salvador Mendoza claimed that he was able to intercept a …
Iain Thomson, 10 Aug 2016
A bigger Boson? CMS/CERN

'New CERN particle' a fluke

Stand down folks, cancel the party. Show's over. The exciting new particle thought to have been discovered by CERN's ATLAS and CMS detectors in December has turned out to be noise. Eight months ago, the equipment picked up a small blip while scientists were busy throwing matter around the Large Hadron Collider. That got …
Chris Williams, 05 Aug 2016

Three times as bad as malware: Google shines light on pay-per-install

As some point you have probably downloaded a "free" piece of software only to find it has come with a whole host of other unwanted friends that go on to redirect your browser search bar or inject ads where there weren't any before. This is the world of pay-per-install (PPI) and Google, along with New York University and the …
Kieren McCarthy, 05 Aug 2016

Hackers detail the blood and guts of the 2016 Pwn2Own exploit expo

Black Hat Zero Day Initiative researchers have detailed the winning hacks of this year's Pwn2Own competition, painting a picture of broken browsers and owned systems. The quartet of Matt Molinyawe, Abdul-aziz Hariri, Jasiel Spelman, and Jason Smith of Trend Micro's Zero Day Initiative vulnerability clearing house detailed and …
Darren Pauli, 04 Aug 2016
Indian rupee

Mobile banking for the poor has flopped in India

India is trying to figure out why it has failed in efforts to replicate the success of mobile banking programs that have succeed in other countries. The nation noted with admiration programs like Kenya's M-Pesa, which made it possible for people living in rural and remote areas to access banking services with feature phones. …
Simon Sharwood, 03 Aug 2016

Diablo backers toss $18m in pot to forge software keys to XPoint DIMM kingdom

Analysis Things are looking up for Diablo Technologies. It has pulled in another $18m in funding and has tier 1 server OEMs qualifying its Memory1 flash-as-memory technology. Also the Netlist lawsuits seem to be going away. Back in January it announced a $19m C‑round of funding, taking total funding to $77.8m. That C‑round was kept …
Chris Mellor, 02 Aug 2016
Facebook laser receptor

Raving mad: Glow sticks are secret weapon in Facebook's 2.1Gbps laser internet drones

At Facebook's F8 Developer Conference this year, Mark Zuckerberg revealed more details about his laser-firing drones that will encircle the world and relay Facebook, sorry, the internet to far-flung places, reaching potentially all seven billion of us. The first solar-powered Aquila autonomous drones to do that job have now …
Iain Thomson, 20 Jul 2016
Pic: Shutterstock

Meet Riffle, the next-gen anonymity network that hopes to trounce Tor

Next week, top eggheads will unveil a new anonymizing internet tool that they claim is snoop-proof and faster and more reliable against attack than Tor. Dubbed Riffle, the system was developed by MIT and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland. It uses the same onion-encryption system as Tor, which wraps …
Iain Thomson, 13 Jul 2016
Boy with a backpack hides his eyes and cries. Pic by Shutterstock

A bad day for DBAs: MIT boffins are replacing you with a mere spreadsheet

MIT boffins reckon they've cracked one of the tough nuts of usability, creating an easy-to-use SQL interface for non-database administrators. The tool, SIEUFERD, has been in gestation since at least 2013 (Oracle mentions it here), but considering the problem it addresses has been around since the 1970s, let's not be harsh …
Container ship, photo via Dmitry Chulov Shutterstock

Rolls-Royce reckons robot cargo ships are the future of the seas

Comment Rolls-Royce and the Advanced Autonomous Waterborne Applications Initiative (AAWA) believe the future of cargo transportation is autonomous – and they have published an 88 page white paper (PDF) to prove it. The company outlined its vision of remote controlled cargo ships at the Autonomous Ship Technology Symposium in Amsterdam …
Matthew Griffin, 08 Jul 2016

FBI's iPhone paid-for hack should be barred, say ex-govt officials

The FBI's purchase of a hack to get into the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone should not have been allowed. That's according to a new paper from two former US government cybersecurity officials, Ari Schwartz and Rob Knake. In their paper [PDF] they dig into the current vulnerability equities process (VEP), disclosed in 2014, …
Kieren McCarthy, 17 Jun 2016
Police search

Your comms metadata is super-revealing but the law doesn't protect it

America's legal world needs to rethink what it considers people's private information so it can get a grip on today's spying techniques. Stemming from 1970s telephone laws, communications metadata – which details who you talk to, when and where etc – is considered by the courts to be separate from the actual contents of your …
Shaun Nichols, 08 Jun 2016

Flashy startup Apeiron wipes Splunk floor with XtremIO... says Apeiron

All-flash array startup Apeiron claims it blows EMC’s XtremIO away when it comes to Splunk speed testing. Splunk's software searches and analyses Big Data. Apeiron has an ADS1000 NVMe over fabrics-connected flash array built from NVMe flash drives. It does not use Fibre Channel or iSCSI switches to connect to accessing servers …
Chris Mellor, 07 Jun 2016
Selection of Australian banknotes

Oz infosec boffins call for mature threat debate

The University of NSW / Australian Defence Force Academy-run Australian Centre for Cybersecurity reckons the government needs to tip AU$1 billion annually into cyber-security. The centre reckons the AU$230 million the government intends to spend isn't enough. The reasoning is that our allies, such as the US and the UK, are …

FCC swivels to online privacy, gets bitten in the ass by net neutrality

Analysis When America's comms watchdog the FCC passed its net neutrality rules despite an onslaught of criticism from telcos, the world rejoiced. But, as many of us noted at the time, the Open Internet Order was achieved through an imperfect approach: equating internet providers with phone companies by deciding they are Title II …
Kieren McCarthy, 27 May 2016
Speedometer by Nathan E Photography, Flickr under CC2.0

Nokia offers up 10 Gbps HFC demo

Nokia Networks has applied the paddles to the chest of cable broadband, pumped in the volts, and sent it sprinting at 10 Gbps. While the company says the proof-of-concept work demonstrates the viability of CableLabs' DOCSIS 3.1 roadmap, it's not yet working directly with the group. The company showed off a demo of its XG- …
Image by EcoPrint

Archaeologists find oldest ever ground-edge stone axe

The world's oldest known ground-edge axe has been discovered in Australia's remote north Kimberley region, pushing back the date of the invention to some 49,000 years. It is estimated to be 10,000 years older than the previous oldest axe of its type, also found in Australia in 2010. The oldest so-called hafted axes - those …
Darren Pauli, 11 May 2016
Silhouette of spy discerning password from code uses a command on graphic user interface

SS7 spookery on the cheap allows hackers to impersonate mobile chat subscribers

Flaws in the mobile signalling protocols can be abused to read messaging apps such as WhatsApp and Telegram. Security researchers at Positive Technologies found they can intercept messages and respond as if they were the intended recipient in services such as WhatsApp or Telegram. This is not a man in the middle attack: …
John Leyden, 10 May 2016
image byemo

Daisy-chained research spells malware worm hell for power plants and other utilities

BlackHat Asia A world-first proof-of-concept worm - if unleashed - could spell disaster for the world’s critical infrastructure, including power utilities by making attacks exponentially more difficult to detect and stop. It is a stand-alone attack but The Register has confirmed a realistic stealthy end-to-end attack scenario can be …
Darren Pauli, 05 May 2016

TLS proxies: insecure by design say boffins

Have you ever suspected filters that decrypt traffic of being insecure? Canadian boffins agree with you, saying TLS proxies – commonly deployed in both business and home networks for traffic inspection – open up cans of worms. In their tests, “not a single TLS proxy implementation is secure with respect to all of our tests, …
space view of australia in arty green

Australia copies UK's Google tax on 'contrived' dodges

Australia has copied the United Kingdom's Government Digital Service and has now decided the UK's Google-busting Diverted Profits tax is also worth replicating. Australia's national budget was delivered on Tuesday and treasurer* Scott Morrison's speech introducing the year's planned government expenditure promised “a new …
Simon Sharwood, 05 May 2016

Big Cable threatens to sue FCC: You can't stop us ripping off customers

The US National Cable & Telecommunications Association (NCTA) has threatened to sue the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) if it pushes ahead with plans to open up cable boxes. Speaking at a press conference Thursday, the NCTA's president – and former FCC chair – Michael Powell said that the plan to force cable companies …
Kieren McCarthy, 21 Apr 2016
retro cartoon featuring two men fighting against cloud backdrop

Intel bins ESXi in in-house private cloud revamp

Intel's decided it can do without VMware's ESXi hypervisor as part of a big upgrade of its private cloud. Chipzilla's a Platinum Member of the OpenStack Foundation and therefore has a seat on the project's board. The company's also been building an OpenStack private cloud since around 2011, but built a customised …
Simon Sharwood, 14 Apr 2016
Canada&#39;s CHIME Telescope

Canada's CHIME telescope taps AMD for GPU-based super

Canada's under-construction CHIME telescope has taken a big step towards completion, announcing a contract that will put in place the high performance computing it needs. And AMD is over the moon about it: in line with the Canadian telescope's hope to use consumer-derived technology wherever possible, the project has anointed …

Apeiron reckons it's the Godzilla of upstart flash arrays

Storage upstart Apeiron's array is a Godzilla of all-flash arrays, delivering up to 3PB of capacity, 120-plus million IOPS and less than three microseconds' latency from a rackful of its ADS1000 array built from separate, scale-out, compute and storage nodes. Apeiron Data Systems has boldly stepped out from behind the stealth …
Chris Mellor, 29 Mar 2016

'Millions' of Android mobes vulnerable to new Stagefright exploit

A group of Israeli researchers reckon they've cracked the challenge of crafting a reliable exploit for the Stagefright vulnerability that emerged in Android last year. In a paper [PDF] that's a cookbook on how to build the exploit for yourself, they suggest millions of unpatched Android devices are vulnerable to their design, …
Dragster by Brett Levin, Flickr, CC 2.0 License

Web servers should give browsers a leg-up, say MIT boffins

Latency plus complexity, rather than bandwidth, are what strangles Web performance, and a bunch of MIT boffins reckon browsers haven't kept up. To get around that, they've proposed a scheme called Polaris – not the same thing as the Mozilla browser privacy project – to focus on the order in which page objects are loaded. The …
Fingerprint spoof kit

Boffins bust biometrics with inkjet printer

Boffins from Michigan State University have loaded up an inkjet printer with cartridges designed for printing electronic circuits, and used the output to fool smartphone fingerprint sensors. All that's needed is a scan of the victim's fingerprint (reversed so it presents the right way when printed), and a suitable inkjet …

Commodity flash just as good as enterprise drives, Google finds

If you're loading up a heap of flash drives for your data centre, don't bother with “enterprise-class” SLC (single level cell) technology, because cheaper MLC (multi-level cell) drives will do the job just as well. However, the data centre biz needs new techniques to predict drive failures, because the unrecoverable bit error …
Hard disk repair by William Warby cc 2.0 attribution generic

Google wants new class of taller 'cloud disk' with more platters and I/O

Google has shared a White Paper (PDF) in which it calls for major revisions to disk drive design. Titled “Disks for Data Centers”, the paper is unashamedly Google-centric inasmuch as it calls for disk-makers to rethink their products to suit the ad giant's needs. As the paper explains, those needs are very substantial: just …
Simon Sharwood, 26 Feb 2016

Tor users are actively discriminated against by website operators

Computer scientists have documented how a large and growing number of websites discriminate against people who browse them using Tor. Tor is an anonymity service that is maintained with assistance from the US State Department and designed in part to allows victims of censorship in countries like China and Iran to surf the web …
John Leyden, 25 Feb 2016

Defence white paper lands: Cyber-threat is huge, spend is small

The Australian government has revealed its Defence White Paper and it seems most of the AU$25 billion discussed in the context of all-the-cybers is going to be spent on drones. The electronic warfare and electronic security spend is much more modest, both in systems and in personnel. In total, the white paper devotes nine per …

Thanks for the extra memories, folks: Say hi to GridGain

GridGain Systems software provides an in-memory facility for running transactions, streaming and analytics applications using clustered x86 server nodes in a grid defined by a distributed, massively parallel architecture. It says its software enables such applications to run thousands of times faster than on disk-based systems …
Chris Mellor, 15 Feb 2016

UK NHS-backed health apps 'riddled with security flaws'

As if striking junior doctors weren’t enough, the UK's NHS also has technology worries, according to a study by app security firm Arxan. All of the NHS-approved apps Arxan audited lacked binary protection against code tampering, and most also lacked adequate protection in the transport layer. Flaws also emerged in FDA-approved …
John Leyden, 13 Jan 2016

The sloth is coming! Quick, get MD5 out of our internet protocols

The outdated and crackable MD5 hash function is still lingering in critical parts of the internet's infrastructure and could undermine security, researchers have warned. In a paper [PDF] published in time for a cryptography conference in Silicon Valley this week, the authors from French research institute INRIA note that while …
Kieren McCarthy, 06 Jan 2016
Joanna Rutkowska of Invisible Things Labs gives talk &quot;Towards (reasonably) trustworthy x86 laptops&quot; at ccc - still from youtube

Trustworthy x86 laptops? There is a way, says system-level security ace

32c3 Security concerns around Intel's x86 processors – such as the company's decision to force the secretive Management Engine microcontroller onto its silicon – have raised fundamental questions about trust in personal computers, whatever architectures they may be based upon. Youtube Video The founder of Invisible Things Labs, …
D-Wave chip

Google says its quantum computer is 100 million times faster than PC

Two years ago Google and NASA bought a D-Wave 2X quantum computing system and the Chocolate Factory has now pronounced itself very pleased with the results. "We found that for problem instances involving nearly 1000 binary variables, quantum annealing significantly outperforms its classical counterpart, simulated annealing. It …
Iain Thomson, 09 Dec 2015