Articles about Paper Pdf

Robot looks into magnifying glass, human eye displayed. Photo by Shutterstock

Meet LogicLocker: Boffin-built SCADA ransomware

Let's start with the “calm down” part of the article: yes, LogicLocker is ransomware designed for programmable logic controllers, but no, the cyber-geddon isn't upon us. LogicLocker is a proof-of-concept written by David Formby, Srikar Durbha and Raheem Beyah of Georgia Tech (Formby and Beyah also disclose an affiliation with …

Brexit White Paper published: Broad strokes, light on detail

The UK government has published its long-awaited white paper on negotiating a withdrawal from the European Union. Number 10's 77-page paper [PDF] mixes a list of desired outcomes in business and technology with the government's existing statements on national plans. The paper is light on detail but big on statements and broad …
Gavin Clarke, 02 Feb 2017

Felted! AI poker bot Libratus cleans out pros in grueling tournament, smugly trousers $1.8m

Analysis Machines have triumphed again. Libratus, a powerful computer program, has crushed its human opponents at a heads-up no-limit Texas hold’em poker tournament held at Rivers Casino in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, winning $1,776,250 over 120,000 hands. It’s a landmark achievement in AI game playing, said Tuomas Sandholm, co-creator …
Katyanna Quach, 01 Feb 2017
an exosuit prototype

Forget Tony Stark's Iron Man – exosuits of the future will be spandex

Exosuits have featured prominently in comic books and films for decades, but as they move from research labs to the work environment, they're looking more like couture from Robin Hood: Men in Tights than artifacts from Iron Man. Exosuits, or exoskeletons, that assist human activity date back to the late 19th century, but weren …
Thomas Claburn, 25 Jan 2017
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Human bot hybrid finds LinkedIn email, phone number-filching holes

LinkedIn has shuttered five dangerous privacy holes that could have allowed users' phone numbers, email addresses and resumes to be downloaded, plus the deletion of all connection requests. The flaws, since patched, were found by the first human-bot hacking hybrid, the brainchild of Bangalore security boffin Rahul Sasi. Sasi …
Darren Pauli, 25 Jan 2017

Yes, just what they need: Curious Dr MISFA injects a healthy dose of curiosity into robots

Computer scientists in Germany hope to make humanoid robots smarter by programming the 'droids with a sense of “artificial curiosity.” The bots gain their inquisitiveness from an algorithm dubbed Curious Dr MISFA, which is described in this paper [PDF] that appeared on arXiv this month. The software uses unsupervised and …
Katyanna Quach, 24 Jan 2017

Machine-learning boffins 'summon demons' in AI to find exploitable bugs

Surrounded by all the hype in AI, it’s easy to sing the praises of machine learning without realizing that systems can be easily exploited. As governments, businesses, and hospitals are beginning to explore the use of machine learning for data analysis and decision making, it’s important to bolster security. In a paper [PDF] …
Katyanna Quach, 24 Jan 2017
Image by ALESYA LS https://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-168750824p1.html

Chrome dev explains how modern browsers make secure UI just about impossible

Google Chrome engineer Eric Lawrence has described the battle of browser barons against the 'line of death', an ever-diminishing demarcation between trusted content and the no-man's land where phishers dangle their poison. The line, Lawrence (@ericlaw) says, is a conceptual barrier between content that browser developers …
Darren Pauli, 19 Jan 2017
Plan b, image via Shutterstock

Why Theresa May’s hard Brexit might be softer than you think

Analysis The reality of red tape might mean the UK’s exit from the EU will take longer, and be softer, than the Prime Minister outlined today. Theresa May ruled out “partial” membership of the EU in a bullish speech today. The UK would conclude a free trade agreement (FTA) within the two years permitted by the Article 50 process, she …
Andrew Orlowski, 17 Jan 2017
Mom backseat driving photo by shutterstock

Revealed: How Nvidia's 'backseat driver' AI learned to read lips

When Nvidia popped the bonnet on its Co-Pilot "backseat driver" AI at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show, most onlookers were struck by its ability to lip-read while tracking CES-going "motorists'" actions within the "car". A slide taken at CES shows the Co-Pilot AI assistant performing four features: facial recognition, …
Katyanna Quach, 17 Jan 2017

AI shoves all in: DeepStack, Libratus poker bots battle Texas Hold 'em pros heads up

DeepStack is the first AI computer programme to beat professional poker players in a game of hands-on no-limit Texas hold’em, a team of researchers claim in a research paper out this week. The use of games to train and test AI is prolific. Surpassing human-level performance in a game is considered an impressive feat, and a …
Katyanna Quach, 14 Jan 2017

Everything wrong with IoT (and how to fix it) – according to Uncle Sam

The US Department of Commerce has published a green paper [PDF] on the Internet of Things, the first step in a process to develop formal governmental policies on the technology. Following a public request for comments back in April, the green paper attempts to summarize what a large number of companies, advocacy groups and …
Kieren McCarthy, 13 Jan 2017

LinkedIn, eBay founders and pals kick in $27m to bring Jesus to AI bots

LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman and eBay founder Pierre Omidyar are among a bunch of investors bankrolling a $27m fund to further AI ethics and accountability. Specifically, the dosh will be used to bring non-engineers and people who haven't studied data science into the world of machine learning – from lawyers and economists to …
Katyanna Quach, 11 Jan 2017

Fatal genetic conditions could return in some 'three-parent' babies

Troubling new findings have been discovered that could affect the lives of (misleadingly* branded) "three-parent" offspring born thanks to breakthrough mitochondrial replacement therapy. The technique grabbed the world's attention when in September a baby was born bearing the DNA of three parents, a feat that overcame the …
Darren Pauli, 05 Jan 2017
Australian Parliament House Canberra

Australian Internet policy remains years behind reality

That Australian policy-makers cannot muster a coherent and consistent approach to the changes wrought by the internet has again been made apparent in recent weeks, by a number of events. The national response to the internet remains, most often, to attempt to control it long after accepted practice makes the attempt to do so …
Simon Sharwood, 22 Dec 2016
HYDRAstor_node

NEC mentions it has a high-end dedupe disk backup box, stretches, yawns for 40 seconds

Analysis NEC has the biggest, baddest scale-out deduping backup-to-disk array on the planet and we virtually never hear about it. NEC is not a top-six purpose-built backup supplier, according to IDC, being neither a unit ship or revenue leader. Yet there are 1,100 customers and 1,800 installations, around three exabytes under …
Chris Mellor, 13 Dec 2016

Well, FC-NVMe. Did this lightning-fast protocol just get faster?

+Comment A walk through the vast and spacious exhibition arena at HPE Discover in London can bring you to Cavium's stand. There Roberto Angelo Polacsek, a senior account exec, will tell you why he believes NVMe over Fibre Channel will be important. Cavium bought Fibre Channel HBA vendor QLogic recently, and Polacsek says its 16Gbps HBAs …
Chris Mellor, 30 Nov 2016

Secretions on your phone reveal your secrets

Mobile phones may reveal as much about their owners as the data inside them, a finding that complicates device privacy issues. In a paper [PDF] published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers found that by sampling chemicals deposited on mobile phones through regular usage, they could learn about …
Thomas Claburn, 15 Nov 2016
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GSMA: 5G at risk if governments don't get their acts together

The mobile industry's global lobby, the GSMA, is starting to worry about fragmentation in the 5G market – even before there is one. There are already hints at disunity in the spectrum market, with the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) yet to settle regional arguments about spectrum, while vendors and carriers run …
Password

Stolen passwords integrated into the ultimate dictionary attack

Targeted password guessing turns out to be significantly easier than it should be, thanks to the online availability of personal information, leaked passwords associated with other accounts, and our tendency to incorporate personal data into our security codes. In a paper [PDF] presented at the ACM Conference of Communication …
Thomas Claburn, 15 Nov 2016
EM Drive

Leaked paper suggests EM Drive tested by NASA actually works

An unpublished scientific paper by NASA engineers has been leaked. It appears to show that the EM Drive – a form of space drive that appears to produce thrust by electricity alone, in violation of Newton's Third Law of physics – may actually work. The EM Drive is the brainchild of British inventor Roger Shawyer but is highly …
Iain Thomson, 09 Nov 2016
shutterstock_215940778

Apple, Mozilla kill API to deplete W3C battery-snitching standard

Apple and Mozilla are leading the charge away from a W3C standard, because it's too much of a privacy risk. The Register reported the battery-snitching capability in August 2015. The W3C's idea was that if HTML included properties to look at the state of user's batteries, it could de-cruft the Web pages it served if your …

AI boffins turn to StarCraft to train future neural networks

StarCraft could be the next battleground for AI, as researchers create an open framework that tests deep-learning methods in the real-time strategy game. Teaching AI to play games is serious business. Games act like milestones; when a machine is superior to humans at playing difficult games, it’s a sign that its neural net has …
Katyanna Quach, 04 Nov 2016

This speech recognition code is 'just as good' as a pro transcriber

Microsoft on Tuesday said that its researchers have "made a major breakthrough in speech recognition." In a paper [PDF] published a day earlier, Microsoft machine learning researchers describe how they developed an automated system that can recognize recorded speech as well as a professional transcriptionist. Using the NIST …
Thomas Claburn, 19 Oct 2016
Uranus

Probe boffins: Two balls deep in Uranus's ring

Data from the first and only time mankind probed Uranus appears to show two new moons hiding in the dark rings that encircle the gas giant. Back in 1986, Voyager 2 skimmed past Uranus and found 10 new moons encircling the gas giant. Two of these, named Cordelia and Ophelia, occur on the outside of Uranus' rings, and the …
Iain Thomson, 19 Oct 2016
Futurama

AI software should be able to register its own patents, law prof argues

The legal system may need to be changed to allow artificially intelligent computing systems to file their own patents, rather than their operators stealing all the glory. In a paper [PDF] titled I Think, Therefore I Invent: Creative Computers and the Future of Patent Law and published in the Boston College Law Review, Ryan …
Iain Thomson, 17 Oct 2016
Galaxies stretching back into time across billions of light-years of space. The image covers a portion of a large galaxy census called the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS).

New Brit Hubble analysis finds 2,000 billion galaxies, 10x previous count

Douglas Adams was right. Space is really big. New analysis of data from the Hubble Space Telescope and other observatories suggests there are ten times more galaxies out there than previously thought. The theory is advanced in a paper (PDF) titled “The Evolution of Galaxy Number Density at Z < 8 and its implications” that …
Simon Sharwood, 14 Oct 2016
Terminator head

How to steal the mind of an AI: Machine-learning models vulnerable to reverse engineering

Amazon, Baidu, Facebook, Google and Microsoft, among other technology companies, have been investing heavily in artificial intelligence and related disciplines like machine learning because they see the technology enabling services that become a source of revenue. Consultancy Accenture earlier this week quantified this …
Thomas Claburn, 01 Oct 2016

'Geek gene' denied: If you find computer science hard, it's your fault (or your teacher's)

Assume for the sake of argument that computer science grades are bimodal: there's a distinct group of students who excel at the subject, and then there's everyone else in another group. Computer science researchers at the University of Toronto – namely, Elizabeth Patitsas, Jesse Berlin, Michelle Craig, and Steve Easterbrook – …
Thomas Claburn, 28 Sep 2016

Cops blasted for relying on IP addresses to hunt down suspects

A new white paper from the Electronic Frontier Foundation argues that police rely too heavily on IP addresses when conducting criminal investigations. The paper [PDF], written by EFF executive director Cindy Cohn along with legal fellow Aaron Mackey and senior staff technologist Seth Schoen, argues that the numerical addresses …
Shaun Nichols, 23 Sep 2016

World's largest internet exchange sues Germany over mass surveillance

The world's largest internet exchange point is suing the German government for tapping its communications systems. DE-CIX runs a number of critical exchange points – most of them in Germany, but with others in France, Spain and the United States – and has sued the German interior ministry over orders from the German security …
Kieren McCarthy, 16 Sep 2016

Israeli Pentagon DDoSers explain their work, get busted by FBI

Two Israeli men have been arrested for running a distributed-denial-of service-as-a-service site, after one seemingly claimed to attack the Pentagon. Itay Huri and Yarden Bidani, released on US$10,000 bonds, were arrested following a tip off from the FBI, local news site TheMarker reports. A Twitter account using Bidani's …
Darren Pauli, 12 Sep 2016
dog noses around in fridge. photo by Shutterstock

Self-stocking internet fridge faces a delivery come down

Something for the Weekend, Sir? In the future, I will keep a vibrator in my shoes. This will allow me to walk down the street without having to hold it in my hands or stick it into my ear. My satnav smartphone, that is. With the help of Hi-Tec’s Navigator, vibrating pods in my footwear will guide me left and right along my walking route without recourse to …
Alistair Dabbs, 09 Sep 2016

FCC goes over the top again to battle America's cable-box rip-off

The US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is to take another crack at breaking the multi-billion-dollar consumer rip-off that is cable set-top boxes by setting the regulator up as a copyright office. FCC staff were briefing organizations late last week on the revised plan, prompting an angry letter from the cable industry …
Kieren McCarthy, 06 Sep 2016

Hacking mobile login tokens tricky but doable, says reverse-engineer

Mobile apps that generate on-screen tokens for two-factor authentication can be examined and cloned by malware, a security researcher warns. Fraudsters and crooks can take these clones and generate the codes necessary to login into bank accounts and other online services as their victims. Banks are increasingly relying on …
John Leyden, 02 Sep 2016
Linux hacking team

Linux security backfires: Flaw lets hackers inject malware into downloads, disrupt Tor users, etc

Analysis A flaw in the Linux kernel lets hackers inject malware into downloads and webpages, smash Tor connections, launch denial-of-service attacks, and more. This is a troubling security headache because Linux is used widely across the internet, from web servers to Android smartphones, tablets and smart TVs. The TCP/IP networking …
Iain Thomson, 10 Aug 2016
Samsung Pay

Samsung: Hackers can't pwn our NFC payment kit. No way, nuh-uh, not true (Well, OK, maybe)

A war of words has broken out after a security researcher claimed last week that Samsung's contactless mobile payment system is vulnerable to skimming and spoofing attacks. In talks at both the Black Hat and DEF CON security conferences, held last week in Las Vegas, Salvador Mendoza claimed that he was able to intercept a …
Iain Thomson, 10 Aug 2016
A bigger Boson? CMS/CERN

'New CERN particle' a fluke

Stand down folks, cancel the party. Show's over. The exciting new particle thought to have been discovered by CERN's ATLAS and CMS detectors in December has turned out to be noise. Eight months ago, the equipment picked up a small blip while scientists were busy throwing matter around the Large Hadron Collider. That got …
Chris Williams, 05 Aug 2016

Three times as bad as malware: Google shines light on pay-per-install

As some point you have probably downloaded a "free" piece of software only to find it has come with a whole host of other unwanted friends that go on to redirect your browser search bar or inject ads where there weren't any before. This is the world of pay-per-install (PPI) and Google, along with New York University and the …
Kieren McCarthy, 05 Aug 2016

Hackers detail the blood and guts of the 2016 Pwn2Own exploit expo

Black Hat Zero Day Initiative researchers have detailed the winning hacks of this year's Pwn2Own competition, painting a picture of broken browsers and owned systems. The quartet of Matt Molinyawe, Abdul-aziz Hariri, Jasiel Spelman, and Jason Smith of Trend Micro's Zero Day Initiative vulnerability clearing house detailed and …
Darren Pauli, 04 Aug 2016
Indian rupee

Mobile banking for the poor has flopped in India

India is trying to figure out why it has failed in efforts to replicate the success of mobile banking programs that have succeed in other countries. The nation noted with admiration programs like Kenya's M-Pesa, which made it possible for people living in rural and remote areas to access banking services with feature phones. …
Simon Sharwood, 03 Aug 2016

Diablo backers toss $18m in pot to forge software keys to XPoint DIMM kingdom

Analysis Things are looking up for Diablo Technologies. It has pulled in another $18m in funding and has tier 1 server OEMs qualifying its Memory1 flash-as-memory technology. Also the Netlist lawsuits seem to be going away. Back in January it announced a $19m C‑round of funding, taking total funding to $77.8m. That C‑round was kept …
Chris Mellor, 02 Aug 2016
Facebook laser receptor

Raving mad: Glow sticks are secret weapon in Facebook's 2.1Gbps laser internet drones

At Facebook's F8 Developer Conference this year, Mark Zuckerberg revealed more details about his laser-firing drones that will encircle the world and relay Facebook, sorry, the internet to far-flung places, reaching potentially all seven billion of us. The first solar-powered Aquila autonomous drones to do that job have now …
Iain Thomson, 20 Jul 2016
Pic: Shutterstock

Meet Riffle, the next-gen anonymity network that hopes to trounce Tor

Next week, top eggheads will unveil a new anonymizing internet tool that they claim is snoop-proof and faster and more reliable against attack than Tor. Dubbed Riffle, the system was developed by MIT and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland. It uses the same onion-encryption system as Tor, which wraps …
Iain Thomson, 13 Jul 2016
Boy with a backpack hides his eyes and cries. Pic by Shutterstock

A bad day for DBAs: MIT boffins are replacing you with a mere spreadsheet

MIT boffins reckon they've cracked one of the tough nuts of usability, creating an easy-to-use SQL interface for non-database administrators. The tool, SIEUFERD, has been in gestation since at least 2013 (Oracle mentions it here), but considering the problem it addresses has been around since the 1970s, let's not be harsh …
Container ship, photo via Dmitry Chulov Shutterstock

Rolls-Royce reckons robot cargo ships are the future of the seas

Comment Rolls-Royce and the Advanced Autonomous Waterborne Applications Initiative (AAWA) believe the future of cargo transportation is autonomous – and they have published an 88 page white paper (PDF) to prove it. The company outlined its vision of remote controlled cargo ships at the Autonomous Ship Technology Symposium in Amsterdam …
Matthew Griffin, 08 Jul 2016

FBI's iPhone paid-for hack should be barred, say ex-govt officials

The FBI's purchase of a hack to get into the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone should not have been allowed. That's according to a new paper from two former US government cybersecurity officials, Ari Schwartz and Rob Knake. In their paper [PDF] they dig into the current vulnerability equities process (VEP), disclosed in 2014, …
Kieren McCarthy, 17 Jun 2016
Police search

Your comms metadata is super-revealing but the law doesn't protect it

America's legal world needs to rethink what it considers people's private information so it can get a grip on today's spying techniques. Stemming from 1970s telephone laws, communications metadata – which details who you talk to, when and where etc – is considered by the courts to be separate from the actual contents of your …
Shaun Nichols, 08 Jun 2016

Flashy startup Apeiron wipes Splunk floor with XtremIO... says Apeiron

All-flash array startup Apeiron claims it blows EMC’s XtremIO away when it comes to Splunk speed testing. Splunk's software searches and analyses Big Data. Apeiron has an ADS1000 NVMe over fabrics-connected flash array built from NVMe flash drives. It does not use Fibre Channel or iSCSI switches to connect to accessing servers …
Chris Mellor, 07 Jun 2016
Selection of Australian banknotes

Oz infosec boffins call for mature threat debate

The University of NSW / Australian Defence Force Academy-run Australian Centre for Cybersecurity reckons the government needs to tip AU$1 billion annually into cyber-security. The centre reckons the AU$230 million the government intends to spend isn't enough. The reasoning is that our allies, such as the US and the UK, are …