Articles about Navy

How's this for irony? US Navy hit with $600m software piracy claim

A German software developer has accused the United States Navy of illegally copying $596m worth of its product. Bitmanagement Software GmbH claims that the Navy has copied "hundreds of thousands" of copies of its 3D modeling and tracking software BS Contact Geo without paying. They have filed suit [PDF] in the US Court of …
Shaun Nichols, 20 Jul 2016
Robots2, image via Shutterstock

A journey down the UK's '3D Tongue' into its mini industrial revolution

One of the few "horizon" technologies that is really making a difference right now is 3D printing. While other "big hope" concepts such as genetic engineering, nanotech and quantum physics have yet to make much of an impact, 3D has been making immediate inroads into traditional, sometimes ancient manufacturing techniques. …
Marcus Gibson, 12 Jul 2016
Container ship, photo via Dmitry Chulov Shutterstock

Rolls-Royce reckons robot cargo ships are the future of the seas

Comment Rolls-Royce and the Advanced Autonomous Waterborne Applications Initiative (AAWA) believe the future of cargo transportation is autonomous – and they have published an 88 page white paper (PDF) to prove it. The company outlined its vision of remote controlled cargo ships at the Autonomous Ship Technology Symposium in Amsterdam …
Matthew Griffin, 08 Jul 2016
F-35Bs fly past HMS Queen Elizabeth at Rosyth dockyard, Scotland. Crown copyright

Blighty will have a whopping 24 F-35B jets by 2023 – MoD minister

The UK is “on target” for its new F-35B fighters to reach initial operating capability by 2018 – and will own a whopping 24 of the state-of-the-art jets by the year 2023, junior defence minister Philip Dunne told a briefing at the Royal International Air Tattoo (RIAT) this morning. Dunne was speaking to a morning briefing at …
Gareth Corfield, 08 Jul 2016

Man killed in gruesome Tesla autopilot crash was saved by his car's software weeks earlier

An investigation was launched today after the driver of a Tesla was killed in what is understood to be a malfunction of the car's autopilot. Joshua Brown, a 40-year-old Ohio man, was killed on May 7 while driving his 2015 Tesla Model S on Route 27 in Florida. The car was using the optional autopilot system, which controls the …
Iain Thomson, 30 Jun 2016
The first RAF F-35B Lightning II to land in the UK. Crown copyright

Lightning strikes: Britain's first F-35B supersonic fighter lands

The first of the Royal Air Force's new F-35B Joint Strike Fighter jets landed on British soil last night, heralding a new era for the Royal Air Force. The supersonic Lightning II, as it will be known in RAF service, was flown across the Atlantic by RAF Squadron Leader Hugh Nicols, in the company of two US Marine Corps F-35Bs …
Gareth Corfield, 30 Jun 2016
US Navy man crawling under barbed wire in tough mudder competition

Ericsson: 5G migration won't be a terrifying slog. No. We have ‘plug-ins’

Analysis All the network equipment providers are engaged in major operator projects which they hope will guarantee them a place in those MNOs’ 5G rollouts in the coming years. This week, it was certainly the turn of Ericsson to score 5G marketing points, with a series of operator engagements around the world, and the announcement of 5G …
Wireless Watch, 24 Jun 2016
Cheban's blingy watch

Sirin Labs' Solarin isn't for pro-privacy bankers. It's for rich execs who want bling

El Reg got hands-on with the Solarin $14,000 ultra-high-end Android smartphone during a trip to Tel Aviv this week. As previously reported, the Solarin handset is an Android-based smartphone pitched at privacy-conscious executives and the ultra-wealthy. The smartphone comes with a 24 megapixel camera and integrated 3D audio …
John Leyden, 20 Jun 2016

Rogue Somerset vulture lands at Royal Navy airbase

UPDATED The "massive great big" vulture which went AWOL in Somerset last week has indeed proved as "hard to miss" as his owners promised, after he was spotted at Royal Naval Air Station Yeovilton yesterday. According to Birds of Prey Displays, Arthur – a white-headed vulture – was carried away by strong winds during a performance at …
Lester Haines, 07 Jun 2016

UK eyes frikkin' Laser Directed Energy Weapon

The UK's Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) is considering several contenders to supply a Laser Directed Energy Weapon (LDEW) for evaluation as part of a programme which could "ultimately could see the MOD fund a full-up programme to buy defensive laser weapon system". According to this report, companies …
Lester Haines, 26 May 2016
HiFire 5B launch

Hypersonic flight test hits Mach 7.5

Australia's venerable Woomera rocket range last week hosted a successful hypersonic test in which the experimental HiFiRE rocket hit Mach 7.5 and an apogee of 278 km. The data-gathering experiment wasn't testing a hypersonic motor – sorry “Sydney to London in two hours” fans – but rather carried instruments to observe the …
flag.South Korea

South Korea fingers North for defence contractor hack

South Korea is fingering its northern neighbours for an attack last month against a navy defence contractor. North Korea's regime says the attribution is political and dubbed the attacks fabricated. Details of the hack of Hanjin Heavy Industries have not been disclosed but local broadcaster Yonhap reports the government has …
Darren Pauli, 11 May 2016
Prison

Chinese con-artists cop to US military counterfeit chip switch caper

Chinese national Daofu Zhang has pleaded guilty to conspiring to buy top-end field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) stolen from a US Navy base and replacing the swiped silicon with counterfeit duds. Last Friday, in Connecticut's New Haven federal court, Zhang, 40, admitted offering to purchase military-spec chips from a US …
HMS Vengeance returns to HMNB Clyde. Crown copyright

Blighty's nuclear deterrent will get a software upgrade amid cyber-war fears

Software powering Britain's nuclear-tipped Trident II missiles is to be updated following fears of a cyber-attack, according to reports. The Daily Telegraph reported that Britain's Trident missiles, currently carried by the Royal Navy's Vanguard-class submarines, are to receive software updates to help guard against cyber- …
Gareth Corfield, 31 Mar 2016
wham_bang by Roy Lichtenstein

Cyberthreat: How to respond...and when

Spotting threats in cyberspace is like star gazing. There are lots of them out there, but telling them apart and working out which ones are about to go supernova takes experience and skill. You don’t want to pour the same resource into protecting yourself against every single perceived threat, because no budget can support …
Danny Bradbury, 23 Mar 2016

What are you doing to spot a breach?

Technology moves quickly, not just in legitimate business, but in the cybercriminal world too. Advanced attack tools are now available on the black market, lowering the barrier to entry for the average online lowlife. They are happy to target large and small organizations alike, and they only have to be lucky once. Security …
Robin Birtstone, 08 Mar 2016

Activist investor tells dot-word biz to sell off 'garbage' new domains

One of the biggest names in the domain name market, Rightside, has been hit with a broadside from an activist investor. J Carlo Cannell, who owns 7 per cent of the public company through his Cannell Capital company, filed an extraordinary and at times abusive letter with the SEC in which he outlined his frustration with the …
Kieren McCarthy, 02 Mar 2016
AI pioneer Marvin Minsky at a talk in Germany in 2006. Photo by Steamtalks CC 2.0

AI pioneer Marvin Minsky dies at 88

Obituary Marvin Minsky, one of the founders of the field of Artificial Intelligence, and an inspiration to generations of researchers, has died. Minsky was a philosopher and a scientist, as well as an adored and decorated academic. Among these decorations was the Turing Award in 1969, and an induction as a Fellow of the Computer …
USS Stockdale

The next Cuban gristle crisis: US Navy warship powered by beef fat

The USS Stockdale, a guided-missile-launching destroyer, has set sail powered by an unusual fuel – waste beef fat. The ship, deployed this week in the USS John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group, is part of the Navy's Great Green Fleet initiative, which is trying to make swabbies more environmentally friendly by using alternative …
Iain Thomson, 22 Jan 2016
Facepalm by https://www.flickr.com/photos/the-magic-tuba-pixie/ cc 2.0 attribution generic https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

PDF redaction is hard, NSW Medical Council finds out - the hard way

Australian public sector agencies have a persistent problem trying to redact PDFs: this time, the guilty party is the Medical Council of NSW. The council breached the privacy of a doctor and her son, the Medical Tribunal found earlier this month, because it mishandled redacting their names out of a PDF it published on its …
US Navy man crawling under barbed wire in tough mudder competition

Europe, China line up their best bureaucrats for epic 5G battle

European and Chinese telco bureaucrats are stripped and ripped and ready for four years of obstacle-course-racing to make sure their 5G is the 5G for the whole world. Although Europe and China are officially cooperating on 5G standards, both sides want their patents to be the best patents, their standards to be the best …

No, drone owners – all our base are belong to US, thunders military

After unwrapping your new drone on Christmas Day, do us a massive solid and don't fly it near our bases, the US military seems to be saying. Apparently, in the past 12 months, there have been 35 cases of personal quadcopters flying too close to government aircraft and airfields, plus about 1,000 complaints of small drones …
Chris Williams, 24 Dec 2015

Chicago cops under fire for astonishingly high dashcam, mic failures

Analysis More than one in ten dashboard cameras and 80 per cent of microphones don't work on any given day, according to a review of the Chicago Police's recording equipment. The incredibly high failure rate has led to some pointed questions, and added to a general sense of distrust of officers in The Second City. It follows the …
Kieren McCarthy, 21 Dec 2015
Screengrab of a control room in new Royal Navy aircraft carrier. One of the screens sports unmistakable Windows XP desktop

Windows for Warships? Not on our new aircraft carriers, says MoD

Britain's new Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers will be Windows XP-free zones, the Ministry of Defence has confirmed to The Register. Readers made us aware that a technician working aboard HMS Queen Elizabeth itself, which is a year away from completion, had the famous Windows XP rolling hills desktop background used by …
Paul Kunert, 18 Dec 2015
Screengrab of a control room in new Royal Navy aircraft carrier. One of the screens sports unmistakable Windows XP desktop

Windows XP spotted on Royal Navy's spanking new aircraft carrier

The Royal Navy’s new aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth appears to be using Windows XP. The ship is a year from completion, so there is plenty of time yet to bin it for a more up-to-date and secure version of the venerable operating system. The Ministry of Defence is not returning our calls, but this could always be, as one …
Drew Cullen, 15 Dec 2015

VMware finds back door for US military mega-deal, but Nutanix, Citrix protest again

VMware's foes have again protested its attempts to strike a new deal with much of the US military. VMware spent much of 2014 chasing the US$1.6bn, five-year deal, which was to cover the US Army, Navy, Air Force and Defense Information Systems Agency. That deal was controversial because it was done under “A Justification For …
Simon Sharwood, 11 Dec 2015

US Navy's newest ship sets sail with Captain James Kirk at the bridge

The US Navy's largest destroyer has finally set sail. And at its helm is Captain James Kirk. The USS Zumwalt, named after Admiral Elmo Zumwalt, has embarked on its first open ocean trials after eight years of construction. The $4bn Zumwalt is at the cutting edge of technology and will be the first of three in its class ( …
Kieren McCarthy, 09 Dec 2015
Cat 5 cable

Conficker, back from the undead, dominates malware threat landscape

Conficker was the most common malware used to attack UK and international organisations in October, accounting for 20 per cent of all attacks globally, according to security vendor Check Point. When it first appeared in November 2008, the Windows-affecting Conficker worm caused all manner of problems mainly because of its …
John Leyden, 01 Dec 2015
Still from Julien Solomita video of US Trident test-shot

Trident test-shot startles West Coast Americans

Video The US Navy has challenged Orson Welles in the UFO-panic stakes: an un-announced (and thankfully unarmed) Trident missile test over the weekend caught citizens by surprise and sparked a YouTube frenzy. The brasshats decided to launch the missile from an Ohio-class submarine, and while they prudently set up a no-fly zone in the …

Oz submarine bidders paper over hack attacks, deliver tenders by hand

Hacking attempts are forcing bidders in Germany, France, and Japan for Australia's A$50 billion submarine contract to rely on hand-delivery for sensitive information. The attacks are merely repeat attempts and there is no evidence so far of any breach, The Australian reports. Previously suspected but unreported, the news …
Darren Pauli, 09 Nov 2015
zombie_648

American military sites secured with dud SHA-1 cipher

America, your military fails at security. That's the message from Netcraft security expert Paul Mutton, who has found a bunch of Department of Defence (DoD) agencies issuing SHA-1 certificates. SHA-1 is almost as old as the art of war: created in 1995, it was secure then, but now, you only need US$75,000 to buy enough cloud …

Fully working U-Boat Enigma machine sells for $365,000

A fully-functioning four-rotor M4 Enigma WW2 cipher machine has sold at auction for $365,000. The M4 Enigma which sold at auction yesterday. Pic: Bonhams Rare and pricey. Pic: Bonhams The German encryption device, as used by the U-Boat fleet and described as "one of the rarest of all the Enigma machines", went under the …
Lester Haines, 23 Oct 2015
Ronnie Barker and Tenniel Evans in The Navy Lark

Navy engineer gets 11 years for attempted espionage

A civilian US naval engineer has been sentenced to 11 years in prison for attempted espionage, after passing military technology secrets to an FBI undercover agent posing as an Egyptian intelligence officer. The Register can report that 36-year-old Mostafa Ahmed Awwad "took advantage of his position of trust within the Navy to …
navigation

US Navy grabs old-fashioned sextants amid hacker attack fears

Sextants have been off the curriculum for naval officers in the US for over a decade, but now the swabbies have reinstituted celestial navigation classes over hacking fears. The US Navy discontinued celestial navigation courses in 1998 because GPS made the old style of navigating redundant. Working out your position the old- …
Iain Thomson, 14 Oct 2015
Ronnie Barker: All I Ever Wrote book cover

Ten years on: Ronnie Barker, Pismonouncers Unanimous founder, remembered

Feature It’s ten years ago today that much-loved comedian, writer and actor Ronnie Barker passed away. By then, despite having retired way back in 1987, he had already won four BAFTAs, a Royal Television Society award for Outstanding Creative Achievement and been made an OBE. Ronnie Barker – Mispronunciation Sketch He’d also produced …
Phil Strongman, 03 Oct 2015
 CRAY-1 on display in the hallways of the EPFL in Lausanne.

The Steve Jobs of supercomputers: We remember Seymour Cray

Before Steve Jobs, there was Seymour Cray – father of the supercomputer and regarded as something close to a God in the circles he moved in. Jobs’ Apple Computer is reputed to have bought one of Seymour’s massive machines back in the day: a Cray, to design the brand-new Macintosh personal computer. This would have been a …
Gavin Clarke, 02 Oct 2015
Welchman’s book and a portrait of him painted by his second wife, cubist painter Fannie Hillsmith. ©ShaunArmstrong/mubsta.com

Bletchley Park remembers 'forgotten genius' Gordon Welchman

An exhibition has been launched at Bletchley Park to commemorate the work of Cambridge lecturer and "forgotten genius" Gordon Welchman at Britain's wartime codebreaking centre. Titled Gordon Welchman: Bletchley Park's Architect of Ultra Intelligence, the exhibition is based on the book of the same name by the great man's …

Biz that OK'd Edward Snowden for security clearance is fined $30m for obvious reasons

The US Department of Justice (DoJ) will pocket $30m (£19.14m) from the company tasked with screening, among others, whistleblower Edward Snowden. The DoJ announced on Wednesday that US Investigations Services (USIS) will give up a $30m (£19.14m) payment in exchange for settling charges that it violated the US False Claims Act …
Shaun Nichols, 20 Aug 2015
Dolphins can remember each other's signature whistles after 20 years

Camera-carrying DOLPHIN SPY caught off Gaza

Palestinian news outlet Nadae Al Watan reports that a spy dolphin was captured in the Mediterranean Sea off Gaza. The publication says the creature was carrying a cameras and other surveillance equipment. It's alleged the Dolphin is a weaponised aquatic mammal used by Israel to observe Palestinian Islamic resistance movement …
Simon Sharwood, 20 Aug 2015
F-16 falcon fighter jet

US Air Force: 'Loose tweets destroy fleets'

Pic The US Air Force has warned its personnel to keep quiet of their activities on Twitter – or as they put it: "Loose tweets destroy fleets." The notice reminds everyone that terrorist organizations and sympathizers will exploit any military information posted on social networks and other websites. The warning extends not only …
Shaun Nichols, 17 Aug 2015

Doubts cast on Islamic State's so-called leak of US .mil, .gov passwords

Updated Islamic State's frothing fanatics have leaked online what they claim to be the email addresses and plaintext passwords of 1,500 American military personnel – including CIA staff. The details include full names, email addresses, unencrypted passwords, ZIP codes, places of work, and telephone numbers. They come in a format that …
Kieren McCarthy, 12 Aug 2015

Microsoft co-founder recovers ship's bell of 'The Mighty Hood'

A team led by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen has recovered the ship's bell of battlecruiser HMS Hood – the pride of the Royal Navy, which, on 24 May 1941, was sent to the bottom of the North Atlantic by the German battleship Bismark, with the loss of 1,415 lives. Video still showing the recovery of the bell of HMS Hood An …
Lester Haines, 10 Aug 2015
ShutterStock217132183

ATTACK of the ZOMBIE SATELLITE: Run radio hams, run!

A satellite launched by the US military has gone rogue and is causing interference to radio hams across Europe. The US Navy’s PCSat NO-44, which is only supposed to transmit over the US, is now drowning out European amateurs and the USN doesn’t know what to do about it. Former head of information security at BT and keen radio …
Adam Banks, 31 Jul 2015
Credit: Oren Schauble Licence: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Small number of computer-aided rifles could be hacked in contrived scenario

The internet is reeling today at the "news" that a rare make of computer-aided gunsight can under certain circumstances be hacked into, permitting a hacker to interfere with a suitably-equipped rifle's aim. The gunsight in question is the much-hyped but seldom purchased TrackingPoint kit, a system with a Linux machine at its …
Lewis Page, 30 Jul 2015
Credit: RodWey2004 Licence: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en

Hawking, Musk, Woz (and Riley): ROBOTS will KILL US ALL

+Comment Notables of the technology world including physicist Stephen Hawking, biz baron Elon Musk and techno-hippy Steve Wozniak have teamed up with saucy actress minx Talulah Riley to warn us all about the menace of killer robots. In an open letter and petition, the distinguished trio and their co-signatories warn: Autonomous …
Lewis Page, 27 Jul 2015
Engineer aboard Das Boot U-96 responds to telegraphs

Rise of the swimming machines: US sub launches and recovers a drone

The US Navy has successfully launched and returned an underwater drone during an undersea mission in the Mediterranean. Virginia-class attack submarine the USS North Dakota (SSN-784), was deployed to the Mediterranean for two months. She returned to base on Monday after a successful test of her drone-launching capability, …
900cc Fiat 500 should be called the Fiat 900

2015 Fiat 500 fashionista, complete with facelift

VULTURE AT THE WHEEL It’s all about the engines. Fiat has added new Euro 6 compliant engines to its line-up and this is the excuse the company has employed to call the facelifted 500 “new”. It gets a bit of a nip and tuck in the form of a nose job. Lights slanted back a bit and LED running lights. Mani beam is still halogen or optionally Xenon, …
Simon Rockman, 18 Jul 2015

Happy NukeDay to you! 70 years in the shadow of the bomb post-Trinity

Pics and vid At 5:30am on July 16, 1945, American and British scientists watched the detonation of the world's first nuclear weapon and mankind entered the atomic age. Youtube Video The Trinity test was the high point of the Manhattan Project, the Allied powers' plan to develop an atomic bomb before the Germans or Japanese managed it. The …
Iain Thomson, 17 Jul 2015
Ripley (Sigourney Weaver)

NASA chooses ace SPACE PILOTS who'll take the USA back into manned flight

NASA has chosen the astronauts who will be first in the upcoming return by America to manned space operations. All four are veteran space fliers and former military test pilots. "For as long as I’ve been Administrator, President Obama has made it very clear that returning the launches of American astronauts to American soil is …
Iain Thomson, 09 Jul 2015
Ship scrapyard photo via Shutterstock

Why the USS NetApp is a doomed ship

Comment NetApp last month changed chief executives, and in May laid off just over 500 people. Some believe this is the start of great new things and a turnaround for NetApp. I disagree. To put this as bluntly as I can, NetApp is most likely doomed. Getting rid of the CEO won't save it. NetApp's problem is that the culture of: "The …
Trevor Pott, 09 Jul 2015