Articles about Mlc

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Anobit flash can take a pounding for 5 years

EMC World Israeli startup Anobit has introduced a Genesis SSD which lasts for five years when writing 4TB of data a day. Anobit uses memory signal processing (MSP) technology, based on digital signal processing technology to extract usable signals from multi-level cell (MLC) flash cells that other controllers would consider worn out and …
Chris Mellor, 11 May 2011
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Intel leaks show a flashy future

Here's a lovely leaked Intel SSD roadmap – thank you engadget – showing six 25nm products coming plus two more 34nm single-level cell speedsters by the end of the year. Intel's SSD range is moving from 34nm process geometry to 25nm geometry. The previous X25 and X18 branding has changed to 300, 500 and 700 brands and the most …
Chris Mellor, 3 May 2011
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Intel re-invents its mainstream SSD

Intel has announced a 510 solid state drive (SSD) line that greatly increases the read/write bandwidth, but has lower IOPS numbers compared to its existing X25-M SSD products. The X25-M is a 2.5-inch form factor SSD using 2-bit multi-level cell (MLC) flash. There is a 1.8-inch form factor version as well as a lower cost and …
Chris Mellor, 4 Mar 2011
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IBM in dash for multi-level flash

STEC's 2-bit ZeusIOPS MLC (multi-level cell) flash will be supplied for the high-end DS8800, DS8700 Turbo, and Storwize V7000 storage, but not for IBM's DS5000 arrays. Maybe this s a "not yet" rather than a "not ever", as the DS5000 range does support SSD (solid state drive) use. STEC says that IBM chose it partly because of …
Chris Mellor, 17 Dec 2010

'Wear levelling' - a bedroom aid for multi-layer cell Flash

Comment Multi-level cell NAND flash doesn't last as long as single-level cell flash but there are ways to increase its life, under the generic heading of wear-levelling. NAND flash cells have a finite life, in that they only support a specific number of writes before failing to return valid data from a read request. It's necessary to …
Chris Mellor, 13 Dec 2010
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Self-correcting memory arrives at last

Micron is putting error correction code (ECC) in its NAND chips to combat increased error rates as NAND process sizes shrink. The company says that as NAND process sizes decrease to 20nm and then become even smaller, the bit error rates will rise, requiring NAND controllers in mobile phones and other flash-using devices to …
Chris Mellor, 2 Dec 2010
hands waving dollar bills in the air

Viking Modular busts SAS SSD price premium

Comment Viking Modular wants to sell a heck of a lot more SAS interface solid state drives (SSD) by cutting what it says is the artificially high price premium they enjoy over SATA SSDs. The company, a division of Sanmina-SCI, announced a pair of SAS interface solid state drives (SSDs) a week or so ago and the performance numbers have …
Chris Mellor, 28 Sep 2010
homeless man with sign

SanDisk bigs up its flash postage stamp

SanDisk has announced a postage stamp-sized flash iSSD product for tablet computers at the Flash Memory Summit, with capacity ranging from 4GB to 64GB. IDC has conveniently defined a new flash product category, embedded flash, for what are called "highly portable consumer electronics devices", presumably meaning anything from …
Chris Mellor, 20 Aug 2010
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Samsung gears up to make half-terabyte flash drives

Samsung is close to volume production of half-terabyte PC/notebook solid state drives (SSD) with impressively fast read and write speeds. The product, which doubles the 256GB capacity of the previous Samsung client SSD and will ship a year after it, should be mass-produced next month. Samsung says it uses "state of the art" …
Chris Mellor, 17 Jun 2010
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SanDisk soups up SSD storage to 256GB

SanDisk has doubled the capacity of its solid state drive (SSD) with a G4 model lifting it to 256GB. The previous G3 model offered 60 and 120GB with a 220MB/sec read speed and 120MB/sec write speed, and an endurance of 80TB written. Its shiny new G4 offers sequential read/write speeds of up to 220 and 160MB/sec and a 160TB …
Chris Mellor, 1 Jun 2010
vulture tv reporter

Plextor plunges into SSD pool

Japanese-owned Plextor, a significant player in the optical drive business, is entering the solid state disk (SSD) market, riding on the back of Philips Lite-On Digital Solutions (PLDS). Plextor is privately owned by Shimano Kenshi of Japan. PLDS is a joint-venture and is licensed to sell Plextor kit in North America. PLDS …
Chris Mellor, 19 Jan 2010
homeless man with sign

Samsung soups up flash capacity

Samsung has souped up its flash capacity with a 64GB MoviNAND product and a 32GB microSD (Secure Digital) product. MoviNAND is an embedded NAND flash product with an MMC interface, flash memory and controller in a BGA package. The 64GB moviNAND measures 1.4mm in height and is built from 16 32nm, 32Gbit, 2-bit multi-level cell …
Chris Mellor, 14 Jan 2010
globalisation

Micron lights touchpaper on flash rocket

Micron has announced what looks like a blazingly fast multi-level cell solid state drive (SSD), which supports the 6Gbit/s SATA interface. The RealSSD C300 is built using the 34nm process Micron and Intel have developed. It comes in both 1.8-inch and 2.5-inch form factors and has 128GB and 256GB capacity points. The read speed …
Chris Mellor, 3 Dec 2009
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SandForce gets another $21m funding

Solid state drive (SSD) controller start-up SandForce has landed $21m of C-round funding, just eight months after a $20m-plus B-round. Why does a fabless silicon startup need that much cash? SandForce is developing SoC (System on Chip) products that, it says: "boost the storage I/O performance of next generation servers, …
Chris Mellor, 11 Nov 2009
globalisation

Micron's new flash dies live longer

Micron is sampling new flash dies that can write data many more times than other flash chips before they expire. Micron calls its new products Enterprise NAND and is using a 34nm process to build them. It has a new 16Gbit single-level cell (SLC) die capable of up to 300,000 write cycles. Micron says this is three times more …
Chris Mellor, 19 Oct 2009
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SanDisk flashes its extra bits

SanDisk is shipping 4-bit Secure Digital flash cards with flash chips storing 8GB of data. Multi-level cell (MLC) flash technology stores four bits of data per cell. MLC is regarded as key technology for increasing NAND flash capacity and effectively lowering its cost per GB stored, making it more affordable. Alternatively …
Chris Mellor, 13 Oct 2009
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SSD flag bearer to quickly hit $2bn valuation

The solid-state drive streets are paved with gold for STEC, which is about to vault to a $2bn market capitalization. The company's share price is hovering at a whisker below $40, and its present market capitalisation is $1.98bn. The stock appreciation has been fantastic: at the start of this year shares were a mere $4.67. The …
Chris Mellor, 25 Aug 2009
Samsung

Samsung gets 'stupid fast' in gaming grab

Samsung is pitching its fast 256GB solid state drive (SSD) at desktops and notebook gamers and cites a YouTube blogger saying it will make their systems "stupid fast." The drive uses 2-bit multi-level cell technology to produce its 256GB capacity and this is twinned with a Samsung-developed controller using an ARM processor …
Chris Mellor, 17 Aug 2009

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