Articles about Memory

Mark Zuckerberg photo by Bangkokhappiness via Shutterstock

Mark Zuckerberg and the $3bn cash fling: He's not your father's tech kingpin

Lou Gerstner, Ray Noorda, Lew Platt. Remember them? Ever even heard of them? Anybody with a memory or knowledge of the tech industry will know them as former, if anonymous, leaders of IBM, Novell and Hewlett-Packard. Newbies and the average person outside tech won’t without a quick Google. I recently visited the London …
Gavin Clarke, 27 Sep 2016

The server's down. At 3AM. On Christmas. You're drunk. So you put a disk in the freezer

On-Call The On-Call inbox is full to overflowing, so we felt like letting another reader's tale of late-night weirdness into the wild. In this tale, reader “Nic” told us that “Back in the 1990s when being a web designer was a job and ISDN was considered hot stuff I worked as a sysadmin at an outfit strategically located above a guitar …
Simon Sharwood, 27 Sep 2016

NetApp is hyped about its under-wraps hyper-converged system

Albeit late to market, NetApp is developing a hyper-converged infrastructure product, The Register has learned. We're told that NetApp will sell this new gear to ensure the company is not late to the next big inflection point in the storage market: storage-class memory (SCM). Speaking to El Reg from NetApp’s Insight event in …
Chris Mellor, 26 Sep 2016
Destry_rides_again_DO_NOT_USE

Violin hunts for elusive key to regrowth

Analysis The elusive hunt for renewal and regrowth at Violin Memory has moved into a new phase – with a product launch holding up sales, sales leadership change, and the CEO focusing on finding funding for the future. Violin has cleverly managed to avoid falling off a cliff despite falling sales revenues and investor despair. It …
Chris Mellor, 26 Sep 2016

NetApp facelift: FAS hardware refresh and a little nip ONTAP

NetApp has comprehensively refreshed its all-flash FAS and hybrid FAS arrays, adding performance, capacity and scalability upgrades, and supporting 32Gbit/s Fibre Channel and 40GbitE connectivity. ONTAP also gets upgraded, with Azure support for ONTAP Cloud This follows on from the E-Series launch of the entry-level all-flash …
Chris Mellor, 26 Sep 2016
Cambridge bikes photo MK Jones via Shutterstock

Turing, Hauser, Sinclair – haunt computing's Cambridge A-team stamping ground

Geek's Guide to Britain King’s Parade in Cambridge looks like the last street on earth to have anything to do with computing. On one side is an absurdly ornate college gatehouse in yellow stone and King’s College Chapel, which combines the barn-like shape of a tiny chapel with the scale and detail of a cathedral. The other side is lined by tall …
SA Mathieson, 26 Sep 2016

Double KO! Capcom's Street Fighter V installs hidden rootkit on PCs

A fresh update for Capcom's Street Fighter V for PCs includes a knock-out move: a secret rootkit that gives any installed application kernel-level privileges. This means any malicious software on the system can poke a dodgy driver installed by SFV to completely take over the Windows machine. Capcom claims it uses the driver to …
Chris Williams, 23 Sep 2016

Do AI chat bots need a personality bypass – or will we only trust gabber 'droids with character?

Machine communication is an area generating much excitement in AI. The ability to give machines a voice and personality has been the subject of many sci-fi films, and the push in natural language processing has brought that idea closer to reality. All the big AI players are investing in some sort of chatbot. Google just …
Katyanna Quach, 23 Sep 2016
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OpenSSL swats a dozen bugs, one notable nasty

A dozen flaws have been patched in OpenSSL, including one high severity hole that allows denial of service attacks. The OpenSSL Project pushed patches in versions 1.1.0a, 1.0.2i and 1.0.1u, with most of the flaws flagged as low severity risks. The nastiest vulnerability (CVE-2016-6304) results when attackers issue a massive …
Team Register, 23 Sep 2016

Intel XPoint over-selling criticism surges as Chipzilla hits back

You might have noticed that El Reg has suggested Intel and Micron’s non-volatile XPoint memory claims are a tad overblown – for example here and here. Now Charlie Demerjian is giving Intel a good kicking in SemiAccurate, alleging the original claims were inaccurate and that “Intel’s Xpoint is pretty much broken”. For example, …
Chris Mellor, 22 Sep 2016

Seventeen hopefuls fight for the NVMe Fabric array crown

Comment A new phase of disruption is hitting the performance data storage array market, giving new, old, startup and struggling all-flash array vendors a shot at making it big by using NVMe flash drives and NVMe Fabric-class connectivity to provide direct-attached SSD performance from external arrays. The charge is being led by Dell- …
Chris Mellor, 22 Sep 2016

Objects! Aaah-ah ... the savior of software-defined storage?

Comment Software-defined storage (SDS) is one of those terms that has been readily hijacked by vendors over the past few years. The term developed from the adoption of software-defined networking (SDN), used to define the separation of control and data traffic in the networking world, which provides the abstraction needed to deliver …
Chris Evans, 22 Sep 2016
Joey from the sitcom friends pokes his head around the door (invasively). Photo copyright NBC

Cisco snaps shut remote pwnage hole in Cloud Services Platform

Cisco has provided a patch to address a remote hijacking vulnerability in its Cloud Services Platform (CSP). Switchzilla said that all customers who run CSP 2100 software should install the 2.1.0 update to close a remote code execution flaw it considers to be a high security risk. Designed as an efficient way to manage …
Shaun Nichols, 21 Sep 2016
Array in a rack. Image via Shutterstock

Rackspace punts piscatorial Power platform at service providers

Freshly acquired hosting slinger Rackspace has built a custom-developed server based on IBM’s Power chips and the Open Compute Project (OCP) specifications. The company hopes to flog it to service providers and enterprise customers looking for an alternative to x86 systems for high performance computing. Known as Barreleye …
Dan Robinson, 21 Sep 2016
still of Ian McKellan as magneto in the x-men movie

Magneto-resistant upstart Everspin gets itself into an IPO whizz

MRAM startup Everspin has filed for an IPO. Everspin_ST-MRAM_die Everspin MRAM die Magneto-resistive or Magnetic Random-Access Memory (MRAM) is non-volatile RAM that’s faster than NAND; think of it roughly as XPoint-class stuff. It’s been used by server and system vendors for niche needs requiring very fast and non- …
Chris Mellor, 21 Sep 2016

Cisco re-commits to VCE with a very public display of affection

Dell EMC CEO Michael Dell and Cisco CEO Chuck Robbins have indulged in a very public display of affection for each other, at least so far as the two companies' collaboration in the VCE converged infrastructure company is concerned. The Robbins-and-Dell-the-man video is full of scripted corp-speak, but the message is clear: …
Simon Sharwood, 21 Sep 2016
Satoru Iwata

Legend of Zelda cracked with 6502 assembly language glitch

A 30-year-old bug in the iconic Nintendo game Legend of Zelda allows players to finish the game in minutes. A video posted to YouTube shows that, beneath what looks to be a fun game glitch, there is a fascinating bit of code manipulation in 6502 Assembly: Youtube Video While executing the procedure requires a tediously …
Shaun Nichols, 20 Sep 2016
RAF Tornado GR.4 flying down the Mach Loop in Wales

Radar missile decoys will draw enemy missiles away from RAF jets

Britain's Tornado fighter jets may soon be deploying with missile-jamming decoys on board after the MoD signed a £2.5m order with Leonardo-Finmeccanica. The BriteCloud decoys are about the size of a can of Coke and can be fired from the jets' flare dispensers. The electronic gizmo uses “powerful radar emissions” to draw enemy …
Gareth Corfield, 19 Sep 2016

EMC: King of storage needs to shore up defences

IDC’s latest storage tracker says the enterprise storage market was flat in the 12 months since 2015’s second quarter, but HPE now ties with EMC for first place, with IBM and NetApp in equal fourth place after Dell. EMC (18.1 per cent) lost -5.5 per cent points of revenue share in the year, HPE (17.6 per cent) gained 8.8 per …
Chris Mellor, 19 Sep 2016

FBI overpaid $999,900 to crack San Bernardino iPhone 5c password

University of Cambridge senior research associate Sergei Skorobogatov has laid waste to United States Federal Bureau of Intelligence (FBI) assertions about iPhone security by demonstrating password bypassing using a $100 NAND mirroring rig. FBI director James Comey made the claim during the agency's bid to defeat the password …
Team Register, 19 Sep 2016
NSA

Cisco plugs another 'Shadow Brokers' hole

Cisco's post-Shadow Brokers security review has uncovered an IKEv1 vulnerability that can leak memory contents of its (deprecated) PIX firewalls and various IOS environments. Don't delay the patch, because the investigation found the bug was exploited in “some Cisco customers”. It attributes the bug to “insufficient condition …

iPhone 7's Qualcomm, Intel soap opera dumps a carrier lock-out on us

Analysis Love rat Apple two-times its long-suffering squeeze Qualcomm with dishy Intel – and it's going to keep the baby but only let some of us see it. Over a cheap bottle of chardonnay one dark night in Cupertino, Intel wooed Apple with flimsy promises. The pair felt a connection (around the 1.9GHz mark) after the iPhone maker opened …
Chris Williams, 18 Sep 2016
PRIVATE investigator on the phone, smoking a cigar, looks around suspiciously. Photo by Shutterstock

BOFH: The case of the suspicious red icon

Episode 11 So I'm in the office by myself while the PFY is out doing... something... I guess... when one of our atypical difficult users comes in. "Just one question," he starts, interrupting the thought I started when he walked in on potential loopholes in the gun laws. "My browser has an icon which is red." "What's the icon?" I ask …
Simon Travaglia, 16 Sep 2016
Milk_splash

Pass the 'Milk' to make code run four times faster, say MIT boffins

MIT boffins have created a new programming language called “Milk” that they say runs code four times faster than rivals. Professor Saman Amarasinghe says the language's secret is that changes the way cores collect and cache data. Today, he says, cores will fetch whole blocks of data from memory. That's not efficient when …
Simon Sharwood, 15 Sep 2016

UK Science Museum will reconsider its 'sexist' brain quiz

The Science Museum in London has announced it will reconsider its exhibition on sex and gender – after it faced criticism over a quiz that tested whether a brain was male or female. Located on the first floor, Who Am I? is a permanent gallery that has been in the museum over 15 years. The exhibition explores the underlying …
Katyanna Quach, 14 Sep 2016
Quick fix - worker running while carrying a wrench

VMware Workstation's installer loads danger-junk, so patch it ASAP

Late last week VMware delayed the release of Workstation 12.5 because of a bug it felt needed squashing before the code went live. It turns out the desktop hypervisor doesn't have one: it has three. And all nasty. Two derive from a dud installer. The first means “some DLL files [are] loaded by the application improperly.” “ …
Simon Sharwood, 14 Sep 2016

Using a thing made by Microsoft, Apple or Adobe? It probably needs a patch today

Mega Patch Tuesday Microsoft is wrapping up the summer with a dump of 14 bulletins for various security vulnerabilities in its products, while Apple and Adobe are following up with fixes of their own. The September edition of Patch Update Tuesday sees fixes released for critical issues in Windows, Windows Server, Internet Explorer, Edge, Flash …
Shaun Nichols, 13 Sep 2016

Bug of the month: Cache flow problem crashes Samsung phone apps

It's not been a good summer for Samsung. It packed its Galaxy Note 7 smartphones with detonating batteries, sparking a global recall. And its whizzy Exynos 8890 processor, which powers the Note 7 and the Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge, is tripping up apps with seemingly bizarre crashes – from null pointers to illegal instruction …
Chris Williams, 13 Sep 2016

Nvidia: Eight bits ought to be enough for anybody ... doing AI

Analysis Nvidia has designed a couple of new Tesla processors for AI applications – the P4 and the P40 – and is talking up their 8-bit math performance. The 16nm FinFET GPUs use Nv's Pascal architecture and follow on from the P100 launched in June. The P4 fits on a half-height, half-length PCIe card for scale-out servers, while the …
Chris Williams, 13 Sep 2016
Image by TSHIRT-FACTORYdotCOM http://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-110716p1.html

Infected Android phones could flood America's 911 with DDoS attacks

A research trio has shown how thousands of malware-infected phones could launch automated distributed denial of service attacks to cripple the US emergency phone system "for days". The attacks are a new area of research and exploit the need for emergency call services to accept all calls regardless of origin. The theoretical …
Darren Pauli, 13 Sep 2016
Hololens

Hololens for biz shocker: Surprisingly, it doesn't totally suck

Review At $3,000 Microsoft’s Hololens isn’t going to be in too many gamers’ Christmas stockings this year, being more of a chance for corporates to work out the business case for augmented reality. I did manage to get my hands on, and head in, a Hololens set. I did so thanks to Kazendi who – for £17,500 – can knock out a fixed-price …
Dominic Connor, 12 Sep 2016
Cthulu emerges from a printer. Image created by illustrator Andy Davies. Copyright: The Register

Is there paper in the printer? Yes and it's so neatly wrapped!

On-Call Look at the clock: Friday is here and so, therefore, is On-Call, El Reg's weekly wander down memory lane and into readers' recollections of jobs gone awry. This week, we're going to be like one of those Simpsons in which the family visits another nation. But with a better plot and without lazy stereotyping, thanks to reader “ …
Simon Sharwood, 09 Sep 2016

Hypervisor security ero-Xen: How guest VMs can hijack host servers

Analysis The Xen project has today patched four security bugs in its open-source hypervisor – three potentially allowing guest virtual machines to take over their host servers. The other programming cockup allows a guest to crash the underlying machine. This is not great news for cloud providers or anyone else running untrusted VMs on …
Chris Williams, 08 Sep 2016
empty_box

IBM lifts lid, unleashes Linux-based x86 killer on unsuspecting world

HPC Blog IBM is mounting its strongest challenge yet to x86 hegemony with the unveiling of its spanking new Linux based S822LC system. What makes this system different is that it’s based on a new processor/motherboard configuration, complete with a sporty NVIDIA NVLink connector. According to my research, close to half of you HPC users …
Star Trek bridge crew VR Ubisoft screen shot

Hello, Star Trek? 25th Century here: It's time to move on

Star Trek @ 50 Visiting the new Star Trek Exhibition in Blackpool recently I was reminded of my soft spot for quark – no, not the elementary particle or the curdled dairy treat but that ugly little alien who runs a strip bar in Deep Space Nine. I say “reminded” because things have changed considerably for the franchise since the Federation …
Lucy Orr, 08 Sep 2016
ScaleIO_Node_bezel

EMC/Dell deal respectfully caps the minicomputer age

Over the years I've followed EMC, executives have told me that cloudfather Joe Tucci would sometimes gaze out of his office window at the company's Hopkinton headquarters and ponder the company's place as the last surviving Massachusetts technology giant. The story goes that from Tucci's office he could see buildings once …
Simon Sharwood, 07 Sep 2016
Photo by drserg / Shutterstock

Fujitsu's billion-dollar ARM supercomputer delayed by up to 2 years

Fujitsu's monster ARM-powered supercomputer, the Post-K, will miss its 2020 deadline. The $910m project has stalled because its engineers need more time to design, test and perfect the machine's processors, we can confirm. Fujitsu was hired by Japan's boffinry nerve-center RIKEN to produce a roughly 1,000 peta-FLOPS …
Chris Williams, 07 Sep 2016
Xeon E3-1500 v5

Hardcore core-to-core comms core-alled into hardware

Intel and boffins at the North Carolina State University have cooked up a framework that coordinates core-to-core communications in hardware rather than software. This work is important because to keep processing power scaling up, you want the overhead of multi-core computing processes to stay down. The CAF – core-to-core …
Android Nougat

Google emits three sets of Android patches to fend off evil texts, files

It's a smaller-than-usual Android patch bundle from Google – just 47 patches for 57 flaws. These software bugs can be exploited by installed apps or malicious code smuggled in multimedia messages and files to gain total control of vulnerable phones, tablets, internet-connected fridges and other Android gadgets – allowing …
Iain Thomson, 06 Sep 2016

Google swats Nexus 5X vulnerable fastboot memory dump flaw

Google has patched a bypass hole in Nexus 5X devices that allowed attackers to dump memory from locked phones. IBM X-Force research lead Roee Hay says exploiting the flaw was simple and required a device be put into fastboot mode. "The vulnerability would have permitted an attacker to obtain a full memory dump of the Nexus 5X …
Darren Pauli, 04 Sep 2016
HBO: Game of Thrones

Behold this golden era of storage startups. It's coming to an end

Comment We are living in one of the most fascinating storage times with a great and rewarding war of storage access latency, but the major gains have already been won – and the scope for future advances is narrowing. A previous storage revolution concerned space reclamation with deduplication, compression and thin provisioning …
Chris Mellor, 02 Sep 2016
 French bulldog puppy wears plastic devil horns and cute expression. Photo by Shutterstock

OpenBSD 6.0 lands

OpenBSD developers might be keen on the 1980s in their artwork, but not in their operating system: Version 6.0 has just landed, and the maintainers have killed off VAX support. Apart from a logo that pays homage to the cover art for the iconic album The Wall, there's a fair amount of new stuff landing in OpenBSD 6.0. W^X – …

Patch now: Apple emits fix for Pegasus spyware bugs in OS X, Safari

Those vulnerabilities last week that let government snoops monitor iPhones, iPads and iPods? Turns out they're present in desktop Safari and OS X, too – and Apple has quietly pushed out patches for them. This isn't a big surprise because iOS and OS X, and mobile and desktop Safari, share big chunks of code, so flaws in Apple …
Netflix logo with Kevin Spacey, or is that other way around?

What do microservices do to data stores? Netflix is built on them and had no idea!

Microservices are the new black for developers, but even one of their world's biggest and most prominent users – Netflix – has said they're a bugger to manage. “As Netflix runs thousands of microservices, we are not always aware of the traffic that bundled microservices may generate on our backend systems,” write the company's …
Simon Sharwood, 01 Sep 2016

Phytium's 64-core ARM chip

Our sister site The Next Platform has just published loads of interesting details on 64-bit ARMv8-compatible desktop, laptop and server processors designed by Chinese upstart Phytium. The first engineering samples for three 28nm CPUs – the Earth architecture FT-1500A/4 and the FT-1500A/16 and the Mars architecture FT-2000/64 …
Chris Williams, 01 Sep 2016

Crashing PC sales don't stop HP Inc releasing two new ones

HP Inc has announced two new PC desktops: the miniscule and modular Elite Slice, as well as the new Toblerone of IT, Pavilion Wave, as a domestic entertainment machine. Elite Slice is HP’s smallest desktop. A 6.5" square, it stands only 1.38 inches tall, at least before you add the stackable modules, and is cooled by a 360- …
Little girl embraces robot. Photo by Shutterstock

Huawei hugs open-sourcey Alluxio: Thanks for the memories

Huawei has announced a Big Data analytics acceleration scheme using its FusionStorage product and Alluxio open source software; which seems to be the canine genitalia du jour for speeding up lethargic analytics queries. Alluxio is the renamed Tachyon Nexus, an Andreessen Horowitz-backed startup. FusionStorage is Huawei's …
Chris Mellor, 01 Sep 2016
VMworld 2016

VMware's vDare: Build more complexity and silos, or virtualize more

VMworld VMware opened its VMworld 2016 conference asking its customers to “Be tomorrow,” a couplet that was introduced at the event's opening keynote with a performance of poetry that felt like the work of a slick self-help spruiker. But VMware might just be onto something here, because it knows that in not many tomorrows, serious …
Simon Sharwood, 31 Aug 2016
Nantero_CNT_tube

Deep inside Nantero's non-volatile carbon nanotube RAM tech

Two Fujitsu semiconductor businesses are licensing Nantero NRAM technology with joint Nantero-Fujitsu development to produce chips in 2018. They will have several thousand times faster rewrites and many thousands of times more rewrite cycles than embedded flash memory. NRAM, non-volatile RAM, is based on carbon nanotube (CNT) …
Chris Mellor, 31 Aug 2016
Grid Compass production version

John Ellenby, British inventor of the first laptop, powers off

Obituary The creator of the world's first laptop, the GRiD Compass, has died at the age of 75 at his home in California. John Ellenby was born in the North of England in 1941 and educated at University College London, where he showed an early interest in computers. After a career designing mainframes he moved to the US, where he ended …
Iain Thomson, 30 Aug 2016