Articles about Ip

Borg and Picard

Resistence is futile: HPE must face Oracle over Solaris IP

Hewlett-Packard Enterprise and Oracle are heading back to court – this time over an alleged violation of IP rights on Solaris. A US judge has thrown out a motion by HPE to have Oracle's Solaris violation claim against it dismissed. Oracle had accused HPE, case 3:16-cv-01393-JST, of improperly partnering with Terix Computer to …
Gavin Clarke, 23 Jan 2017
Bitcoin, photo via Shutterstock

SporeStack: Disposable, anonymous servers, via Bitcoin and Python

Hardware infrastructure, once the foundation of computing giants like IBM, has become an abstract commodity thanks to cloud computing, virtualization, and containerization. Through large service providers like Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform, or smaller ones like DigitalOcean, Linode, and Vultr …
Thomas Claburn, 19 Jan 2017
Made in China

IBM, Microsoft, US Govt all to blame for globalisation backlash: Jack Ma

Silicon Valley’s tech plutocrats have kept a relatively low profile at Davos, the WEF’s schmoozefest for corporate, government and NGO elites. But into the void stepped Jack Ma, founder of Alibaba. Alibaba is the gigantic, tat bazaar that has eclipsed the company it copied: eBay. Ma used to encourage new hires to perform …
Andrew Orlowski, 19 Jan 2017
id4_white_house_648

Trump inauguration DDoS protest is 'illegal', warn securobods

A software engineer is calling on netizens opposed to Donald Trump to visit the Whitehouse.gov site and overload it with traffic tomorrow. The call to mark inauguration day by "occupying" whitehouse.gov as a form of protest against Donald Trump’s presidency is likely to succeed only in getting participants into trouble, …
John Leyden, 19 Jan 2017

ProtonMail launches Tor hidden service to dodge totalitarian censorship

ProtonMail, the privacy-focused email business, has launched a Tor hidden service to combat the censorship and surveillance of its users. The move is designed to counter actions "by totalitarian governments around the world to cut off access to privacy tools" and the Swiss company specifically cited "recent events such as the …
Hadoop

Insecure Hadoop installs next in 'net scum crosshairs

Rinse-and-repeat ransomware attacks on data services left unsecured by dozy sysadmins are now hitting Hadoop instances. Fidelis Cybersecurity reckons it's started observing the attacks, which seek out default installations of the big data darling, copy and then wipe Hadoop instances and then demand a ransom for return of …
Fibre, image via Shutterstock

100 Gbps link to Europe lights up to delight researchers

Researchers are getting another 100 Gbps of dedicated connectivity between America and Europe, courtesy of a link on the AEConnect cable activated by Indiana University. Paid for by a National Science Foundation NEEAR (Networks for European, American and African Research) grant, the link connects the US to Ireland. The pan- …
Halo 5: Guardians - Microsoft XBOX ONE

DataGravity moves away from arrays to become a virtualised data guardian

Analysis Startup DataGravity laid off staff in February last year and subsequently pivoted away from building and selling its Discovery Series array line to building a shipping virtual appliance using its Discovery Series array software as a basis. DataGravity for Virtualisation (DGfV) runs as a virtual machine and operates in vSphere …
Chris Mellor, 16 Jan 2017
AI

Sysadmin chatbots: We have the technology

Storage Blockhead Chatbots are flashing up in our future view as something that could improve an admin's lot. Instead of using a GUI with nested and drill-down screen forms to do their job, they'll have a new form of Command Line Interface, only this will be a Chat Line Interface to a chatbot. Array vendor Tintri is showing how this could be …
Chris Mellor, 16 Jan 2017
prison

Playpen child sex abuse archive admin gets 20 years in the Big House

An administrator of Playpen – the notorious dark-web trading post of child sex abuse material – has been jailed for 20 years and faces a lifetime of parole. Michael Fluckiger, 46, of Portland, Indiana, was arrested on March 4, 2015 and pled guilty to helping run the Playpen website, which was taken over by the FBI and used to …
Iain Thomson, 13 Jan 2017
Duck Hunt. Credit: Nintendo.

MongoDB hackers now sacking ElasticSearch

It is open season on open services as net scum migrate from sacking MongoDB databases to insecure ElasticSearch instances. Some 35,000 mostly Amazon Web Services ElasticSearch servers are open to the internet and to ransoming criminals, Shodan boss John Matherly says. So far more than 360 instances have had data copied and …
Darren Pauli, 13 Jan 2017
Trump, photo by uplift the world via Shutterstock

Trump's cyber-guru Giuliani runs ancient 'easily hackable website'

US president-elect Donald Trump's freshly minted cyber-tsar Rudy Giuliani runs a website with a content management system years out of date and potentially utterly hackable. Former New York City mayor and Donald loyalist Giuliani was today unveiled by Trump's transition team as the future president's cybersecurity adviser – …
Darren Pauli, 13 Jan 2017
Cookie Monster

EU tosses Europe's cookies... popups

The EU’s most famous contribution to the internet era could be snuffed out soon, and few will mourn it. As expected, Brussels will no longer mandate that websites receive the user’s consent for placing cookies on their device. Scrapping the consent form is one of the options floated in the European Commission new public …
Andrew Orlowski, 10 Jan 2017
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Two years on, thousands of unpatched Magento shops still being carded

More than 6,000 online stores running eBay's Magento platform have been hacked with credit cards stolen under a campaign that could span almost two years, Germany's Federal Office for Information Security says. Attackers are injecting carding malware on unpatched Magento shops, which steals payment information during …
Darren Pauli, 10 Jan 2017

IBM filed another 8,000 patents in 2016

IBM’s lawyers were busy little bees last year, getting a shade more than 8,000 patent applications granted for Big Blue’s American brainboxes. IBM claims its inventors were granted an average of 22 patents per day in 2016, scoring a total of 8,088 patents. Of those patents, 2,700 were related to AI, cognitive computing and …
Gareth Corfield, 09 Jan 2017
Flying pig

NSW government drops a Catch: Bus Wi-Fi is a privacy nightmare

Privacy activists and the NSW Greens in Australia have come out against the NSW State Government's umpteenth Wi-Fi-on-buses trial. The reason: instead of trying to offer the Wi-Fi itself, as has happened in past attempted-but-abandoned rollouts, the Baird government is letting a company called Catch run the hotspots. Catch is …

MongoDB ransom attacks soar, body count hits 27,000 in hours

MongoDB databases are being decimated in soaring ransomware attacks that have seen the number of compromised systems more than double to 27,000 in a day. Criminals are accessing, copying and deleting data from unpatched or badly-configured databases. Administrators are being charged ransoms to have data returned. Initial …
Darren Pauli, 09 Jan 2017
silence

FBI let alleged pedo walk free rather than explain how they snared him

In a surprising and worrying move, the FBI has dropped its case against a man accused of downloading child sex abuse images, rather than reveal details about how they caught him. Jay Michaud, a middle school teacher in Vancouver, Washington, was arrested in July last year after visiting the Playpen, a dark web meeting place …
Iain Thomson, 06 Jan 2017
A cute cat in a jumper waves goodbye.... Pic via Shutterstock

Yep. Bitcasa's called it quits

Analysis Cloud file storage startup Bitcasa - a firm cynics might say had an apparent death wish - has called it a day. An odd posting on its website by CEO Brian "Tap" Taptich reads: Bitcasa is no more, and this is not bad news. Thanks to the very hard work, generosity and persistence of a number of folks – from employees to …
Chris Mellor, 06 Jan 2017

D-Link sucks so much at Internet of Suckage security – US watchdog

America's trade watchdog is suing D-Link, alleging the router and camera vendor failed to implement basic security protections in its gear. The FTC said that its complaint was based on D-Link's failure to take "reasonable steps" to secure its products, putting the privacy of citizens everywhere at risk as a result. "Hackers …
Shaun Nichols, 06 Jan 2017
Spanner and bolt photo via Shutterstock

Google's big Spanner in the works for price war against AWS

The cloud wars won't be won on price – but customers are waking up to the costs, according to Google. "It's not a zero-sum game," Brian Stevens, Google's vice president for Cloud Platform and former Red Hat chief technology officer, told The Reg in a recent interview. "We don't think you just win on cost alone, but we do …
Gavin Clarke, 05 Jan 2017
Some of the Super Pressure Balloon. M. McCarthy, submitted to the ABC

2016 – the year 3D XPoint came down to earth from Planet Hype

Storage Review in 2016 Storage in 2016 saw its on-premises SAN/filer array heartland assaulted by the public cloud on the one hand, and hyper-converged and software-defined storage on the other. The now-classic dual-controller disk array went hybrid to keep storing primary data, but all-flash arrays are taking on that role and so the hybrids went …
Chris Mellor, 05 Jan 2017

Dotdot. Who's there? Yet another IoT app layer

Internet of Things bods at the Zigbee Alliance have unveiled what they are calling a “universal language” for IoT, dotdot. A rebrand and potential expansion of the group's existing application layer, Zigbee Cluster Library (ZCL), dotdot is now being touted by the alliance as the one true solution for getting different IoT …
Gareth Corfield, 04 Jan 2017
Couple in snorkelling gear at the travel agents... Comedy snap. Photo by Shutterstock

Travel booking systems ‘wide open’ to abuse – report

Updated Legacy travel booking systems disclose travellers’ private information, security researchers warn. Travel bookings worldwide are maintained in a handful of Global Distributed Systems (GDS) built around mainframe computers linked to the web but without adequate security controls, say the researchers. “The systems have since …
John Leyden, 04 Jan 2017

Russian 'grid attack' turns out to be a damp squib

Updated Russian hackers have not penetrated America's electricity grid, in spite of an end-of-year media flurry saying they did. The story was triggered because an anonymous source told the Washington Post miscreants had infiltrated the grid, when in fact – as the story was later amended to read – one Burlington Electric Department …

Top-Secret-cleared SOCOM medics hit in 11GB govt database leak

A Pentagon subcontractor has exposed the names, locations, Social Security Numbers, and salaries of US Military Special Operations Command (SOCOM) healthcare professionals. The cleartext and openly accessible database – said to be at least 11 gigabytes in size – also included names and locations of at least two Special Forces …
Darren Pauli, 03 Jan 2017
EU flag photo via Shutterstock

Did EU ruling invalidate the UK's bonkers Snoopers' Charter?

Analysis Yesterday's judgment from the EU Court of Justice offered hope to many of those critical of the wider culture of communications data retention, but what does this mean for the UK's Investigatory Powers Act? Nothing immediately, of course. The original case will now go back to the UK's Court of Appeal, from whence it initially …
Surpised man mobile phone photo by Shutterstock

Windows 10 nags, Dirty Cow, Microsoft's Linux man love: The Reg's big ones for 2016

Systems got bigger and more removed from ordinary mortals during 2016 as West Coast tech firms centralised more and more computing on server farms. Google, Facebook and Microsoft wanted us to slap on virtual reality goggles and ask artificial intelligences to serve our voice-activated commands. Cars, lorries and taxis minus …
Gavin Clarke, 22 Dec 2016

Smartphones crashed, Samsung burned: Mobile in 2016

End-of-Year Round Up The mobile landscape this year was dominated by an air war of far greater importance taking place over the players’ heads. Giant telcos went shopping for giant media companies, while Silicon Valley continued to work to destroy the value of both pipes and content, mostly by trying to queer the regulatory pitch. Down below, back …
Andrew Orlowski, 21 Dec 2016
shutterstock_annoyed_man_on_phone

Radical 5G rules proposed, but UK can address woeful coverage right now

Analysis The UK’s National Infrastructure Commission (NIC) has blasted the level of coverage achieved with 4G and urged early action to deploy 5G more effectively. The organisation’s report particularly highlighted the role small cells will play in providing good services in urban areas, and on roads and railways, where the NIC says …
Wireless Watch, 21 Dec 2016

Europe trials air-traffic-control-over-IP-and-satellite

The European Space Agency has successfully trialled its air-traffic-control-over-IP-and-satellite plan that it is hoped will one day reduce the amount of spoken instructions delivered to aircraft. Known as IRIS, the project proposes real-time “4D” tracking aircraft that will record latitude, longitude, altitude and time. Such …
Simon Sharwood, 21 Dec 2016

Kingpin in $1m global bank malware ring gets five years in chokey

A villain at the heart of an organized crime network that stole £840k ($1m) from victims' online bank accounts has been jailed. Tomasz Skowron, 29, of Meredith Road, Worthing, England, was sent down for five years and three months on Monday at Croydon Crown Court, after pleading guilty to conspiracy to defraud, fraud, and …

Evolved DNSChanger malware slings evil ads at PCs, hijacks routers

Malware that spreads via evil web ads and menaces broadband routers has been discovered – and it's going to be particularly horrible for small business and home internet users, which it targets. This latest variant of the years-old DNSChanger nasty, just spotted by Californian infosec biz Proofpoint, works like this: some …
Iain Thomson, 20 Dec 2016
Supreme Court

US Supreme Court to hear case that may ruin Lone Star patent trolls

The legal case of TC Heartland v Kraft Foods may appear to have very little to do with technology, but it could make life a lot harder for patent trolls – thanks to a US Supreme Court decision on Thursday. The case between the two was brought by Kraft over its Mio Water Enhancer, a mixture of salt and flavorings for those who …
Iain Thomson, 16 Dec 2016
fraud

'Public Wi-Fi' gang fail in cunning plan to hide £10m cigarette tax fraud

A gang of five men who met at roadside cafes and used free public Wi-Fi to try to hide their £10m cigarette smuggling ring, have been jailed for 16-and-a-half years. The men attempted to evade £10,199,650m in excise duty by smuggling large freight consignments of illegal cigarettes from Europe and China into the UK. The items …
Kat Hall, 15 Dec 2016

Arista takes a round off Cisco in long-running legal battle

Arista's taken a round from Cisco, as the two companies continue their long-running legal wrestle. This time the jurisdiction was the Northern District of California and the matter under consideration was Arista's command line interface and whether it breached a Cisco patent, or Switchzilla's copyrights on syntax or a user …
Simon Sharwood, 15 Dec 2016

Microsoft quietly emits patch to undo its earlier patch that broke Windows 10 networking

Microsoft has sneaked out a patch to get Windows 10 PCs back online after an earlier update broke networking for people's computers around the globe. Since the end of last week, systems in the UK, US, Europe and beyond have automatically installed software from Microsoft, via Windows Update, that broke DHCP. That means some …
Iain Thomson, 14 Dec 2016
Wolves

Symantec sets legal wolves upon Zscaler

Having had its patent infringement lawsuits against Veeam seen off by the US courts, Symantec has now filed an IP infringement lawsuit against cloud-based security outfit ZScaler. Symantec claims Zscaler infringes seven of its more than 2,000 US patents – numbers 6,279,113; 7,203,959; 7,246,227; 7,392,543; 7,735,116; 8,181,036 …
Chris Mellor, 13 Dec 2016

Is your Windows 10, 8 PC falling off the 'net? Microsoft doesn't care

Updated With more and more Windows 10 users losing internet and network connectivity – thanks to a dodgy software update that broke DHCP – you'd have thought Redmond would be on the ball with a cunning fix. Sadly not: the only official advice is to go away and reboot your PC. “Some customers have reported difficulties connecting to …
Iain Thomson, 13 Dec 2016
A frustrated woman

US-CERT's top tip: Hack your crap Netgear router before miscreants arrive

Owners of three models of Netgear routers are being advised to exploit a security hole in their broadband boxes to, er, temporarily close said hole. The alternative is to switch off the boxes until a firmware update lands. Netgear says that the R6400, R7000, and R8000 series routers are all vulnerable to CVE-2016-582384, a …
Shaun Nichols, 13 Dec 2016
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Botched Microsoft update knocks Windows 8, 10 PCs offline – regardless of ISP

A broken software update for Windows 8 and 10 is knackering internet connectivity for users of several ISPs in the UK, Europe and quite likely beyond. Virgin Media in Blighty is the latest provider to confirm the dodgy code is knocking a number of its customers offline. Proximus in Belgium also says a Windows 10 update is …
Kat Hall, 12 Dec 2016
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UK.gov has outsourced tech policy to Ofcom because it is clueless – SNP techie

The UK government has effectively outsourced its policy-making to Blighty's comms watchdog Ofcom because MPs are clueless about telecoms and technology. That's according to Calum Kerr, the Scottish National Party's spokesperson for digital stuff. Speaking to The Register, Kerr also accused the government, BT and Ofcom of …
Kat Hall, 12 Dec 2016
Confidential on white screen in boardroom. Photo by Shutterstock

Top tech company's IP was looted by China, so it plans to hack back

360° Cyber Security Game The poster child for the green energy revolution is in ruins: its executives say they have hard evidence that China's People's Liberation Army stole its breakthrough technology before it could commercialise it. So now the company plans to hack back. The Prime Minister needed response options, so the head of state asked The …
Simon Sharwood, 12 Dec 2016

Busted Windows 8, 10 update blamed for breaking Brits' DHCP

Folks using Windows 10 and 8 on BT and Plusnet networks in the UK are being kicked offline by a mysterious software bug. Computers running the Microsoft operating systems are losing network connectivity due to what appears to be a problem with DHCP. Specifically, it seems some Windows 10 and 8 boxes can no longer reliably …
Gavin Clarke, 09 Dec 2016

HBO slaps takedown demand on 13-year-old girl's painting because it used 'Winter is coming'

Pic It turns out King Joffrey isn't the biggest scumbag at HBO after all. A father says lawyers at the cable TV network demanded his 13-year-old daughter's artwork be taken off the internet after she drew a lovely picture titled "winter is coming" and posted the image to arts'n'craft website RedBubble. "My daughter, who happens …
Shaun Nichols, 08 Dec 2016
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Can ISPs step up and solve the DDoS problem?

Solve the DDoS problem? No problem. We’ll just get ISPs to rewrite the internet. In this interview Ian Levy, technical director of GCHQ’s National Cyber Security Centre, says it’s up to ISPs to rewrite internet standards and stamp out DDoS attacks coming from the UK. In particular, they should change the Border Gateway Protocol …
Image by Lawrey https://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-702868p1.html

Masterful malvertisers pwn Channel 9, Sky, MSN in stealth attacks

A two-year long, highly sophisticated malvertising campaign infected visitors to some of the most popular news sites in the UK, Australia, and Canada including Channel 9, Sky News, and MSN. Readers of those news sites, just a portion of all affected (since it also affected eBay's UK portal), were infected with modular trojans …
Darren Pauli, 08 Dec 2016
Adam Sandler

$17k win for man falsely accused of a terrible crime: Downloading an Adam Sandler movie

Hollywood lawyers have been ordered to foot more than $17,000 in legal bills after falsely accusing a bloke of illegally downloading and sharing the Adam Sandler flick The Cobbler. Thomas Gonzales, of Oregon, US, was sued by legal eagles retained by the movie's makers on the basis that an IP address he paid for was being used …
Iain Thomson, 07 Dec 2016
Migrating birds in the cloud

Cloud Velox sends advance parties to make the cloud feel like home

The vendor formerly know as CloudVelocity, since contracted to CloudVelox, has emitted code to lift and shift networks from your bit barn to Amazon Web Services (AWS). The thinking here is that when you migrate an application to the cloud it's best if the network it's set up to use comes along for the ride, because otherwise …
Simon Sharwood, 07 Dec 2016

Brocade ships switches but makes most noise about DevOps

There's a few shiny boxes in the announcement, but Broadcom-bound Brocade hopes punters will find its automation software and DevOps story even more sparkly than its new kit. Alongside three additions to its SLX switch line – the 9140, 9240, and 9540 – the company's announced an automation suite called the Brocade Workflow …