Articles about Internet Service Providers

If your smart home gear hasn't updated recently, throw it in the trash

When was the last time your smart thermostat, lights, hub, camera, or power socket was updated? If it was a while ago, you may want to think about chucking it in the garbage. That's according to DNS mage and security expert Paul Vixie, who has been using his status in the internet world to increasingly warn about the dangers …
Kieren McCarthy, 05 Dec 2016
Snooping image via Shutterstock

UK Parliament waves through 'porn-blocking' Digital Economy Bill

MPs have passed the UK government's controversial Digital Economy Bill, which will force internet service providers to impose blocks on porn sites that do not include mandatory age checks or feature kinky sex acts. The proposed law has also been heavily criticised for enabling government departments greater access to citizens …
Kat Hall, 29 Nov 2016
Daniel Craig in Casino Royale

Small ISPs 'probably' won't receive data retention order following IP Bill

The government “probably won’t” force internet service providers with no history of working with the intelligence services into retaining internet records following wide-ranging new powers passed in the Investigatory Powers Bill, the Home Office has said. Last week the Investigatory Powers Bill - dubbed the Snoopers Charter - …
Kat Hall, 25 Nov 2016
Australian Parliament House Canberra

IBM pays up after 'clearly failing' DDoS protection for Australia's #censusfail

Australia's census all-but failed due to a combination of poor design, bad operational decisions, human error and numerous lazy and/or bad decisions that could have been avoided had warnings about corporate culture been heeded, or Australian government agencies properly educated about what it takes to deliver digital services …
Simon Sharwood, 25 Nov 2016
handcuffs

No super-kinky web smut please, we're British

Film censors in the United Kingdom will be able to ban Brits from accessing websites that stream especially kinky X-rated videos, if a proposed change in the law gets up. The Digital Economy bill, which is due to penetrate the statute books in early 2017, is set to include a provision that will allow the British Board of Film …
Iain Thomson, 24 Nov 2016
Donald Trump

Donald Trump confirms TPP to be dumped, visa program probed

United States president-elect Donald Trump has released a statement outlining the things he plans to do in his first 100 days in office, three of which will impact the technology industries. In the video, Trump re-states his policy to create a new cyber-defence plan for America. “I will ask the Department of Defence and the …
Simon Sharwood, 22 Nov 2016
Teen argues with her father. Photo by Shutterstock

The new FCC privacy rules are here, and nobody is happy

The FCC has formally approved its new rules for internet service providers on the handling of customer data, and it seems few people on either side are particularly happy. The rules, adopted Thursday [PDF] by the commission after months of debate, call on any company currently providing broadband service to obtain opt-in …
Shaun Nichols, 27 Oct 2016
empty_pockets_648

Hard-up Brits 'should get subsidy for 10Mbps'

Folks in the UK unable to afford speeds of 10Mbps under the Universal Service Obligation (USO) should be offered a subsidy, the representative body for 370 councils has said today. The Local Government Association is calling on the government to introduce a subsidised broadband service to help anyone facing undue hardship in …
Kat Hall, 20 Oct 2016

US government wants Microsoft 'Irish email' case reopened

The United States Department of Justice has asked the nation's Second Circuit Court of Appeals to re-open its three-year-old case attempt to have Microsoft hand over e-mails stored on servers in the Republic of Ireland. At the same time, the Department has dropped more than a hint that Google's in the cross-hairs. In July, …
Green light

Australian telecoms regulator watching over Telstra HFC/NBN deal

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has flagged Telstra's deal to build and maintain plenty of the hybrid fibre-coax (HFC) parts of the National Broadband Network (NBN) as something it needs to watch. The concern is that Telstra's AU$1.6 billion deal to fix the copper and help nbnTM rollout HFC services …
Let's Encrypt browser certificate

Let's Encrypt ups rate limits

Let's Encrypt has revised its rate limits to make life easier for large organisations and hosting providers who use its services. The certificate authority set up rate limits for cert creation as a defence against hacker interference and denial of service attacks. However the limitation created problems for internet service …
John Leyden, 18 Aug 2016

BT best provider for 10Mbps USO, says former digi minister Ed Vaizey

BT's Openreach is the internet provider best placed to deliver the government's plan for a Universal Service Obligation (USO) of 10Mbps by the end of the decade, former digital minister Ed Vaizey has said. Speaking to The Register, Vaizey said: "I think if you want the most effective, quickest and likely-to-be-delivered …
Kat Hall, 18 Aug 2016
Australian $20 burning

Australia's Telstra and Optus outed as two of the world's six most expensive ISPs

Content delivery network Cloudflare has outed Australia's Optus as one of the six most expensive internet service providers in the world, and says the other major local player Telstra is rubbish too. CloudFlare's measuring transit costs for its assessment: as a CDN it is more concerned about shuttling data over carrier …
Simon Sharwood, 18 Aug 2016
Cables containing fibre, etc. Photo by Shutterstock

Colour us shocked: ISPs not that keen to sign up for Universal Service Obligation

Telco regulator Ofcom has admitted that internet service providers are not particularly eager to sign up to the government's Universal Service Obligation. The USO is intended to give everyone the legal right to request 10Mbps by 2018. However, in its summary of responses for its call for input to the plans earlier this year, …
Kat Hall, 16 Aug 2016
NBN logo

Labor's new comms spokesperson Michelle Rowland gets off to a bad start

The new communications spokesperson of Australia's opposition Labor has made a mess of her first foray into the portfolio. New comms shadow Michelle Rowland's parliamentary CV suggests she's got the experience for the job: she was shadow assistant comms spokesperson and has spent two stints on the standing parliamentary …
Simon Sharwood, 14 Aug 2016

UK local govt body blasts misleading broadband speed ads

The representative body for 370 councils in Blighty has hit out at Internet Service Providers (ISPs) for advertising misleading broadband speeds, particularly in rural areas. Current rules allow providers to promote "up to X" download speeds if they can demonstrate that at least 10 per cent of their customers can achieve them …
Kat Hall, 10 Aug 2016
A 56k dial-up modem

ISP roundup: Google mulls fiber-less Fiber, America goes Wow, Comcast still terrible

A flurry of news from internet service providers (ISPs) in the US has picked up what is normally a slow summer season. According to a report from the San Jose Mercury News, Google's planned rollout of its Fiber broadband service in the Bay Area has hit a snag, as the Chocolate Factory is considering a change of course. The …
Shaun Nichols, 09 Aug 2016
NBN truck on Mount Cotton

nbn™ switches on first Telstra HFC-powered broadband services

nbn™, the entity building and operating Australia's national broadband network (NBN), has announced its first services delivered over the hybrid fibre-coax (HFC) cables formerly owned by Australia's dominant carrier Telstra. Ocean Reef, a suburb of the Western Australian capital Perth is the lucky recipient of the new service …
Simon Sharwood, 28 Jul 2016
Australian money at a crime scene

Data retention grants still not flowing to Australia telcos

Australia's telcos and internet service providers still have not been told when they will receive promised grants to help them implement mandatory metadata collection. Australia passed metadata retention laws in 2015 and they came into force on October 13th, 2015, albeit with a two-year grace period in which to satisfy the …
Simon Sharwood, 20 Jul 2016
World with light lines representing connectivity connecting various foci on the globe. Pic via Shutterstock

Net neut: Equal treatment of traffic doesn't mean equal service quality for users

Internet service providers (ISPs) do not need to ensure that the quality of service received by internet users is the same across all of their customers to meet their obligations on treating data equally as it passes over their networks, an EU regulatory body has said. The Body of European Regulators of Electronic …
OUT-LAW.COM, 08 Jun 2016

Iraq shuts down internet to prevent exam cheating. The country's entire internet

The Iraqi government is repeatedly shutting down the country's entire internet to prevent students from cheating in their exams. That is the extraordinary conclusion reached by infrastructure experts delving into why the country has experienced a series of three-hour blackouts at the same time each day for three days in a row …
Kieren McCarthy, 17 May 2016
Undrey http://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-950635p1.html

Popular cache Squid skids as hacker pops lid

Tsinghua University postgraduate student Jianjun Chen has reported a critical cache poisoning vulnerability in the Squid proxy server, a transparent cache widely deployed by internet service providers. The vulnerability allows attackers to compromise connections using a maliciously-crafted packet. A patch has been produced for …
Darren Pauli, 12 May 2016
Smartphone user on Tube

Reduced roaming charges, net neutrality come into force in EU

EU telecoms providers must cut surcharges for 'roaming' phone calls and data use in EU countries from 30 April, in preparation for the complete abolition of roaming charges in June 2017. Until June 2017, telecoms providers will be allowed to charge up to five cents per minute on top of domestic prices, and up to two cents per …
OUT-LAW.COM, 05 May 2016

More questions than answers, literally, from America's privacy rules

Analysis New privacy rules put forward by the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) that are intended to give consumers more rights over what ISPs do with their data have left policymakers scratching their heads. When FCC chairman Tom Wheeler announced last month that he would issue a "notice of proposed rulemaking" – or NPRM in …
Kieren McCarthy, 25 Apr 2016
Kick Me by https://www.flickr.com/photos/pasukaru76/ public domain https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/

Big Content seeks to ban Kickass Torrents from Australia

Australia's music industry wants Kickass Torrents blocked by local internet service providers. The Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) has announced legal action in the Federal Court against the site, under last year's amendments to the Copyright Act. Those amendments, in Section 115A of the Act, allow a right to …

Popular cable modem vulnerable to remote reboot/reset flaw

Updated Security defence man David Longenecker says millions of users could have their internet connections severed thanks to a flaw in Surfboard SB6141 modems. The soon-to-be-patched cross-site request forgery flaw allows attackers to cut off users from the internet until their modem renegotiates with the ISP and reconfigures itself …
Darren Pauli, 11 Apr 2016

Australian Bureau of Statistics stops counting 24Mbps broadband services

Australians downloaded 1,714,922 Terabytes in the 90 days to December 31st, 2015, according to new data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). The bureau's new Internet Activity, Australia, December 2015, released today, points out that 98 per cent of those downloads used wired networks, which rather dampens the …
Simon Sharwood, 06 Apr 2016
Woman in bathrobe is shocked by something she is reading on her laptop. Pic via Shutterstock

So where has the legal 'right' to 10Mbps broadband gone?

Analysis UK Chancellor George Osborne's budget may have provided a sprinkling of sweeteners for businesses and middle class savers alongside the headline-grabbing sugar tax last week, but details on digital infrastructure plans were distinctly lacking. No mention was made of the Universal Service Obligation (USO) in the 148-page …
Kat Hall, 21 Mar 2016
Banned

BT, Sky, EE, TalkTalk and Virgin to appeal website blocking ruling

The Court of Appeal in London must maintain the right of brand owners to obtain website blocking orders against internet service providers as a means of enforcing their trade mark rights against infringers, an expert has said. The Court is expected to hear an appeal by BT, Sky, EE, TalkTalk and Virgin in April against a 2014 …
OUT-LAW.COM, 25 Feb 2016
Pirate in costume

Big Content picks first download-block target: THE SUN!

Australia might be set to join the UK and Singapore in bringing down the boom on an unlicensed Philippines-registered movie-streaming website. SolarMovie – here, for those who want to see how long it takes to get blocked from ordinary Australian web users – has attracted the ire of Hollywood for freely streaming movies and TV …

Facebook cares about you, yes you, so much it won't give up on India

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has taken to Facebook – of course! – to vent about India's decision to ban its neo-colonialist virtual land grab Free Basics internet-on-ramp. His post is written in earnest-ese and makes three points: Facebook is not the only entity trying to help India who will be hurt by India's decision to …
Simon Sharwood, 08 Feb 2016
Ethernet cable rises up like a snake (artist's impression). Image via shutterstock

While we weren't looking, the WAN changed

Sysadmin Blog: Wide Area Networking (WAN) solutions are not discussed enough in the tech press. We babble incessantly about consumer broadband, or some new top end fibre speed achieved in a lab, but this is merely a fraction of the story. There is a very real revolution in WAN connectivity that is occurring right now, today. It goes largely …
Trevor Pott, 05 Feb 2016

T-Mobile US's BingeOn does break net neutrality, says law prof

The T-Mobile US Binge On video service does in fact break network neutrality and so is illegal. That's according to Stanford law professor Barbara van Schewick, who has gone to the trouble of writing 51 pages of analysis [PDF] over the controversial throttled service to reach her conclusion. "Binge On undermines the core …
Kieren McCarthy, 04 Feb 2016
scissors cut cable

Map of Tasmania to be shorn of electrical, data links to outside world

Internet service providers in the Australian state of Tasmanian are bracing for a temporary loss of connectivity, as the owner of the Basslink cable connecting the island state to the mainland scrambles to fix a break in its electricity transmission system. Basslink operates electricity and telecommunications connections …
stripped copper for recycling

Telstra dominates NBN retail, but less than you might think

Telstra's been accused of putting a stranglehold on National Broadband Network (NBN) connections. Our take: not quite yet. The criticisms stem from Murdoch organ The Daily Telegraph, which in an otherwise unremarkable story about the incumbent bulking up its technical staff for the NBN, included this unattributed, unsourced …

Council of Europe gets tough on net neutrality

The Council of Europe has approved and published strong net neutrality guidelines following a meeting in Strasbourg Wednesday. The guidelines are not legally binding but will almost certainly result in legislation that follows its lead being passed across Europe. The council is separate from the European Union, but it is …
Kieren McCarthy, 13 Jan 2016

Hollywood given two months to get real about the price of piracy

Australia's Federal Court has told Big Content to stop pfaffing around and make reasonable demands of those accused of illegally downloading The Dallas Buyers Club (DBC). The case has seen Voltage Pictures, the film's owners, take on a clutch of Australian internet service providers (ISPs) whose subscribers it alleges …
Simon Sharwood, 17 Dec 2015
Ethernet by https://www.flickr.com/photos/razor512/ CC2.0 attribution https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

FCC gives small ISPs a pass on open internet rules

The FCC has extended a rule that will exempt small broadband carriers from portions of its 2015 Open Internet rules. US internet service providers who have less than 100,000 total connections will not be required to provide the detailed transparency reports mandated by the FCC rules. The reports include detailed information …
Shaun Nichols, 16 Dec 2015

New gear needed to capture net connection records, say ISPs

Communication providers will need to invest in new equipment if they are to capture people's internet connection records (ICRs) and comply with planned new UK surveillance laws, three major UK internet service providers (ISPs) have said. Under the Investigatory Powers Bill, proposed by the UK government in November, …
OUT-LAW.COM, 15 Dec 2015

Hate your broadband ISP? Simply tell your city to build one – that'll get the telcos' attention

The answer to getting affordable broadband access to all citizens may lie in more municipal networks funded by local government, according to the OECD. A 91-page report [PDF], drafted by the economics eggheads this month, looks at examples of where local government has introduced new fast networks in eight Western nations, and …
Kieren McCarthy, 30 Nov 2015
Houses of Parliament at night-time

MPs and peers have just weeks to eyeball UK gov's super-snoop bid

IPB A joint panel of cross-party politicos and peers have been granted a very small window to scrutinise the Home Office's draft Investigatory Powers Bill. The committee is expected to report by mid-February next year – which is an incredibly short space of time to pore over a legalese-packed document that runs to nearly 300 pages …
Kelly Fiveash, 26 Nov 2015
Burning copyright symbol. Photo by: Martin Fisch http://www.flickr.com/photos/marfis75/ on flickr"

Lawyers use anti-piracy law to get website blocked over corporate ID brouhaha

Australian law firm Moray & Agnew has written to internet service providers (ISPs) in an attempt to have them block a site hosted in India, citing the new provisions of Australia's Copyright Act that target pirate websites as justifying the ban. The letter, a copy of which has been seen by The Register, alleges that a site is …
Simon Sharwood, 18 Nov 2015

Terrorists seek to commit deadly 'cyber attacks' in UK, says Chancellor Osborne

Following Prime Minister David Cameron's re-announcement of funding increases for UK security personnel, Chancellor George Osborne delivered a speech today to GCHQ workers explaining that the increase is necessary as ISIL is seeking to "develop the capability" to launch deadly cyber attacks against British infrastructure. How …

UK citizens will have to pay government to spy on them

IPB If having the UK government trawl through your internet history and phone calls wasn't enough, it turns out that people will have to pay for the pleasure. Speaking at a Commons Select Committee hearing this week, internet service providers (ISPs) warned that the costs of implementing the system outlined in the government's …
Kieren McCarthy, 11 Nov 2015
GCHQ Benhall doughnut aerial view

Ex-GCHQ chief: Bulk access to internet comms not same as mass surveillance

IPB A specially convened, one-off chinwag about the so-called "tech issues" in the UK government's latest draft super-snoop bill failed to get to the nitty-gritty on Tuesday afternoon. Parliament's science and technology committee faced down industry bods, the former boss of GCHQ and a number of academics to try to better …
Kelly Fiveash, 11 Nov 2015

MPs launch 'TalkTalk' inquiry over security of personal data online

Executives at TalkTalk, including CEO Dido Harding herself, may face a grilling from Members of Parliament over the shoddy security practices which led to the theft of than a million Britons' data from her company. This morning the Culture, Media and Sport Committee announced it had "launched an inquiry into cyber-security …
David Cameron during PMQs on Wednesday, 28 October. Pic credit: Parliament TV

UK.gov plans to legislate on smut filters after EU net neutrality ruling

Prime Minister David Cameron confirmed today that the Tory government planned to legislate on smut filters, following yesterday's net neutrality ruling in the European Union. Cameron told MPs during PMQs that he had "spluttered over my cornflakes" when he read this morning that the EU measures would fail to think of the …
Kelly Fiveash, 28 Oct 2015

IBM's SoftLayer cloud beats AWS, Azure ... at spreading spam

IBM's US$2 billion acquisition SoftLayer is the world's largest source of spam, according to email vanguards Cloudmark and Spamhaus. Big Blue acquired the cloud company in June 2013 and since then net forums have been filled with chatter about the amount of cyber-chaff the Dallas-centred outfit's users are spewing. Spam …
Darren Pauli, 23 Oct 2015
Netflix

Netflix in Australia slower than Mexico, Chile or New Zealand

Optus takes crown from TPG by the barest margin but Australia lags Mexico, Chile and New Zealand Telstra has improved its Netflix download speeds by .46 of a megabit per second, but is still the slowest of the Australian internet service providers the video streamer rates. Netflix today released the September version of its …
Simon Sharwood, 12 Oct 2015
Censored Stamp

Scary Trans-Pacific Partnership trade treaty signed off

The Trans-Pacific partnership, a 12-nation trade treaty negotiated in secret and thought to contain copyright nasties, is all but done. Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the USA and Vietnam have successfully concluded negotiations on the provisions of the secret …
Simon Sharwood, 05 Oct 2015