Articles about Insurance Policy

Dragons and butterflies: The chaos of other people's clouds

Cloud computing was meant to solve the reliability problem, but in practice, it still has a long way to go. Is that an endemic problem with the complexity of cloud computing, or a problem with the way people use it? Cloud infrastructures are meant to be resilient, because they tend to use lots of cheap servers and scale out. …
Danny Bradbury, 05 Feb 2016

Music publisher BMG vs US cable giant Cox: Here's why it matters

Special Report A court case that begins this week will define new boundaries in the relationship between US ISPs and creators, regardless of which way it goes. Music publisher BMG, part of Bertelsmann, is suing cable giant Cox Communications for abetting copyright infringement. The core of the issue is how the ISP handled heavy infringers, …
Andrew Orlowski, 02 Dec 2015
Cohesity C2000

OASIS: Refreshment for dehydrated secondary storage users?

Comment Cohesity has launched its all-embracing secondary storage offering on what looks like an embedded hyper-converged infrastructure appliance platform. We first learned about this startup's technology in June. The intent is to provide a kind of super-secondary storage repository covering the many different secondary storage use …
Chris Mellor, 21 Oct 2015
money_987_648

Apple's big secret: It's an insurance firm (now with added finance)

Analysis Remember "Peak Apple"? It looked vaguely plausible a couple of years ago. For years, the media had stoked consumer expectations of Apple continuing to launch blockbuster, category-defining, market-making new products at regular intervals. Jobs’ biographer had disclosed that his "secret legacy" was “four years of new products …
Andrew Orlowski, 10 Sep 2015
silicon_valley_shutterstock_map_648

The good burghers of Palo Alto are entirely insane

Worstall @ the Weekend El Reg treated us last weekend to the tale of the Buena Vista Mobile Home Park in Palo Alto, where the owner has a small ethical dilemma to deal with. The 4.5 acre site is apparently worth $55 million and the city council would like to buy it, but they've only got $39 million. The dilemma is that if he sells to the city council …
Tim Worstall, 23 Aug 2015
Airwave has given the police reliable comms

Home Office seeks advice on Police Radio omnishambles

The Home Office has announced a new twist in the sorry tale of the Emergency Services Network saga and is asking suppliers to consult on a procurement framework that started two years ago. The government department has published a Prior Information Notice (PIN) for a tender to replace the Airwave communications equipment used …
Simon Rockman, 17 Aug 2015
Herdwick sheep walk towards the camera

You can do more with backup than just cloning your data

As we all know, the world of backup is changing, and not just in obvious ways such as the move to disk and cloud-based backup, the adoption of deduplication, the need to copy, back up and restore virtual machines, and so on. First, flash memory and the wider availability of snapshots and replication means that other elements …
Bryan Betts, 23 Jul 2015
Doctor Nick Riviera

Hackers invade systems holding medical files on 4.5 million Cali patients

UCLA Health hospitals say hackers may have accessed personal information and medical records on 4.5 million patients. The California medical group admitted today that miscreants infiltrated its computer systems as long ago as September. It is possible the intruders accessed databases holding patient names, addresses, dates of …
Shaun Nichols, 17 Jul 2015
A humpback whale shows its open mouth as it breaches the surface of the sea.

Fire, flood and vomit: Defeating the Great White Whale of Fail

I've met a lot of IT people over the years who have a problem comprehending what Business Continuity (BC) actually is. On one hand this is fairly understandable, since to the average IT person “continuity” means making their systems robust and resilient so they can live with a power cut or the loss of one of their sites. Real IT …
Dave Cartwright, 05 Jun 2015

Insurer tells hospitals: You let hackers in, we're not bailing you out

When hackers swiped 32,500 patient records from Cottage Healthcare System, it was sued by its own customers for $4.1m – a bill that was settled by its insurers. Now the insurance company, Columbia Casualty Company, has claimed Cottage's computers were hopelessly insecure, and it wants its money back. Columbia claims the …
Shaun Nichols, 28 May 2015
Apple Watch lineup

Hackers' delight? New Apple wrist-puter gives securobods the FEAR

Security pundits are already fretting over the security of the Apple Watch, just hours after the expensive gizmo was launched at a high profile US event. Ken Westin, security researcher at Tripwire, said that the security implications of the wearable device's Wi-Fi connection capabilities create a potential opportunity for …
John Leyden, 10 Mar 2015

Healthcare: Look anywhere you like for answers, just not the US

Worstall @ the Weekend A few weeks back I pointed out that the US has the second largest social welfare system in the world. This produced a certain amount of pushback (journalistic speak for me whining to El Ed that you commentards are shouting at me) over the fact that a good part of that is the woeful healthcare system in said US. So, as the New …
Tim Worstall, 04 Jan 2015
Microsoft Surface bomb

VMware's new VDI play is self-destructing virtual desktops

VMware has announced a new end-user computing product at its VMworld Europe gabfest. Horizon Flex allows admins to define virtual machines (VMs) and deploy them to Macs or PCs, where they run in desktop hypervisors even when those devices are offline. VMware would prefer you use its own Player on PCs rather than desktop Hyper-V …
Simon Sharwood, 14 Oct 2014
Empty phone battery

Phone charging log helps to convict murderer

An Australian man has been convicted of murder after mobile phone metadata describing when the device was connected to a charger was tabled as evidence. Alison Baden-Clay disappeared from her Brisbane home on April 19th, 2012. Her body was found in a nearby creek 11 days later. Her husband, Gerard Baden-Clay, claimed he was …
Simon Sharwood, 16 Jul 2014
Sinclair QL

Sinclair’s 1984 big shot at business: The QL is 30 years old

Archaeologic In May 1983, Sinclair Research Managing Director Nigel Searle began briefing the press about the successful British micro maker’s next big release. It was 13 months after the company had launched the Spectrum and although that machine had become a huge success, punters and market-watchers were keen to hear about what Sinclair …
Tony Smith, 12 Jan 2014
Google Toilet Paper

Shouldn't we have self calibrating Y-fronts and smart bog roll by now?

Something for the Weekend, Sir? Regular readers of this column, those of you who have have suspiciously too much time on their hands on a Friday afternoon will be aware that I am a IT fraud. Compooters are kinda fun and my second-favourite idea for a perfect Sunday afternoon might involve a bit of screwdriver surgery on a troublesome device, but I don't …
Alistair Dabbs, 29 Nov 2013
Robots breaking down walls and fixing leaky pipes

Who will recover your data if disaster strikes?

Who here has a disaster recovery plan? OK, that's most of you. How many of you have a disaster recovery plan that isn't "panic"? That's a more reasonable number. How many of you have disaster recovery plans that you have actually tested? Excellent! This is encouraging. Now how many of you could implement the full plan before …
Trevor Pott, 15 Nov 2013
Buncefield fire scene

Got it taped: The business of tape-based disaster recovery

Feature For many SMEs, tape disappeared from their landscape as a data storage choice ten or more years ago. Domestically, it exists, if at all, as a legacy item with perhaps a car stereo chewing its way through a selection of fondly regarded C-90s. Still, this lack of public visibility by no means indicates that tape has come to the …
Bob Dormon, 18 Sep 2013
The Register breaking news

So, you gonna foot this '$200bn' hacking bill, insurance giants asked

Multibillion-dollar energy giants, rail companies and other corporations should take out insurance policies for damage caused by hackers, a White House official has suggested. The government apparatchik is working on a so-called Cybersecurity Framework of best practices to safeguard America's critical infrastructure - think …
Jasper Hamill, 08 Aug 2013
The Register breaking news

Google's $1 fiber deal will cost Provo, Utah $1.7m

Google's sweetheart deal to take over the city of Provo, Utah's loss-making fiber network will come with hidden costs, the city's mayor has revealed. Last week, The Register reported that the Provo city council was planning to vote on a deal that would allow Google to take ownership of the city's multimillion-dollar municipal …
Neil McAllister, 25 Apr 2013

IBM tops chart for churning out patents for the 20TH TIME

It may be arguable whether patents are desirable or over-prescribed in the high tech industry, but there is no doubt that companies use patents as competitive – and anticompetitive – weapons, and therefore they have a huge value. Applying for and receiving lots of patents, then, can be seen as an insurance policy against …
The Register breaking news

Euro Central Bank to tighten grip on web cash security

The European Central Bank (ECB) is consulting on new standards to increase the security of internet payments in the European Union. The draft recommendations (26-page/991KB PDF) incorporate the work of the European Forum on the Security of Retail Payments (SecuRe Pay), which was set up in 2011 to encourage cooperation between …
OUT-LAW.COM, 24 Apr 2012

Intel brings bigger guns to AMD server chip war

Analysis If you want to get into the server processor racket, here's some advice: Don't bring a knife to a gun fight. And when you whip out your guns, you better have a piece stashed in each of your boots, maybe another high-caliber rifle on your back, and a few knives while you are at it for price-cutting when the bullets run out. With …
The Register breaking news

Sony insurer says it's not liable for costs of data breach

Sony has been sued by its insurance company, which says the policy it issued doesn't cover a series of high-profile security breaches that exposed personal information associated with more than 100 million accounts. A complaint filed Wednesday by the Zurich American Insurance Company (ZAIC) and the Zurich Insurance Company said …
Dan Goodin, 22 Jul 2011
FileMaker Bento

FileMaker Bento

iOS App of the Week When the leeches at NatWest recently decided to increase my home insurance premiums yet again, I decided it was time to take my business elsewhere. It was Bento that helped me to carry out an inventory of my home and belongings for my new insurance policy. FileMaker Bento Bento isn't your average database The Bento app is a …
Cliff Joseph, 26 May 2011
W**k-o-Meter

W**k-O-Meter

NSFW App of the Week If you're going to do something, do it properly. A fine creed, and just as applicable to playing the pink oboe as any other worthwhile hobby. Designed not only to tell you how well you are doing it and what effect it’s having, but also to encourage the development of your technique and make it a more pleasurable experience, this …
The Register breaking news

Peruvian spuds entombed in Arctic 'doomsday vault'

More than 1,000 Peruvian potato varieties are destined for entombment in the Arctic's Svalbard Global Seed Vault amid fears they may be threatened in their traditional home. The BBC explains that the Cusco Potato Park will provide 1,500 distinct tuber examples for storage in the "doomsday vault", whose purpose is to "store …
Lester Haines, 17 Feb 2011
graph up

The lowdown on storage and data protection

Deep dive El Reg has teamed up with the Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA) for a series of deep dive articles. Each month, the SNIA will deliver a comprehensive introduction to basic storage networking concepts. The first article explores data protection. Part1: Fundamental Concepts in Data Protection Data protection is …
channel

How I went from punting PCs to betting a quarter billion on Betfair

Interview Former channel man Peter Webb has become one of Betfair's leading customers and bets a quarter of a billion pounds annually on horseracing alone. He also sloshes a good amount on the X Factor market. The ex Compaq and Medion man finally left the UK's computer distribution channel in 2003 to make a full time go of trading on the …
Robert Blincoe, 06 Dec 2010
The Register breaking news

How to make boots on Mars affordable - One way trips

One of the main limiting factors on a manned mission to Mars is the fact that, under normal assumptions, much of the stuff that travelled to the red planet would not be concerned with exploration but rather with bringing the crew back to Earth. The solution? According to two scientists, it would make more sense for the first …
Lewis Page, 15 Nov 2010
The Register breaking news

Reg hacks crawl from London to Brighton

You might imagine that the Paper Aircraft Released Into Space team would be taking a well-deserved Caribbean beach break following their recent high-altitude triumph, but no sooner had the dust settled on PARIS than we were ready to face a new, and perhaps even more daunting challenge: the London to Brighton Veteran Car Run. It …
Lester Haines, 09 Nov 2010
channel

MS pitches Windows 7 at biz world ahead of Chrome OS release

Microsoft is telling biz punters not to put off upgrading their operating system to Windows 7 while they wait for Internet Explorer 9 to be released. Unsurprisingly, the software vendor is encouraging business customers to adopt Windows 7 ahead of the expected spring 2011 arrival of IE 9. Redmond typically pushes customers to …
Kelly Fiveash, 22 Sep 2010
The Register breaking news

What Nokia (and everyone else) needs to learn about smartphones

When Gene Roddenberry was devising the original Star Trek in 1965, he predicted humans would make common use of teleportation and faster-than-lightspeed travel. But one 23rd century innovation was either missing, or absent because nobody wanted it: converged electronic devices. Cosmonauts who needed a data device got a …
Andrew Orlowski, 16 Sep 2010
The Register breaking news

Illumos sporks OpenSolaris

If you were hoping that someone would fork the OpenSolaris operating system, you are going to have to settle for a spork. You know, half spoon and half fork. That, in essence, is what the Illumos, an alternative open source project to continue development on the core bits of OpenSolaris, is all about. The disgruntled OpenSolaris …
The Register breaking news

Bloody George's Budget: How bad is it really?

Analysis Oooh, I do love a good budget. It's an opportunity to poke fun at all the nonsensical misunderstandings of economics that politicians are prey to. Even if someone proposes something sensible you can be sure that the opposition to it will be rooted in a misconception of reality. So, what does this budget have for us today? …
Tim Worstall, 22 Jun 2010
Freecom Data Recover Service

Hardware biggest cause of HDD failure, says Freecom

External hard drive maker Freecom has revealed that almost half of all hard drive crashes are caused by hardware failure. While launching a new, low-cost data recovery service, Freecom said its internal estimates suggest manufacturing flaws and age together account for 49 per cent of all hard drive failures. By contrast, …
Tony Smith, 23 Mar 2010
Cat 5 cable

Intel takes out $1.25bn insurance policy

Intel's take on today's settlement of its multiple legal entanglements with rival AMD is simple: we didn't do anything wrong, we're not going to change, and we think $1.25bn is a reasonable amount to spend to avoid trial - and, possibly, to guard against even more-serious legal challenges. Or, as Intel executive vice president …
Rik Myslewski, 12 Nov 2009
The Register breaking news

Windows 7 gets built in XP mode

Microsoft is adding a "Windows XP Mode" to Windows 7, in a move to encourage users to make the switch to the software vendor's forthcoming operating system. The firm has built its XP mode into Windows 7 by using the Windows Virtual PC technology Microsoft acquired in 2003, to make the OS compatible to run apps designed for …
Kelly Fiveash, 27 Apr 2009
The Register breaking news

San Francisco's 'rogue' sysadmin faces trial

Terry Childs, the allegedly rogue sysadmin accused of locking San Francisco authorities out of their own network at a cost of hundreds of thousands of dollars, will stand trial on four charges of tampering with a computer network. At a preliminary hearing last week, a judge ruled there was enough evidence of his probable guilt …
The Register breaking news

Snow blankets London for Global Warming debate

Snow fell as the House of Commons debated Global Warming yesterday - the first October fall in the metropolis since 1922. The Mother of Parliaments was discussing the Mother of All Bills for the last time, in a marathon six hour session. In order to combat a projected two degree centigrade rise in global temperature, the Climate …
Andrew Orlowski, 29 Oct 2008

Apple MacBook

Review It was no secret that Apple was planning to update its laptop range this month, but the early betting was on a new, budget-priced MacBook to win over even more consumers to the platform. Macs have been selling extremely well over the last year or so, edging towards ten per of the market in the US, compared to Apple’s traditional …
Stephen Dean, 17 Oct 2008
The Register breaking news

SSL covers security embarrassments with EV figleaf

Whitepaper SSL has become something of a default 'security' stamp online. So much of a 'default' in fact that Phishers and other scammers now adopt it as a means of validating their scam site. Extended Validation SSL hopes to overcome this problem through stricter application procedures and greater visibility. The adage ‘buyer beware’ used …
The Register breaking news

Rogue SF sysadmin may cost city over $1m

The disgruntled sysadmin accused of locking San Francisco out of its IT network may cost the city more than $1m in upgrades, consultants and repairs to undo the damage, according to the City's Department of Technology. Terry Childs, a 43-year-old from the Bay Area city of Pittsburg, is accused of creating a super password for …
Austin Modine, 10 Sep 2008
Dollar

Dollar surge helps software vendors soak customers

Analysis US software vendors are jacking up their price lists in Europe, and are blaming the weak dollar for the hike. Citrix earlier this month quietly told its customers that its suggested retail price on all products would rise more than ten per cent in its Europe, Middle East, Africa and Asia-Pacific markets from 1 September 2008 …
Kelly Fiveash, 18 Aug 2008
The Register breaking news

Irate sysadmin locks San Francisco officials out of network

Hapless municipal bosses in San Francisco have been locked out of their network by a disgruntled sysadmin charged with computer sabotage. Terry Childs, 43 and of Pittsburg, California, was held on remand over the weekend pending the outcome of committal proceedings (an arraignment) on Tuesday where he faces four counts of …
John Leyden, 15 Jul 2008
Windows Vista teaser

Microsoft says ‘hasta la vista XP’ - well, kinda

Microsoft yesterday sent customers a letter reaffirming its plans to kill off Windows XP sales at the end of June and that system builders can continue to ship machines loaded with the OS until early 2009. That widely-known caveat has been viewed by many as a considerable insurance policy for the software giant, which has …
Kelly Fiveash, 24 Jun 2008

Nvidia CEO says 'no' to VIA acquisition

Nvidia doesn't want to buy VIA, the graphics chip maker's CEO has claimed. Nvidia is completely focused on being a "visual computing technology company", he said. Well, for the moment, at any rate... Speaking to CNet, Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang suggested neither Nvidia nor VIA are interested in acquiring each other's business …
Tony Smith, 12 May 2008
The Register breaking news

Weapons, oil prices driving worldwide atom ambitions

A crush of developing nations trying to gatecrash the nuclear power club has prompted fears of a subsequent race to develop nuclear weapons. The UN nuke regulator, the International Atomic Energy Authority (IAEA), says that it has recently been approached by 40 countries, all expressing an interest in nuclear power. According …
Lewis Page, 12 May 2008
The Register breaking news

Surrey Satellite to be bought by EADS Astrium

Britain's flagship space company, Surrey Satellite Technology Limited (SSTL), has announced that it will be acquired by a foreign buyer. The University of Surrey spinout sat maker announced today that it will henceforth be part of EADS Astrium, the space arm of European arms'n'aerospace titan European Aeronautics Defence and …
Lewis Page, 08 Apr 2008
The Register breaking news

Apple 'mulls all-you-can-eat music plan'

So now we can guess why Apple has clung so tightly to DRM, which has all but disappeared from major label digital music retail in recent months. It remains a powerful bargaining chip. The tech giant is negotiating with the music business to offer unlimited downloads from its iTunes store, the FT reports today. Money would be …
Andrew Orlowski, 19 Mar 2008