Articles about Illegal Goods

The Register breaking news

Facebook ad helps Scot cops seize fake goods, drugs

Cash, drugs and illegal goods have been seized in Scotland after coppers logged into Facebook to snare the crooks. The plod bagged over £68,000 in cash, drugs valued at £21,000 and £13,000 of counterfeit goods during Operation Opulent, which followed a campaign that let people report via the web anyone thought to be making money …

Cops cuff 5 suspects after Silk Road copycat secret drug souk bust

Five alleged drug dealers - who used a concealed website called Utopia to sell their illegal wares - have been arrested by Dutch and German police. The website was seized by cops working on Operation Commodore, Netherlands' public prosecutions service said in a statement on Wednesday. Utopia, a copycat of Silk Road that was …
Team Register, 13 Feb 2014

Bitcoin ban row latest: 'Unstable, loved by criminals' Yup, that's the US dollar – Colorado rep

A US Congressman has proposed a ban on the American dollar to mock colleagues who are campaigning against Bitcoin. Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colorado) said the American dollar bill, much like the Bitcoin cryptocurrency, was "unregulated and unstable," and had been used for illicit criminal activity. Polis, a former web entrepreneur …
Shaun Nichols, 06 Mar 2014
money_yen_dollar_pound

Crack Euro banker team to probe whether virtual currencies should be regulated

The European Banking Authority (EBA) will create a taskforce to advise it on whether virtual currencies should be regulated. The watchdog said that the taskforce will be created before July and have the objective of answering the question of whether virtual currencies "can and ought to be regulated". The taskforce will analyse …
OUT-LAW.COM, 04 Mar 2014
Targeted Spam

Spam drops as legit biz dumps mass email ads: Only the dodgy remain

Spam email was down in volume last year, but junk mail messages still comprise two in three items of electronic communication sent over the interwebs. Kaspersky Lab reports the portion of spam in email flows was as high as 69.6 per cent in 2013 – which is 2.5 percentage points lower than 2012. The biggest sources of spam were …
John Leyden, 24 Jan 2014

Glassholes, snapt**ts, #blabbergasms, selfies and PRISM: The Reg's review of 2013

Year in Review "Selfie" is the Oxford English Dictionary's word of the year. There's nothing new about a "selfie" - it's a self-portrait - but a perfect storm of social networks and smartphones has given popularity to a word and an act even world leaders feel it's OK to do on really serious occasions. In keeping with a long tradition here at …
Gavin Clarke, 31 Dec 2013
Pirates ahoy!

Street-savvy Microsoft tries to pop the pimply face of piracy

Microsoft has tagged schoolkids as the UK's worst culprits for illegally downloading files from the net. The company, in its latest swoop on software piracy, today put out the results of a new study - dubbed Real Thing - which was based on a survey of just 270 children and 1,200 adults aged 16 and above. It found that 54 per …
Kelly Fiveash, 15 Jul 2008
The Register breaking news

EC begins IP enforcement campaign

The European Commission has launched a new campaign against piracy and counterfeiting in non-EU countries, in a bid to stem estimated losses of between €120bn and €370bn a year. The commission says the main thrust of the campaign will be to ensure rigorous enforcement of existing intellectual property rights (IPR) laws, focusing …
Lucy Sherriff, 10 Nov 2004
The Register breaking news

Heise ordered to remove link to Slysoft.com

A Munich court has ruled that German news site Heise Online was wrong to publish a link to Slysoft.com, a company that advertises software that can play, copy and rip protected audio CDs. In January the German IT site received a writ from the German music industry preventing it from publishing links to the company. A court last …
Jan Libbenga, 11 Apr 2005
The Register breaking news

Microsoft names and shames Net pirates

Microsoft is suing alleged software pirates across six US states for selling illegal goods via the Internet. According to Microsoft, three of the defendants were flogging fake software through online auction sites, and at least two relied on spamming via email. All used the Inernet as their primary forum for distributing the …
Linda Harrison, 09 Dec 1999