Articles about Gps

Hong Kong chip boffins wheel out another NB-IoT reference design

A few days after ARM bought a couple of Internet of Things startups focused on digital signal processing and integrated IoT chip offerings, a Hong Kong-US joint venture has wheeled out something that looks very similar. Hong Kong’s Applied Science and Technology Research Institute (ASTRI), in conjunction with signal processing …
Gareth Corfield, 28 Feb 2017
Wire wastepaper bin filled with scrunched up paper. Photo by Shutterstock

NHS patient letters meant for GPs went undelivered for years

The NHS has been accused of covering up a large data loss involving the loss or mislaying of more than half a million pieces of confidential information. Confidential medical correspondence – including test results, diagnoses and treatment plans – between GPs and hospitals went undelivered during the five years from 2011 to …
John Leyden, 27 Feb 2017

Dell offers crunch-in-a-box set of Edge teeth to Internet of Things things

Dell has developed the Edge Gateway 3000 Series of boxes so IoT customers can do some data analysis at the edge of their IoT network, to make real-time local decisions about the operations of IoT-monitored machinery and reduce bandwidth needs for data transfer to a central site. These embedded systems have been developed from …
Chris Mellor, 27 Feb 2017

LG, Huawei unwrap 'Samsung Galaxy-killers'

MWC This year’s flagship smartphones will run even faster and have even more features than last year’s flagship smartphones, The Register discovered today. Who knew? With Samsung delaying the launch of its Galaxy S8 flagship until after Mobile World Congress, both LG and Huawei used the event to capitalise on the delay. So let’s …
Andrew Orlowski, 26 Feb 2017

Symbolic IO reveals tech bound to give server old guard the willies

Analysis Symbolic IO has rewritten the server hardware and operating system rule book with its its computationally defined storage (CDS) and says apps like database queries run 60 times or more faster on its system. If these claims are real then server suppliers like Cisco, Dell, HPE and others are in for a mighty market shock as one …
Chris Mellor, 24 Feb 2017
Spanner and bolt photo via Shutterstock

How Google Spanner's easing our distributed SQL database woes

Storage Architect I've been messing about with databases for a long time. I say "messing about" because I've never been a DBA, but as a systems programmer and storage administrator, I've been on the periphery of the application layer and of course I've deployed many personal databases. I was intrigued to read about the new global distributed …
Chris Evans, 22 Feb 2017
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Corpse of US anti-spying law unearthed, reanimated, pushed blinking into the sunlight

US Congressional lawmakers on Wednesday reintroduced legislation to establish rules limiting how American government agencies can obtain a person's whereabouts. The Geolocation Privacy and Surveillance Act (GPS Act), sponsored by Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah), and Rep. John Conyers, Jr. (D-Mich), was …
Thomas Claburn, 16 Feb 2017

Finally, a use for your mobile phone: Snapping ALIEN signal blurts

Friends, take out your mobiles in the name of science! Astronomers from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics are trying to look for fast radio bursts in the Milky Way galaxy with “low-cost radio receivers.” And by that, they mean, your smartphones. Galactic fast radio bursts (FRBs) have left astronomers scratching …
Katyanna Quach, 15 Feb 2017
pulsar

Pulsating white dwarf described as a 'dynamo' found, no, not in the back pages, 380 LY away

Fifty years after pulsars were discovered, scientists in the UK and South Africa have spotted the first white dwarf that mimics the emissions of a neutron star. Collapsed star AR Scorpii (AR Sco), spotted 380 light years away by a team from the University of Warwick and the South African Astronomical Observatory, is about the …
Iain Thomson, 08 Feb 2017
Solar storm - Shutterstock

US government agency pops 16 years of solar weather data online

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has released 16 years' worth of GPS solar weather data gathered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory for all comers. The data, available here, comes from instruments aboard GPS satellites and other sources. Los Alamos explains the release is designed to help researchers create …
robot smart home assistant illustration

Huawei could rescue Amazon's Alexa from the smart home

Analysis Huawei’s upcoming launch of a smartphone incorporating Amazon’s Alexa virtual assistant will mark a new phase in one of the most important battles for the modern internet experience. Voice-activated assistants - which use powerful AI engines to deliver detailed, context-aware and personalized answers to users’ questions – are …
Wireless Watch, 26 Jan 2017

Euro space agency's Galileo satellites stricken by mystery clock failures

Europe's GPS-alike system Galileo is suffering a number of unexplained clock failures on its satellites, the European Space Agency has admitted. Each of the 18 Galileo satellites currently in orbit carries four maser*-based atomic clocks. Two clocks are hydrogen-based, while the other pair use rubidium. The ESA says the clocks …
Gareth Corfield, 18 Jan 2017

Drone company fails to take off, tells pre-orderers: You can have your $34m back

Lily Robotics, which three years ago set out to create a flying camera, is shutting up shop and returning $34m to customers who had placed pre-orders. The firm announced yesterday that it had conceded defeat in its race against the "clock of ever-diminishing funds" despite the capital raised for the $899 camera-copter. Lily …
Karmera secured Pixel phone photo2 by Kaymera

Security hardened, pah! Expert doubts Kaymera's mighty Google's Pixel

The arrival of a security hardened version of Google’s supposed "iPhone killer" Pixel phone from Kaymera has received a sceptical reception from one expert. Kaymera Secured Pixel is outfitted with Kaymera’s own hardened version of the Android operating system and its security architecture. This architecture is made up of four …
John Leyden, 12 Jan 2017
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Google caps punch-yourself-in-the-face malicious charger hack

Google has capped a dangerous but somewhat obscure boot mode vulnerability that allowed infected PCs and chargers to put top end Nexus phones into denial of service states. IBM reported the flaw (CVE-2016-8467) which allows infected computers and malicious power chargers to compromise Nexus 6 and 6p phones. Google badged the …
Darren Pauli, 09 Jan 2017
Runner photo, via Shutterstock

Slim pickings by the Biggest Loser: A year of fitness wearables

Something for the Weekend, Sir? Welcome back. Did you manage to take some time off over the Christmas holiday or were you (figuratively) chained to a (virtual) roomful of (literally) overheating blades? Either way, count yourself lucky simply for making it through to 2017 with your heart still beating. You are among the only humans left alive, after all, and …
Alistair Dabbs, 06 Jan 2017

Santa's sleigh gets 21st century makeover

NSF Kids Santa is going to get* a turbo charged helper this Xmas in the form a of the GS-900 gadget sleigh. For a cool £199,995 excluding VAT, Santa’s new metal bastard could be assembled to include GPS, a convertible roof, hybrid powered rocket boosters, heated seats, parking sensors and a chimney cam. If there’s enough interest in …
Paul Kunert, 16 Dec 2016
CYGNSS

NASA – get this – just launched 8 satellites from a rocket dropped from a plane at 40,000ft

Video NASA's Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) has made it safely into orbit after being air-launched from Orbital ATK's Stargazer aircraft. CYGNSS consists of eight mini-satellites that orbit around the tropical zone of Earth that spawns most of our hurricanes and cyclones. The birds will provide daily updates on …
Iain Thomson, 16 Dec 2016
Galileo

Galileo! Galileo! Galileo! Galileo! Galileo fit to go: Europe's GPS-like network switches on

After a long and much-delayed 17-year gestation, Europe's answer to America's GPS system has been switched on. The Galileo network will offer a free service with an accuracy of one metre, and can pinpoint locations down to a few centimetres for paying customers. The service has 18 satellites in orbit, with 30 projected by 2020 …
Iain Thomson, 15 Dec 2016
A British Army Watchkeeper drone lands at Parc Aberporth. Crown copyright

Poor software design led to second £1m Army spy drone crash

An Army Watchkeeper drone flown by the Royal Artillery crashed on landing after its crew selected the self-flying craft’s “master override” function, according to the official report into the accident. Thales Watchkeeper drone WK006 flopped into the runway at Boscombe Down airfield in November 2015 when its two-man crew, …
Gareth Corfield, 15 Dec 2016
Toronto Google Map image via Shutterstock

OpenStreetView? You are no longer hostage to Google's car-driven vision

Open Source Insider One of the great bright lights of open-source software and user-driven community projects is OpenStreetMap, which offers an open-source mapping platform similar to, but also very philosophically different than, Google Maps. It manages to duplicate most of Google Maps using primarily the contributions of enthusiastic users, too …
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Who killed Pebble? Easy: The vulture capitalists

Comment We just didn’t know it at the time, but Pebble’s fate was sealed in May 2013 when it surrendered control to outsiders who saddled it with debt. Yesterday Pebble’s new owner Fitbit lost no time in closing down the operation, not merely snuffing out any prospect of new products, but warning Pebble owners that they’re not going …
Andrew Orlowski, 08 Dec 2016

Android, Qualcomm move on insecure GPS almanac downloads

Nearly a decade after it introduced assisted-GPS in its mobile chipsets, Qualcomm has squished a bug that allowed miscreants to mess around with people's location services, or crash their phones. In 2007, Qualcomm made GPS signal acquisition faster by using an almanac of satellites. Instead of having to acquire signals blindly …
Mail rail Royal Mail courtesy of The British Postal Museum and Archive

Going underground: The Royal Mail's great London train squeeze

Geek's Guide to Britain For the last 13 years, a tiny train tunnel running through the centre of London has remained empty and unused, maintained by just four engineers. But these engineers don’t work for Transport for London or Network Rail – they work for the Royal Mail. The small gauge tunnel, running for 10.46km (6.5 miles) from Paddington to …
Professional carbon drone with GPS. Pic via Shutterstock

Brit upstart releases free air traffic app for drone operators

British startup Altitude Angel has, in conjunction with air traffic control service NATS, launched an air-traffic-as-a-service app for drone operators. Drone Assist "presents drone pilots with an interactive map of areas of airspace used by commercial air traffic", according to Altitude Angel. The theory is that the large …
Gareth Corfield, 01 Dec 2016
racks of Fujistu lettuce

Fujitsu pivots from chips to leaves with salad-as-a-service

Fujitsu has launched a joint venture to supply the snowbound, sausage-and-root-veg-loving residents of Finland with scrummy salad all year round as part of its efforts to make farming a cloud-based endeavour. Fujitsu Greenhouse Technology Finland Oy, which will be jointly financed with local horticulturalists Robbe's Little …
Joe Fay, 28 Nov 2016
Professional carbon drone with GPS. Pic via Shutterstock

Missile tech helps boffins land drone on car moving at 50 km/h

Robotics boffins have landed an autonomous quadcopter on a car moving at 50 km/h and think doing so might just change the drone business. As explained at arXiv by a group of researchers from Mobile Robotics and Autonomous Systems Laboratory at Polytechnique Montreal, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, aka drones) look handy for …
Simon Sharwood, 24 Nov 2016

Boffins turn phone into tracker by abusing pairing with – that's right – IoT kit

Black Hat EU Security researchers have worked out how to hack into a smartphone and turn it into a tracking device by abusing its pairing with a Belkin home automation device. Joe Tanen and Scott Tenaglia of Invincea Labs were able to root a WeMo device before injecting code into the WeMo Android app from a compromised WeMo device. The …
John Leyden, 07 Nov 2016
Activity tracking wristbands for all comers

'Every step your anti-theft tracker takes – I'll be watching you'

Tracking widgets that you stick on your keys and wallet so you don't lose them are riddled with security vulnerabilities, we're told. These tracker devices allow folks to locate valuable items and find them again. They communicate over Bluetooth with iOS and Android handhelds, so if they go out of range of each other, a little …
John Leyden, 25 Oct 2016
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Finally, that tech fad's over: Smartwatch sales tank more than 50%

The latest figures on smartwatch shipments have shown a dramatic decline in interest among consumers. Analyst house IDC reported a 51.6 per cent drop in smartwatch sales, with just 2.7 million wrist-mounted computers shipped in the third quarter of the year, compared to 5.6 million over the same period last year. Apple and …
Iain Thomson, 24 Oct 2016
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GPS spoofing can put Yik Yak in a flap

A little machine learning can de-anonymise Yik Yak users, according to researchers from American and Chinese universities. Yik Yak is an anonymous messaging app that raised US$70 million, acts like a location-aware Twitter and has become a preferred tool of trolls on US College campuses. The researchers didn't attack the Yik …
University of California Riverside assisted-GPS model

Location boffins demo satellite-free navigation

With both the US and Russia researching Global Positioning System (GPS) jamming, it's heartening to see boffins working on navigation systems that don't rely solely on satellite signals. Research led by the University of California Riverside (UCR), and presented at a navigation system conference in mid-September, demonstrated …
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Russia tests sat jamming

Russia is reportedly testing weaponry to jam US communications satellites. Russian broadsheet Izvestia reports the Ministry of Defense has developed the technology to jam low-orbit satellites operated by the likes of GlobalStar, OneWeb, and Iridium. The Ministry did not confirm the report. Jammers would be placed in the …
Darren Pauli, 10 Oct 2016
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Google melts 78 Android security holes, two of which were critical

Google has crushed 78 Android security flaws in its October bug blitzkrieg, repairing critical core Android services along the way. The patch parade sees the tech giant return to a high-double-digit patch run after issuing only 47 fixes last month and a whopping 103 in August. The updates are split into essential Android …
Darren Pauli, 05 Oct 2016

Microsoft disbands Band band – and there'll be no version 3

“Devices come and go,” mused Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella this March, discussing the wearables market. Now Nadella can notch up another hardware kill. Microsoft, the only enterprise vendor with a wearable platform, has confirmed it has no plans to launch a third version of its activity wearable, the Microsoft Band. Reports also …
Andrew Orlowski, 04 Oct 2016
Vintage PC with floppy drive, dot matrix printer and old school desk phone, steaming coffee: a still life. photo by Shutterstock

DARPA does a podcast

US military lunacy department DARPA has begun offering a podcast. This is cautious move from an agency more famous for being well ahead of the technology curve and creating killer laser beams, cyborg soldiers and telepathic control systems. Of course the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) also created much of …
John Oates, 28 Sep 2016
Woman on phone waits for signal against countryside backdrop. Photo by Shutterstock

Ofcom punts network-sniffing Android app

Telecoms regulator Ofcom has written a network tracking Android app so the great British public can help it sniff out not-spots. The app runs in the background gathering anonymous data on network performance, voice call success, mobile data performance and app usage. It downloads a small amount of data every 15 minutes, less …
John Oates, 28 Sep 2016
Cambridge bikes photo MK Jones via Shutterstock

Turing, Hauser, Sinclair – haunt computing's Cambridge A-team stamping ground

Geek's Guide to Britain King’s Parade in Cambridge looks like the last street on earth to have anything to do with computing. On one side is an absurdly ornate college gatehouse in yellow stone and King’s College Chapel, which combines the barn-like shape of a tiny chapel with the scale and detail of a cathedral. The other side is lined by tall …
SA Mathieson, 26 Sep 2016
Starship robot

R2D2 delivery robots to scurry through the streets of San Francisco

An Estonian robotics company is trialling six-wheeled delivery robots that can trundle through San Francisco delivering goods to the local population. The robots are built by Starship Technologies, a company founded in 2014 by Skype cofounders Janus Friis and Ahti Heinla, and can trundle along at 6kph (3.7mph) delivering goods …
Iain Thomson, 25 Sep 2016

iPhone 7's Qualcomm, Intel soap opera dumps a carrier lock-out on us

Analysis Love rat Apple two-times its long-suffering squeeze Qualcomm with dishy Intel – and it's going to keep the baby but only let some of us see it. Over a cheap bottle of chardonnay one dark night in Cupertino, Intel wooed Apple with flimsy promises. The pair felt a connection (around the 1.9GHz mark) after the iPhone maker opened …
Chris Williams, 18 Sep 2016
ASV Global C-Worker 5 robot boat

Rise of the Machines at Sea: The British firm building robot boats

RotM As the pace of automation gathers speed – from the Internet of Things to factory floors – there's a lot going on quietly but efficiently in robot boats, in particular, with Portchester-based ASV Global. Founded in 1998 "as an idea", ASV – which stands for Autonomous Surface Vehicles – took off in 2007 after winning a research …
Gareth Corfield, 16 Sep 2016

Google GPS grab felt like a feature, was actually a bug

Google has confirmed that its Play digital tat bazaar made a whole lot of unexpected attempts to locate users even after they opted-out of location services. But Google says the behaviour was a bug, not a feature. "Amanda", a Google Play community manager, posted the following in the forum that kicked off the furore: We …

Google's become an obsessive stalker and you can't get a restraining order

Comment Google isn’t just interested in tracking you, or even very interested. Google tracks you with the defiant zeal of an obsessive stalker. What’s curious is that the American state seems almost as keen on the unfettered collection and use of location data as Google itself. Phones incorporated GPS silicon long before the iPhone …
Andrew Orlowski, 14 Sep 2016

Delete Google Maps? Go ahead, says Google, we'll still track you

Google, it seems, is very, very interested in knowing where you are at all times. Users have reported battery life issues with the latest Android build, with many pointing the finger at Google Play – Google's app store – and its persistent, almost obsessive need to check where you are. Amid complaints that Google Play is …
Kieren McCarthy, 12 Sep 2016
Tesla crash

Tesla to stop killing drivers: Software update beamed to leccy cars

Tesla is changing how its "Autopilot" super-cruise-control works in response to the death of one of its customers. The over-the-air software update will be automatically applied to the electric cars this month and will expand the use of radar sensors to decide whether a crash is likely to occur. In a blog post on the Tesla …
Kieren McCarthy, 12 Sep 2016

The Rise, Fall and Return of TomTom

Interview Yesterday TomTom announced seven new consumer products (eight if you count the two SatNav units) with four fitness and three navigation products, its highest High Street profile for some years. Corinne Vigreux Corinne Vigreux Tech pundits were preparing the last rites for the SatNav pioneer a few years ago, but it has …
Andrew Orlowski, 09 Sep 2016

Pains us to run an Apple article without the words 'fined', 'guilty' or 'on fire' in it, but here we are

Apple held court in San Francisco on Tuesday to announce updates for the iPhone and Apple Watch lines. Speaking to a hand-picked crowd at the Bill Graham Auditorium (The Register was not invited), CEO Tim Cook showcased the annual updates for both the smartwatch and smartphone pieces of Apple's lineup. A very swimmable Apple …
Shaun Nichols, 07 Sep 2016
An Air Asia Airbus A330. Pic: Mingman/Shutterstock

Typo made Air Asia X flight land at Melbourne instead of Malaysia

Finger trouble with onboard navigation systems led to an Air Asia flight making a two-hour internal hop in Australia before its scheduled journey to Malaysia. An investigation report by the Australian Transportation Safety Bureau (ATSB) into the March flight disclosed the cockup, which it said was down to the A330's captain “ …
Gareth Corfield, 07 Sep 2016
An artist sketches with Yoga Book

Lenovo's tablet with a real pen, Acer's monster laptop, Samsung Galaxy S3 watch

IFA 2016 August 31st was press day one ahead of the IFA event in Berlin, which means vendors lining up to show off their latest efforts in (mainly) consumer electronics. Acer kicked off the madness, unveiling the "world's first laptop with a curved screen," though you should think twice before letting the 8 kg Predator 21X gaming …
Tim Anderson, 01 Sep 2016

Baltimore cops: We flew high-res camera planes to film your every move

Analysis Police in Baltimore, US, have admitted hiring a third party to fly over the city, constantly recording events with high-resolution cameras. The admission comes after a Businessweek feature on the company, Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS), led to a condemnation of the practice by the ACLU's privacy expert and media …
Kieren McCarthy, 25 Aug 2016