Articles about Distribution

Miscreants tripled output of proof of concept exploits in 2015

Hackers collectively tripled the production of Proof-of-Concept exploits last year, according to a new study out on Thursday. Researchers and black hats develop proof-of-concept (PoC) exploits for research or demonstration purposes. These PoCs are developed for a various reasons – to demonstrate that software is vulnerable, …
John Leyden, 05 May 2016

BT Sport takes Elemental step of software encoding

Analysis BT has been as bold over distribution technology as the content itself for its sport channels, but then it had to be given Sky’s entrenched position in sports rights in the UK. BT Sport succeeded in at least ruffling Sky’s feathers and arguably making serious inroads firstly by biting into the English Premier League pie and …
Faultline, 05 May 2016

X-IO and Pivot3 talks stall

Talks between X-IO and Pivot3 about IP licensing, engineering services and potential X-IO staff moving to Pivot3 have stalled. X-IO has been talking to Pivot3 and other companies about providing staff, IP, engineering services and other things such as product supply as a result of deciding to refocus its efforts away from …
Chris Mellor, 04 May 2016
IBM_FlashSystem_V9000

IBM's FlashSystem looks flashy enough, but peek under the hood...

Storage Architect This week IBM announced three new flash products, two of which are based on existing technology. Mainframe/Power customers got the all-flash DS8888, with the A9000 and A9000R models covering the rest of the market. What’s interesting about these latter two products is that they are based on Spectrum Accelerate, otherwise …
Chris Evans, 03 May 2016

Venezuela tops world lightning conductor league

Venezuela's Lake Maracaibo has wrested the world's "maximum lightning activity" crown from Africa's Congo Basin, according to electrifying data from the joint NASA and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Using 16 years of detection data from the now-deceased TRMM satellite's …
Lester Haines, 03 May 2016
Nerd fail photo via Shutterstock

Who you callin' stoopid? No excuses for biz intelligence's poor stats

Business Intelligence (BI) systems are designed to turn raw data into useful information, so why don’t they do the job properly? Why do most of them fail so completely to make use of the huge range of capabilities that the analytics world has to offer? Even at the most basic level, they fail catastrophically to take simple …
Mark Whitehorn, 02 May 2016
Telstra pit by https://www.flickr.com/photos/newtown_grafitti/ cc. 20 attribution generic https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Telstra wants to become the Uber of Telstra

Telstra wants to become the Uber of Telstra. CEO Andrew Penn today said, at an investor day, that customer experience is a core concern for the company's future. The carrier's customers don't benchmark Telstra against other telcos, he said, but agains the likes of Uber and Airnbnb. Telstra's therefore going to use those …
Simon Sharwood, 01 May 2016
whitehall road in London. <a href="http://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-637816p1.html?cr=00&pl=edit-00">Albert Pego</a> / <a href="http://www.shutterstock.com/editorial?cr=00&pl=edit-00">Shutterstock.com</a>

Central gov spent £6.3bn on IT. Nearly half handed to just 3 suppliers

Central government splashed £6.3bn with IT suppliers for the year 2014/15 – with 42 per cent going to just three suppliers, according to government data shared with The Register. Sixty-five per cent of the total figure was hoovered up by 10 suppliers, with HP coming top at £1.2bn, followed by Capgemini at £861m, and BT at £ …
Kat Hall, 29 Apr 2016
Geometric_Objects

No objections to object stores: Everyone's going smaller and faster

A couple of weeks ago I published an article about high performance object storage. Reactions have been quite diverse. Some think that object stores can only be huge and slow and then others who think quite the opposite. In fact, they can also be fast and small. In the last year I’ve had a lot of interesting conversations with …
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Linux greybeards release beta of systemd-free Debian fork

The effort to create a systemd-free Debian fork has borne fruit, with a beta of “Devuan Jessie” appearing in the wild. Devuan came into being after a rebellion by a self-described “Veteran Unix Admin collective” argued that Debian had betrayed its roots and was becoming too desktop-oriented. The item to which they objected …
Simon Sharwood, 29 Apr 2016
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There's more to life than Windows

When you run a corporate IT infrastructure, the chances are you run Active Directory underpinning a predominantly Windows-based array of servers, desktops and laptops. And that's fine: it probably serves 90 per cent of the kit you have and is a secure, easy-to-use way of authenticating user logins. But it's very unusual to …
Dave Cartwright, 28 Apr 2016
IBM_FlashSystem_900

IBM bungs deduplication in FlashSystem arrays

IBM launched three new all-flash array products, including an all-flash DS8888 monolithic array. It says the three products each have a minimum latency of 250 microseconds, and use IBM's proprietary format flash drives, called MicroLatency modules. Big Blue says the MicroLatency technology transfers data within the flash …
Chris Mellor, 28 Apr 2016
NBN Logo

Sure, let's build the NBN with technology that's not proven at scale

Comment Internet Australia's new National Broadband Network (NBN) policy advocates using a technology yet to be proven to work at scale. The organisation last week decided to update its policy from one I surmise as “never compromise: only fibre-to-the-premises will do” to advocating fibre-to-the-distribution-point (FTTDP) rollout as …
Simon Sharwood, 27 Apr 2016

Microsoft fingered for Western Euro PC tragedy

Microsoft last year effectively murdered one part of the mobile PC market that was going gangbusters - Windows with Bing (WwB) - and unsurprisingly this is now reflected in weaker sales across Western Europe. The low-cost WwB portables reached distributors by summer '14, designed to counter what was seen as a growing threat to …
Paul Kunert, 27 Apr 2016
St Petersburg Russia

SpyEye duo behind bank-account-emptying malware banged up

A two-man team responsible for spreading the SpyEye malware that caused more than a billion dollars in financial hardship is now starting extended sentences in American prisons. The malware's author – Aleksandr Panin, 27, of Tver, Russia – was sent down for nine years and six months by United States District Court Judge Amy …
Iain Thomson, 21 Apr 2016
ubuntu 16.04 beta GNOME software

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS arrives today complete with forbidden ZFS

Canonical will today (April 21st) launch version 16.04 of its Ubuntu Linux distribution, Xenial Xerus, the new long-term-support version of the project. As the name suggests, long-term support versions of Ubuntu get, er, long-term support, a guaranteed five years from today to be precise. The Xenial Xerus will therefore be …
Simon Sharwood, 21 Apr 2016

Magnitude malvertisers spew 400 attacks from abused Scot ad firm

Malwarebytes researcher Jerome Segura says more than 400 malicious advertisements have been shipped through ad network AdsTerra in two weeks. The advertisements are slinging the hugely successful Magnitude exploit kit which has been the most impactful and prolific of exploit kits used in recent malvertising campaigns. Emails …
Darren Pauli, 21 Apr 2016

Ex-NSA security expert develops generic Mac ransomware blocker

An Apple security expert has developed a free-of-charge standalone ransomware defense tool for OS X. Patrick Wardle, a former NSA staffer who now heads up research at crowdsourced security intelligence firm Synack, has built RansomWhere?, a generic ransomware detector. The utility works by suspending untrusted processes that …
John Leyden, 20 Apr 2016
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Official: EU goes after Google, alleges it uses Android to kill competition

The EU's competition authority thinks it has a smoking gun against Google. Consumers suffered because Google’s contracts with phone OEMs prevented the market from creating a better Android, the EU Commission alleged today. It has sent a formal Statement of Objections to Google that forces Google to come up with remedies or …
Andrew Orlowski, 20 Apr 2016
Daisywheel with Courier font

IBM expands Ustream

I stream, you stream, so IBM's upgrading Ustream. Big Blue's adding content delivery chops to its Ustream suite, which it acquired in January 2016. The Ustream eCDN (enterprise content distribution network) software is designed to sit behind the firewall, handling the caching and on-network distribution of video from a single …

Europe's digi-boss tells YouTube to cough up proper music royalties

The European Union's digital chief has told YouTube that it needs to start compensating copyright owners properly. Andrus Ansip is currently updating Europe's copyright rules and spoke publicly about how the Google-owned video site was providing far less to copyright owners than competing services such as Spotify. "This is …
Kieren McCarthy, 19 Apr 2016
Monty Python sketch: Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition

All-Python malware nasty bites Windows victims in Poland

Malware authors have put together a strain of malicious code written entirely in Python, in what may turn out to be an experiment in creating a new type of cross-platform nasty. PWOBot is written entirely in Python, and compiled via PyInstaller to generate a Microsoft Windows executable. The malware has already infected a …
John Leyden, 19 Apr 2016
Google faces antitrust charges in the European Union

So you’d sod off to China to escape the EU, Google? Really?

Analysis Google structures its entire organisation to avoid privacy laws, minimise taxes and de-risk itself from competition oversight*. Today Google’s European supremo hinted that being in China might be less of a hassle, and that losing Google would serve us Europeans right for being so backward. Of course, it’s a sheer coincidence …
Andrew Orlowski, 19 Apr 2016

Gartner's broken out its crystal ball again. Huawei's object storage bods won't be happy

Comment Gartner's gurus have ranked the top twelve object storage suppliers in a Critical Capabilities report, with Cleversafe at the top and Huawei last. The report states: "Object storage is pervasive as the underlying platform for cloud applications that we consume in our personal lives, such as content streaming, photo sharing and …
Chris Mellor, 18 Apr 2016

Music's value gap? Follow the money trail back to Google

Analysis If you want to understand the economics of the music industry, imagine that you make wellies: Prestige Boots. They’re excellent wellies, well reviewed and loved by customers. You deserve to crack the big time, so you arrange a meeting with Hypothetical Hypermarkets. In his swanky office, the Hypermarket buyer tells you how …
Andrew Orlowski, 14 Apr 2016
Cloudy sky

Redmond turns to Linux AGAIN for Azure data science primer

Microsoft has taken a data science bundle it crafted last November and put it onto an Azure-hosted Linux VM. The combo, announced at Microsoft's Cortana blog, takes CentOS 7.2, runs it up as an Azure virtual machine image, and packages it with a slew of data science tools. Microsoft had already run up a Windows Server 2012- …
Pic of Amazon's cloud booth in Hanover, Germany, Pic by drserg/shutterstock, for editorial use only

High performance object storage: Not just about reskinning Amazon's S3

Comment There are three tiers of storage: Primary storage, or block; secondary storage, or file; and object storage comes third. Object storage is immensely scalable, cheaper, durable... and slooooow. Could that be changing soon? Let me talk about on-premises object storage here. Many end users start with an application (sync and …

Bug hype haters gonna hate hate hate: Badlock flaw more like Sadlock

The Badlock flaw in Windows and Samba file servers has been revealed after weeks of hype and anticipation. It is not as critical as feared, but it's still an annoyance. Fixes and mitigations are available today. In late March, we were alerted to what was described as a "crucial security bug" in Windows and Unix-flavored SMB …
Chris Williams, 12 Apr 2016
World View's balloon in space

Cloudian's classier object storage management

Cloudian has lowered the management burden for its S3-compatible HyperStore object storage with automated this, predictive that, and dynamic, pro-active, non-disruptive other stuff. Michael Tso, Cloudian CEO and cofounder, said in a piece of canned quotery: "HyperStore 6.0 automates the whole data management and protection …
Chris Mellor, 12 Apr 2016
Richard Stallman

Bundling ZFS and Linux is impossible says Richard Stallman

Free Software Foundation president and Gnu Public Licence (GNU GPL) author Richard Stallman has weighed in on the spat over whether Ubuntu can legally include ZFS in Linux, with a resounding “No!” Stallman has issued a statement he says “.... explains some issues about the meaning and enforcement of the GNU General Public …
Simon Sharwood, 12 Apr 2016
Porsche_964_Turbo

You keep using that word – NVMe. Does it mean what I think it means?

Tech explainer NVMe fabric technology is a form of block-access storage networking that gets rid of network latency delays, magically making external flash arrays as fast as internal, directly-attached, NVMe flash drives. How does it manage this trick? EMC DSSD VP for software engineering, Mike Shapiro, defines NVMe fabrics as: "the new NVM …
Chris Mellor, 11 Apr 2016

Tor bakes links into apps

The Tor Project's new API will make it easier to embed secure links in apps. "GetTor" is Tor's effort to help people get around censorship in the world's more oppressive regimes. Described here, enhancements to GetTor's API include improved code, new channels and providers, and a new API. The RESTful API allows other …
Hannibal Lector wearing mask

If only hackers could stop slurping test and dev databases. Wait, our phone is ringing ...

Exposure and loss of sensitive data is happening everywhere these days. One attack surface, as the jargon has it, is sensitive production data used in internal testing and development systems. Delphix reckons it can secure this surface, and in the process remove time-consuming layers of security-checking bureaucracy that slows …
Chris Mellor, 08 Apr 2016

Dropping 1,000 cats from 32km: How practical is that?

Our report yesterday into NASA's high-altitude, heavy-lift super pressure balloon (SPB) mission - lofted by a stadium-sized sandwich bag and weighing in at 1,000 cats - prompted the traditional provocative reader input. First up, since the SPB's orb is crafted from 22 acres of polyethylene film, swelling to a whopping 516,499 …
Lester Haines, 08 Apr 2016

Google to admins: We'll tell you when your network is pwned

Google software engineer Nav Jagpal says it will start sharing URLs linked to social engineering, unwanted and malicious software, to help network administrators understand the threats they face. Google is monitoring some 22,000 autonomous systems (ASNs) or about 40 percent of total active networks, and provides some 250 …
Team Register, 08 Apr 2016
No junk mail. Pic: gajman, Flickr

Mumblehard spam-spewing botnet floored

Security researchers have teamed up with authorities in Ukraine to take down a spam-spewing Linux-infesting botnet. Security firm ESET teamed up with CyS-CERT and the Cyber Police of Ukraine to take down the Mumblehard botnet. A year ago, ESET analyzed the Mumblehard botnet, which was made up of thousands of infected Linux …
John Leyden, 07 Apr 2016
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Exertis slurps wireless distie Siracom

One of the UK’s bulkiest tech distributors Exertis has piled on a few more pounds by acquiring wireless infrastructure and security minnow Siracom for an undisclosed sum. Siracom, which also has offices in beautiful Basingstoke, sells products and services from vendors including Samsung, Fortinet and a bunch of lesser knowns. …
Paul Kunert, 07 Apr 2016
The two Wicked Lasers fired up

Turbo-charged quantum crypto? You'll need Cambridge laser boffins for that

Boffins hope to turbo-charge the speed of “unbreakable” quantum cryptographic systems with a new technique involving “seeding” one laser beam inside another. Researchers from the University of Cambridge and Toshiba Research Europe have used the technique to demonstrate that it might be possible to distribute encryption keys at …
John Leyden, 06 Apr 2016

Homeland Security report hoses down energy-sector 'cybergeddon' talk

+Comment Everybody knows how easily the world could be plunged into a New Dark Ages with nothing more than a handful of hacker keystrokes – everybody except the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS). In a report obtained and published by Public Intelligence researchers, the DHS contradicts most of the received wisdom …
ClusterStor_L300_bezel_detail

Seagate joins hands with Intel, adds tasty IEEL to its pie and mash

Seagate is helping to unify the Lustre parallel file system software world by incorporating Intel Enterprise Edition for Lustre (IEEL) into its ClusterStor arrays. Lustre is open source parallel file system software based on Linux, and some 40 per cent of the world’s fastest installed supercomputers use it. Seagate has its …
Chris Mellor, 05 Apr 2016
Doctor Who – The Zygon Invasion. Pic credit: BBC

The BBC flashes £560m ICT deal at hungry tech suppliers

The BBC has once again opened its wallet and is enticing suppliers to bid for a £560m ICT and hosting contract – part of its plans to replace its mega £2bn Atos contract. Over the next eight years it expects to splash between £400m and £560m on the deal, via a "single contracting entity" for end user compute services, hosting …
Kat Hall, 05 Apr 2016
Oculus Rift

Waiting for your Oculus to arrive? Yeah, it's going to be some time

Early purchasers of the new Oculus are going to have wait to get their hands on it thanks to an unexplained delivery delay. The product's launch last week was timed to coincide with its shipment to customers who have paid $599 for the virtual reality headset. But when a few days later nothing arrived in the mail, users started …
Iain Thomson, 04 Apr 2016
Canada's CHIME Telescope

Canada's CHIME telescope taps AMD for GPU-based super

Canada's under-construction CHIME telescope has taken a big step towards completion, announcing a contract that will put in place the high performance computing it needs. And AMD is over the moon about it: in line with the Canadian telescope's hope to use consumer-derived technology wherever possible, the project has anointed …
Space, image via shutterstock

Microsoft smells Musk, splashes on 'Mune' space program

Microsoft has filed a preliminary trademark application for “Mune,” spearheading an Amazon and SpaceX-like private space program. The trademark is described as: “Liquid propellant-fired projectile technology for orbital location of modular data distribution components. Trademark applications are much less detailed than patent …
Team Register, 01 Apr 2016
The Hollow Crown

How NoSQL graph databases still usurp relational dynasties

Analysis Despite being assaulted from all sides, the relational model for databases is still the king of the hill and it looks like it will not only survive, but thrive as well. NoSQL databases have become increasingly popular and have been offering a number of data and deployment modes that have overcome the limitations – real or …
Andrew Cobley, 29 Mar 2016
apple music

Streaming now outsells downloads – Recording Industry Ass. of America

Last year, revenues from streaming music topped those of paid downloads for the first time ever. This according to a fresh report [PDF] from the Recording Industry Ass. of America (RIAA), tracking revenues reported by US record labels. The RIAA says that during the year, streaming music revenues accounted for just over one- …
Shaun Nichols, 23 Mar 2016

Reposting 8-second sports clips infringes copyright

The High Court of England and Wales has ruled against an app developer who encouraged users to post eight-second sports clips under the guise that it was a social network. Mr Justice Arnold rejected the defence offered by Fanatix developer Will Muirhead that he could avoid infringement using either a fair use defence or a user …
Andrew Orlowski, 22 Mar 2016
Toshiba_flash_fabs

Toshiba storage keeps eye on flash as Group sheds jobs, sells divisions

Toshiba is doubling down on flash memory as a revenue growth engine to help climb out of the financial poo, while also aiming to get dollars spinning out of its disk drive business. In a reconstruction plan revealed on Friday, the troubled Japanese tech giant said it would develop its 3D memory products faster and develop …
Chris Mellor, 22 Mar 2016
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Gov to take axe to big IT contracts soon, will hand chunks to SMEs

Chief executive of the civil service, John Manzoni, has promised the government will start chopping up its big IT contracts in the next year and kick its dependency on just a handful of suppliers. Amyas Morse, auditor general at the National Audit Office, told the Public Accounts Committee yesterday that 51 per cent of …
Kat Hall, 22 Mar 2016

IETF group proposes better SMTP hardening to secure email. At last

Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP), that staple of e-mail communications, was born in an era when nobody thought the Internet needed security. While extensions have been written since to fix this – the most important is STARTTLS – there remains a problem: STARTTLS doesn't yet guarantee either message confidentiality or proof …