Articles about Contracts

IBM Selectric Golfball

AT&T's spying millions

The Project Hemisphere spying business run by AT&T, which sells customer phone logs to the police, is raking in millions for the telco. Invoices leaked to the Daily Beast show that numerous police forces are handing hundreds of thousands of dollars to AT&T in exchange for the call times, recipients, and locations of caller …
Iain Thomson, 25 Oct 2016
1960s edition of the country house murder mystery game Cluedo or Clue - Patented in the UK by John Waddington Games in 1947 - illustrative. By SamJonah, via shutterstock. editorial use only

Murder in the Library of Congress

The US Copyright Office has been given a brutal Silicon Valley-style sacking, the first time the Copyright Register has been dismissed in 119 years. Maria A Pallante was locked out of her computer on Friday, according to Billboard, on the instructions of her boss, a new Obama appointee, Carla Hayden, the Librarian of Congress …
Andrew Orlowski, 24 Oct 2016

Cabinet Office gears up to ink mega Oracle deal

The Cabinet Office is gearing up to ink another mega pan-government Oracle licensing deal, multiple sources have told The Register. One person close to the matter told us: "Government is supposed to be moving away from big monopolies by big companies, especially expensive ones that operate bully behaviour like Oracle. "Yet it …
Kat Hall, 24 Oct 2016
The British Pound - Sterling currency tumbles post Brexit

Computacenter Q3 numbers lifted by weak British Pound

The weak British pound worked in Computacenter’s favour during its calendar Q3, as the conversion of Euros generated by ops in mainland Europe helped to lift group revenues and offset “softness” in the UK. The London-listed firm reported a two per cent year-on-year rise in turnover to £735m, more than £400m of which was …
Paul Kunert, 21 Oct 2016

Who killed Cyanogen?

Analysis Does European Commissioner for Competition Margrethe Vestager's team pay close attention to the tech news? If not, perhaps they should. Last week there was barely a murmur after Cyanogen Inc scaled back its ambitions. “Throwing in the towel” may be harsh – but the Android software company said it would henceforth be trying to …
Andrew Orlowski, 19 Oct 2016

The UK's 'Universal Credit mega cockup was the coalition's NPfIT' - Margaret Hodge

When Margaret Hodge was appointed chair of the UK Parliament's Public Accounts Committee in 2010, she was the first Labour leader since 1997 – as its head is always drawn from the main opposition party. In 2015 her colleague Meg Hillier became the new PAC chair, with all indications so far suggesting her successor will also be …
Kat Hall, 14 Oct 2016
snapshot of postgres vision panel discussion

Oracle DB admins urged to swap their gas guzzler for an electric car

Postgres Vision At the Postgres Vision 16 conference taking place in San Francisco this week, Ed Boyajian, president and CEO of EnterpriseDB, tried to convince attendees to abandon their Hummers for electric cars. Boyajian wasn't moonlighting for Tesla. Rather, he was peddling a metaphor in which expensive gas-guzzlers represent traditional …
Thomas Claburn, 13 Oct 2016
Giant burger

Burger barn put cloud on IT menu, burned out its developers

In Australia fast-food history played out differently to the rest of the world and the nation no longer has Burger King. So when you want a Whopper down under you head to a chain called “Hungry Jack's” that is pretty much a BK clone. We mention the burger barn because Vulture South today encountered its CIO Bruce Nolte, who …
Simon Sharwood, 12 Oct 2016
Vodafone Smart Ultra 7 . From vodafone uk website

There are some really crap budget phones out there. Vodafone's Smart Ultra 7 isn't

Review Not so long ago, the idea of buying an operator-branded phone would have filled most people with horror. For years these were typically budget feature phones for skint punters, too time-poor to do their own homework. Vodafone Smart Ultra 7 . From vodafone uk website But then a couple of years ago, EE introduced its Kestrel, …
Andrew Orlowski, 11 Oct 2016
Desktop as a service

No, software-as-a-service won't automatically simplify operations and cut costs

Software-as-a-service (SaaS) is sold to line of business people as a way to get the applications they need, without all the hassle, time and expense required to have an IT department build and run an application. But while off-the-shelf SaaS can do an awful lot for a business, doing SaaS well needs ancillary tools that SaaS …
Simon Sharwood, 11 Oct 2016
Snow White waves goodbye. Photo copyright Disney

Disney aims for Netflix. If the deal was made, it would shoot itself in the foot

Analysis People that invest in Netflix and people that invest in Disney should never meet each other – they would not get on. But it seems there is a danger, according to the Wall Street Journal, that the two shall be thrown together in an unholy Alliance. While we can totally see the logic of such a deal, and how theoretically it …
Faultline, 10 Oct 2016
Apple iPhone 6s

French programmers haul Apple into court over developer rules

Nexedi, an open source software company based in France, has filed a lawsuit against Apple in Paris alleging that Apple's App Store contract is unfair. In a blog post, founder and CEO Jean-Paul Smets and UI designer Sven Franck said that the company has undertaken the lawsuit to force Apple to improve its support for the …
Thomas Claburn, 07 Oct 2016

Lenovo grabs spotlight, hunts for sales uplift after server build shift

Lenovo claimed it has yet to feel the commercial benefit of putting local server assembly into the hands of a contract manufacturer in Europe because the market has “tanked” - the cloud saw to that, an exec has said. The Chinese firm shifted rack and tower production to Flextronics in Hungary from May and will move over more …
Paul Kunert, 07 Oct 2016

Breaking compression, one year at a time

Sysadmin Blog Computers physically last a lot longer than vendors would like. The idea of the three-year refresh cycle is considered sacred amongst a certain crowd, but when pressed most will admit that refreshes of that nature are exceptionally rare. While we can keep equipment running for a decade or beyond, there are hidden issues in doing …
Trevor Pott, 07 Oct 2016
Penguins in mist, photo via Shutterstock

Hyperledger chain gang man explains Penguins' blockchain play

LinuxCon, Berlin Jim Zemlin raises an eyebrow when I say Hyperledger is rather outside Linux Foundation's usual domain, being a bit, er, consumery. “It’s totally enterprise,” the Foundation's executive director tells me. “It’s infrastructure.” Just like Linux, he reckons. Hyperledger is the layer above the operating system, above Linux. Linux …
Gavin Clarke, 06 Oct 2016
A tortoise catches an orange frisbee. Photo by Shutterstock

Mobile data is getting slower, faster

US cities have seen a massive crash in LTE data speeds this year - but consumers haven’t noticed as latencies are getting lower. According to TwinPrime’s State of Mobile Performance, T-Mobile has emerged as the fastest mobile operator in the US and many European countries. The survey also shows Europe continues to enjoy faster …
Andrew Orlowski, 06 Oct 2016

BlackBerry: You can't just roll up and make one

Interview BlackBerry says it won’t license its brand and security hardened Android “to any Tom Dick and Harry” as it tries to maintain the value of its brand. The BlackBerry senior VP for sales for its Mobility division Alex Thurber - stopping to talk to El Reg as he sailed through London on his honeymoon - also told us BlackBerry had …
Andrew Orlowski, 05 Oct 2016

Parliamentary watchdog: Bank IT concerns not yet addressed

Concerns about the security and resilience of bank IT systems have not yet been addressed, a prominent MP has said in a letter to UK regulators. Andrew Tyrie, chairman of the Treasury Committee in the UK House of Commons, asked Andrew Bailey (4-page / 215KB PDF), chief executive of the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), and …
OUT-LAW.COM, 05 Oct 2016
Man shouting the news from a rolled up newspaper

Oops: Carphone burps up new Google phone details

Google executives have been hyping tomorrow’s Android event as the most significant since the platform was first announced in 2008. But there’s little need to tune in for one part of it, thanks to British mobile phone retailer Carphone Warehouse. Google plans to use the event to take a more prominent role as a phone maker, all …
Andrew Orlowski, 03 Oct 2016
Sad Android

EU turns screws on Android – report

Barring a last minute deal, the European Commission is set to impose a swingeing fine for Google parent Alphabet’s anti-competitive behaviour in Europe, with specific terms addressing its control over Android in contracts with phone-makers. The details come via Reuters’ Foo Yun Chee, a regular and reliable source on DG-COMP. …
Andrew Orlowski, 03 Oct 2016

FCC keeps secret Google TV landgrab under wraps forever

Analysis US broadband regulator the FCC dramatically cancelled the much-anticipated vote on its secretive TV set-top box plan on Thursday – and it's keeping the details confidential. The terse note announcing the cancellation of the vote [PDF] at the ironically named “Open Meeting” declared that: The item remains on circulation and …
Andrew Orlowski, 30 Sep 2016
Cables containing fibre, etc. Photo by Shutterstock

Business to be given more scope to quit crap broadband contracts

UK businesses are to receive more accurate data on broadband speeds before signing up to a contract, under a voluntary code coming into force from Ofcom today. Under the move, customers will also be able to exit their contract at any point if speeds fall below a minimum guaranteed level. The plans are to be run under a …
Kat Hall, 30 Sep 2016
A skull atop money

Termination fees for terminated people now against the law

The US state of New York has had to pass a law to stop telcos and utility companies from charging fees to the deceased. Governor Andrew Cuomo said that bill A.8630A /S.6485-A, signed into effect earlier this week, will impose a $1,000 fine to any phone, internet, cable, or power operator that attempts to charge a recently …
Shaun Nichols, 30 Sep 2016

Computacenter's former 'unsung hero' rocks up at Redcentric

Former Computacenter exec Mo Siddiqui has landed at managed services provider Redcentric as chief operating officer, transferring his experience of working with large corporate clients to his new employer. Siddiqui left the services-based reseller in July after almost 20 years on board, latterly as international director. He …
Paul Kunert, 29 Sep 2016

FCC death vote looms for the Golden Age of American TV

Special report We’re living in a “Golden Age of TV”, and the United States makes the most envied popular TV drama in the world. Breaking Bad, The Sopranos and The Wire raised the bar for everyone in TV drama. More cash is invested in content: last year Netflix alone spent more on shows than either the BBC or HBO. It takes more risks and …
Andrew Orlowski, 29 Sep 2016

Ever seen a storage startup and thought: 'Pshaw. I could do that?'

Part One You read The Register about people getting ahead with the most ridiculous startup ideas and ask: "Why that can't be you?" How is the game played? Well, let's design a storage startup from scratch and find out. I'm picking storage as the market for my hypothetical startup in part because I have worked closely with a number of …
Trevor Pott, 29 Sep 2016
Detroit skyline

City of Detroit's IT boss took payola from tech suppliers, now faces jail

The head of IT for the city of Detroit, Michigan, has admitted taking bribes from a pair of tech contractors. Charles L. Dodd, 46, trousered $29,500 for helping to award deals to two companies that were trying to avoid losing work through city cutbacks. After Dodd pulled the right strings and accepted the payola, the pair of …
Shaun Nichols, 28 Sep 2016
editorial only image of Whitehall. Pic Daniel Gale/Shutterstock is doing sod all to break £20bn of locked-in IT contracts

Analysis If IT wasn't perceived to be such a boring topic by Joe Public, the amount the government still spends on expensive clunky technology would be viewed as a national scandal. Across the entire public sector the annual figure has been pegged at around £20bn. No one knows for sure. As long as Whitehall's money is locked into …
Kat Hall, 28 Sep 2016

Google, Dropbox the latest US tech giants to sign up to the Privacy Shield

Internet giant Google has signed up to the Privacy Shield, a framework designed to facilitate the transfer of personal data between the EU and US by businesses. Data storage and software provider Dropbox has also self-certified under the Privacy Shield. The companies are the latest major US technology businesses to sign up to …
OUT-LAW.COM, 28 Sep 2016

Did last night's US presidential debate Wi-Fi rip-off break the law?

The host of the first presidential debate on Monday night, Hofstra University in New York, may have broken the law and could be in line for a huge fine. Reporters at the event were appalled to find that among the heavily marked-up items they were offered – $150 to rent a lamp, anyone? – was a $200 charge for a "secure wireless …
Kieren McCarthy, 27 Sep 2016

Don't let banks fool you, the blockchain really does have other uses

Analysis It is a truth universally acknowledged that executives in the financial sector are capable of making the most exciting innovations boring, and in this respect their approach to the blockchain has been exemplary. During 2008's financial crash, a nine-page paper titled Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System [PDF] was …
Photo by GongTo / Shutterstock

US Labor Dept accuses CIA-backed Palantir of discriminating against Asian engineers

America's favourite Big Brother-backed unicorn, Palantir Technologies, is being sued by the US Department of Labor (DoL) for alleged discrimination against Asian job applicants. Announcing the lawsuit, the DoL says it wants to “end the company’s alleged discriminatory hiring policies and practices.” The department has the …
Fibre, image via Shutterstock

Watch out, Openreach: CityFibre swallows Redcentric's network for £5m

Plucky Openreach challenger CityFibre has gobbled £5m worth of service provider Redcentric’s network - adding 137km of fibre to the upstart’s network. The deal will extend CityFibre’s growth by three more cities to 40, a move it reckons positions it as an "increasingly powerful national competitor to BT Openreach.” The biz …
Kat Hall, 26 Sep 2016

The Great British domain name rip-off: Overcharged .uk customers help pay for cheaper .vodka

UK domain name holders are being overcharged while the company behind it wins contracts by undercutting the market in what may be illegal market abuse. In recent months, Nominet has signed a number of contracts with commercial operators of dozens of internet extensions ranging from .boston to .vodka. More deals are in the …
Kieren McCarthy, 26 Sep 2016

Winners and losers: Here's who made the cut for mega TP2 framework

A public sector contracts fat cat and some household PC brands are among the suppliers that failed to directly win a place on a mega pan-government hardware and software framework contract, according to a preliminary list seen by The Register. The Technology Products (TP) 2 agreement, worth up to £4bn over four years, is due …
Paul Kunert, 23 Sep 2016
IT Crowd's Roy: "Have you turned it off and on again?"

Sysadmin gets 5 years for slurping contractor payments to employer

A 49-year-old IT bloke from Essex has been sentenced to five years' imprisonment on two counts of fraud after his cunning plan to steal £450,000 from his employer was uncovered... almost immediately. Adeshola Dada, of Watts Crescent, Purfleet, Essex, was employed in the IT department of Genesis Housing Association, where he …
Red Hard Hat photo via Shutterstock

Big biz happy to whip out credit cards for pay-as-you-go – Red Hat

Analysis Linux and open-source cloud supremo Red Hat is looking at adapting its licensing to please enterprise customers who want greater flexibility in the way they pay for software and services, including a possible pay-as-you-go model. The move was mooted by chief executive Jim Whitehurst during a conference call for Red Hat’s Q2 …
Dan Robinson, 22 Sep 2016

A Clarity cloud gathers around K2. Yes, literally

Unlike real clouds which hide things, Kaminario is adding a Clarity analytics cloud to its K2 all-flash arrays. It’s a set of array management and monitoring functionalities that send data to a Kaminario data centre where application-level intelligence, machine learning and big data analytics are used to get the arrays working …
Chris Mellor, 21 Sep 2016
A cursor hovers over a Run/Save/Cancel dialog menu.

Are you sure you want to outsource IT? Yes/No. Check this box to accept Ts&Cs

Migrating to an outsourced IT service including cloud is a great opportunity to outsource responsibility for IT and employees while simultaneously increasing efficiency and decreasing cost. At least, that’s the theory. The reality can be a lot more sobering. The SSP outage should serve as a reminder that while cloud can be …
Frank Jennings, 21 Sep 2016

Wow, RIP hackers ... It's Cyber-Lord Blunkett to the rescue for UK big biz

A high-profile project has been launched with the aim of strengthening UK enterprises' IT security. The Cyber Highway was launched in London on Tuesday by Lord David Blunkett. The resource offers a “user-friendly online portal for large enterprises that want to strengthen the cyber defence of their supply chain.” Corporations …
John Leyden, 21 Sep 2016
Sheaf of £50 notes poised on the rim of a toilet bowl as toilet is flushed. Collage of two photos sourced from Shutterstock

Margaret Hodge's book outlines 'mind boggling' UK public sector waste

Review It’s impossible to read former bollocker-in-chief Margaret Hodge’s account of being chair of the government's spending watchdog without repeatedly banging your head against the wall. Hodge presided over the House of Commons’ Public Accounts Committee between 2010-2015, during the coalition government’s austerity programme. …
Kat Hall, 20 Sep 2016
Oracle's cloud plan

Spoiler alert: What Oracle is going to announce today

OpenWorld It's that time of the year again. Oracle's OpenWorld is in San Francisco. Supremo Larry Ellison has given his Sunday keynote. Here's a summary of what the database giant is going to reveal today in easily digestible chunks. And, yeah, warning: everything is now cloud. Anything you'd call an application or a software service is …
Chris Williams, 19 Sep 2016 oughta get its data-sharing house in order before Digital Economy Bill plans

Analysis The government has a funny notion of how to tackle failure. When it comes to contracts, suppliers that have routinely messed up are handed more deals. When it comes to policy, approaches that have proved unsuccessful get dusted off and pushed with renewed vigour. The author who wrote "the definition of insanity is doing the …
Kat Hall, 19 Sep 2016
EU flag photo via Shutterstock

Brexit will happen. The EU GDPR will happen. You can't avoid either

Article 50, the process for Britain’s formal withdrawal from the European Union, is looming. Upon the conclusion of Article 50, data centres resident in Britain will no longer be subject to EU data protection rules. Today, UK data centres are bound by the EU Data Protection Directive (95/46/C), which was in turn based on the …
Danny Bradbury, 16 Sep 2016
Metropolitan police image via Shutterstock

'Inherent risk' to untried and untested 4G emergency services network – NAO

Plans for a new 4G emergency services network (ESN) to be used in life and death situations by the blue light services have been dubbed as "high risk," in a report from the National Audit Office today. The ESN will replace the expensive Airwave radio system used by the police, fire and ambulance services. It is expected to …
Kat Hall, 15 Sep 2016
Music kid image via Shutterstock

Songsmiths sue US antitrust over Google-friendly rules ruling

Two independent women songwriters are suing the US antitrust department of the Department of Justice over its proposal to rip up songwriters' contracts to make them more Google-friendly. Crucially, in the remarks, the DoJ proposes that both ASCAP and BMI must accept 100 per cent licensing – so Spotify and other giant music …
Andrew Orlowski, 14 Sep 2016

FCC defends cable box battle

Staff at the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) are pushing back against claims that the federal regulator is trying to control commercial contracts with its cable box plan. In a series of tweets Gigi Sohn, the person widely seen to be behind a raft of FCC proposals that clamp down on telco market abuse, criticized the …
Kieren McCarthy, 13 Sep 2016

It actually will be Obama who decides whether to end US government oversight of the internet

The decision whether to end US government oversight of the internet will likely come down to a personal decision by President Obama on Thursday. In an extraordinary series of arguments and counter-arguments this past week, a last-minute push by Republicans looks likely to succeed in placing a funding freeze on the Department …
Kieren McCarthy, 13 Sep 2016

Student charity's ex-IT boss in the cooler for stealing $1.3m through fake tech contracts

A former IT executive has been ordered to spend the next 45 months behind bars after he stole $1.3m from a charity in Virginia, US. Demetrius Arnold Washington, 51, of Louisa, must also pay back the mountain of dosh that he funneled into his pockets via bogus tech consultancies. He was jailed after pleading guilty to mail …
Shaun Nichols, 12 Sep 2016

Wait, wait – I got it this time, says FCC as it swings again at rip-off US TV cable boxes

US comms watchdog the FCC has published its revised plans to kill the multi-billion-dollar cable box rip-off. In a fact sheet [PDF], chair Tom Wheeler reiterates the same arguments he made back in January when he first proposed forcing cable companies to publish their data streams in an open format so competitors could offer …
Kieren McCarthy, 09 Sep 2016