Articles about Cloud Computing

'I'm innocent!' says IT contractor on trial after Office 365 bill row spiraled out of control

An IT contractor is facing criminal charges after turning off the Microsoft Office 365 service of a customer he said owed him money. Jim Kubicek, 48, of Cumming, Georgia, US, was arrested and charged with theft by extortion, computer theft, and computer trespass. He denies any wrongdoing, and told The Register: "I am innocent …
Shaun Nichols, 17 Feb 2017
Itanium_9500_die

Next Superdome CPU chips amble into HPE

There have been reports that Intel has already started shipping its latest, Kittson version, Itanium processor chip. The current Itanium processors are the 9500 series, code-named Poulson, and introduced in 2012. There are four versions: 9520, 9540, 9550 and 9560. HPE uses Itanium chips in its high-end Superdome 2 servers, …
Chris Mellor, 15 Feb 2017
Binary data/big data conceptual illustration. Illustration via Shutterstock

With nearly 1m users on its books, DigitalOcean touts load balancers

DigitalOcean on Tuesday plans to begin offering load balancers to help its customers distribute online traffic across their infrastructure, at a cost of $20 per month. Load balancers ensure that DigitalOcean servers can handle surges of online traffic and represent an essential safety mechanism for online businesses. They …
Thomas Claburn, 14 Feb 2017
Fast Cloud

Clouds can compete with HPC, say boffins

The best clouds are genuinely competitive with do-it-yourself high performance computing – and Microsoft's top-tier Azure is the best of the lot. That's the conclusion from research conducted by Mohammad Mohammadi and Timur Bazhirov of Exabyte and offered as a pre-print at Arxiv. The two boffins took a simple approach to …
StoreServ_racks

HPE brags its latest 3PAR OS shrinkwrapper better protects data

HPE says its latest 3PAR OS, v 3.3.1, has better data reduction, faster iSCI networking, upgraded data protection and an extra helping of automation to help admin staff. The Adaptive Data Reduction (ADR) feature can reduce capacity needs by up to 75 per cent*, it claims. It includes both in-line deduplication and compression, …
Chris Mellor, 13 Feb 2017

Another day, another cloud price cut – from partly free to all free

IBM has revealed that the standard tier Bluemix Lift service is now free. Which sounds great save for one small problem: the service was just about free already. Bluemix lift is a database migration service that Big Blue says “makes it easy to quickly, securely and reliably migrate your database from on-premises data centers …
Darren Pauli, 08 Feb 2017

Wow, what an incredible 12 months: 2017's data center year in review

Comment The data center market is hot, especially now that we are getting a raft of funky new stuff, from promising non-Intel chips and system architectures to power and cooling optimizations. Since we're all thinking several quarters ahead anyway, we're practically in 2018. So from that point of view, we may as well look back at 2017 …
Shahin Khan, 06 Feb 2017
Guy in shirt and tie visits the beach. wearing "beach business-casual". Photo by Shutterstock

Toss your day job. Start a backup company. Sorted

Analysis A conversation with Barracuda CEO BJ Jenkins revealed a company whose customers are heading steadily towards the cloud – where the full stack approaches of Dell, HPE and others can’t hold sway – and where Barracuda, natch, thinks it can grow and grow. As a reminder, the company reported revenues of around $90m in its latest …
Chris Mellor, 26 Jan 2017
Image by Ryger https://www.shutterstock.com/g/RYGER

Human bot hybrid finds LinkedIn email, phone number-filching holes

LinkedIn has shuttered five dangerous privacy holes that could have allowed users' phone numbers, email addresses and resumes to be downloaded, plus the deletion of all connection requests. The flaws, since patched, were found by the first human-bot hacking hybrid, the brainchild of Bangalore security boffin Rahul Sasi. Sasi …
Darren Pauli, 25 Jan 2017
china

China's Great Firewall to crack down on unofficial VPNs – state-approved net connections only

The Chinese government has started an 18-month crackdown that will require all VPN providers to seek government approval for their activities if they want to stay in business. The news, announced by the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology on Sunday, says that the market for services that bypass the content filters …
Iain Thomson, 23 Jan 2017
Bitcoin, photo via Shutterstock

SporeStack: Disposable, anonymous servers, via Bitcoin and Python

Hardware infrastructure, once the foundation of computing giants like IBM, has become an abstract commodity thanks to cloud computing, virtualization, and containerization. Through large service providers like Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform, or smaller ones like DigitalOcean, Linode, and Vultr …
Thomas Claburn, 19 Jan 2017

Inspur inspires DDN to be its HPC reseller

DDN has signed a deal for Inspur to sell tested and configured systems to worldwide HPC customers, using DDN storage alongside Inspur servers, networking, software and services. Inspur is the third of three main Chinese server and systems suppliers, the others being Huawei and Lenovo. It quotes Gartner stats to say it was the …
Chris Mellor, 18 Jan 2017
People fight in cartoon cloud. photo by Shutterstock

Speaking in Tech: Japan launches rocket with 2 laptops, 8 people

Podcast speaking_in_tech Greg Knieriemen podcast enterprise It's another episode of El Reg's weekly tech gabfest. Greg is wasting away in Amsterdam while Ed, Melissa and Peter steer the podcast this week to discuss CES 2017, SpaceX and cloud explosions. (00:00) Banter (00:56) Peter at CES (not really) and stolen Razer laptops ( …
Team Register, 18 Jan 2017
Oracle logo, image by GongTo via Shutterstock

Solaris 12 disappears from Oracle's roadmap

In late 2016, The Register received credible-but-ultimately-unverifiable reports that Oracle was scaling back Solaris development, perhaps with significant sackings. We chose not to publish because Oracle denied the specific allegations we'd received. We’re aware of rumours about the demise of Solaris. Our best efforts have …
Simon Sharwood, 18 Jan 2017

Well, that sucks: China's Tencent so sorry after vid emerges of faux blowjob office game

Video China's biggest internet biz Tencent has apologized after women employees were filmed on their knees in front of male coworkers in a raunchy end-of-year party game. Youtube Video The video shows two executives standing with water bottles between their legs, while two young female staff members attempt to unscrew the caps with …
Iain Thomson, 18 Jan 2017
Parliament photo by Shutterstock

Big tech's grip loosens on UK.gov IT spend

UK government IT spending is still dominated by a few big suppliers – but they are losing some of their grip, according to publicly released data and Freedom of Information responses covering five of the biggest-spending organisations. Last year, the Cabinet Office said the three biggest IT suppliers across central government …
SA Mathieson, 13 Jan 2017

AWS, you crack us up. Rebrands Westminster 'Webminster'

LogoWatch Confused commuters disembarked at Westminster tube this morning to discover the station at the seat of power had been rebranded "Webminster" in a "hilarious" guerilla marketing campaign by Amazon Web Services. The one-day rebrand is part of AWS's re:Start training programme intended to educate folk on the latest software …
Kat Hall, 12 Jan 2017

IBM filed another 8,000 patents in 2016

IBM’s lawyers were busy little bees last year, getting a shade more than 8,000 patent applications granted for Big Blue’s American brainboxes. IBM claims its inventors were granted an average of 22 patents per day in 2016, scoring a total of 8,088 patents. Of those patents, 2,700 were related to AI, cognitive computing and …
Gareth Corfield, 09 Jan 2017
Couple in snorkelling gear at the travel agents... Comedy snap. Photo by Shutterstock

Travel booking systems ‘wide open’ to abuse – report

Updated Legacy travel booking systems disclose travellers’ private information, security researchers warn. Travel bookings worldwide are maintained in a handful of Global Distributed Systems (GDS) built around mainframe computers linked to the web but without adequate security controls, say the researchers. “The systems have since …
John Leyden, 04 Jan 2017

What’s next after hyperconvergence?

So, you’ve had a crack at hyperconverged architecture. You’ve bought your cloud-in-a-box solution from Nutanix, VMware or whomever and tried it out on a pilot project - something manageable and discrete that didn’t interfere with the rest of your architecture too much. And now that you’ve dipped your toe in the water, you’d like …
Danny Bradbury, 15 Dec 2016
Canada datacenter

My name's Jeff B and I'm here to say: Canada's getting an AWS region around the way

If you're looking for somewhere to run your computing instances outside the Land of the FreeTM, then Amazon Web Services has an option for the Americas with its first Canada cloud computing region. Amazon claims the region has a minimum 9ms network latency to Toronto and New York, 14ms to Ottawa, and 60ms to Vancouver. The …
Iain Thomson, 08 Dec 2016
china

Microsoft, IBM, Intel refuse to hand over family jewels to China

Microsoft, IBM and Intel have given Chinese officials short shrift after the government demanded to see their top-secret source code and blueprints. Last month, the Middle Kingdom passed a tough cybersecurity law that will, among other things, require any technology company doing business in the Asian superpower to submit …
Iain Thomson, 02 Dec 2016

AWS CTO: 'I truly hated the relationship with software tool vendors'

AWS re:Invent Amazon Web Services turned its focus to developers in day two of its re:Invent conference in Las Vegas, kicking out a handful of new features designed to make life easier for those who develop and maintain cloud applications. CTO Werner Vogels said that the features, ranging from new analysis utilities to storage management …
Shaun Nichols, 01 Dec 2016
Amazon Web Services

Custom silicon, 9PB storage boxes, and 25Gb Ethernet – just another day in AWS hardware

AWS re:Invent AWS says it has moved into building its own silicon to help deliver the throughput for its massive cloud service. The profitable side of the Amazon empire says it has started using a custom-designed Annapurna ASIC chip to help control the networking activity – both physical and SDN – in its AWS servers. This is freeing up the …
Shaun Nichols, 30 Nov 2016

What you need to know from re:Invent – FPGAs-as-a-service and more

AWS re:Invent At its re:Invent conference in Las Vegas today, Amazon Web Services tipped its hand to reveal its battle plan for invading new markets. The Jeff Bezos cash machine has kicked out a laundry list of new services and virtual machine instances for AI applications, databases, and software that requires specialized hardware …
Shaun Nichols, 30 Nov 2016

Super Cali goes ballistic, considers taxing Netflix

More than 40 cities in California are considering a tax on streaming services – dubbed a Netflix tax – claiming that the tax system needs updating for the internet era. The news comes as AT&T announces a new streaming service, DirectTV Now, which the company hopes will see people discard their cable boxes altogether for over …
Kieren McCarthy, 28 Nov 2016
Don Draper is sad

I'm not having a VMware moment – there's just something in my eye

Analysis SAP VP Renu Raman thinks 2U, 24-drive, NVMe storage boxes could provoke a storage VMware moment. Raman looks after HANA cloud computing at SAP and his interests include high-performance persistence architecture for in-memory databases. What he's clocked is that there is storage hardware now in the same position as the 2U 2- …
Chris Mellor, 25 Nov 2016
Robots massed photo via Shutterstock

Dyn Dyn Dyn – we have a buyer: Oracle gobbles Internet of Things DDoS victim

Oracle is buying Dyn, the internet infrastructure outfit whose A-list customers were struck by a global DDoS from internet-attached "things" in October. The software giant is buying Dynamic Network Services (Dyn) to speed up cloud computing traffic. Financial terms were not disclosed Dyn's platform controls and optimises …
Gavin Clarke, 21 Nov 2016
China

Open sesame: Alibaba to open its first data centre in Europe

The cloudy arm of China's Amazon-equivalent Alibaba is opening its first data centre in Europe – part of the outfit's bid for global cloud domination. Alibaba Group is partnering with Vodafone Germany to co-locate Alibaba Cloud's first European data centre at Vodafone's data centre facilities in Frankfurt. The biz has also …
Kat Hall, 21 Nov 2016

AWS shines light on Virginia solar scheme

Amazon is planning to open five new solar power farms to help run its AWS cloud data centers. The five latest facilities will be located in Virginia and will feed electricity to the US East regional cloud centers in Virginia and Ohio. Amazon said the new panels will be set up in New Kent, Buckingham, Sussex, Powhatan, and …
Shaun Nichols, 18 Nov 2016

The solution to security breaches? Kill the human middleware

Versus16 It's a computer security truism that human beings are the biggest network threat. Sysadmins have always assumed that means users, but it may be time to take a long, hard look in the mirror. At the Versus conference in San Francisco on Thursday – a conference that its organizers say they set up to challenge the security status …
Kieren McCarthy, 17 Nov 2016
Man heaves giant rock above his head in the middle of the woods. Photo by Shutterstock

Facebook Telecom Infrastructure Project starts chucking rocks at mobile model

Analysis Nine months after announcing its Telecom Infrastructure Project (TIP), Facebook has held its first summit and unveiled new partners and a first concrete project, a white box transponder/router for fibre backhaul, called Voyager. This is an indication, if any were needed, that the social media giant was not just tub-thumping …
Wireless Watch, 17 Nov 2016
MRI SCANS. Photo by shutterstock

Everest outage was caused by split brains

Updated Server farm Everest''s blackout on 15 November was caused by a power outage combined with stacked routers each running different software versions. A "reason for outage" document issued by Everest admitted to there having been a "loss of connectivity" for clients using IP network services between 0830 and 1030 on 15 November …
Gareth Corfield, 17 Nov 2016
Cash register, photo via Shutterstock

AWS looks to add 'bill collector' to its list of cloud offerings

Amazon Web Services has opened a store that will allow customers to purchase additional software-as-a-service products and pay with their monthly AWS bill. The cloud giant says that the AWS Marketplace Vendors program will let cloud customers buy the additional services as needed, paying for time or data used rather than as a …
Shaun Nichols, 16 Nov 2016

Forget razors and blades, APIs are the new gotcha

Sysadmin Blog I've always hated the "razor and blades" business model. It pops up everywhere in our society, and is becoming ever more popular in IT. There is enough crossover with subscription models that it's hard to tell where one business model stops and the other begins. Regardless of the nuances, "razor and blades" is nothing but a tax …
Trevor Pott, 16 Nov 2016
Huawei_XH320_server_node

Huawei hots up its high-density server line

Huawei has a new X6000 model in its FusionServer line of server cartridges stacked inside a rack chassis. You may not see these much, if at all, in the US, but they will feature in the rest of the world. The Chinese company’s server range includes: KunLun and TaiShan mission-critical servers FusionCube hyper-converged …
Chris Mellor, 15 Nov 2016
shark

The sharks of AI will attack expensive and scarce workers faster than they eat drivers

Although sixty years old, artificial intelligence remained mostly a curiosity until half a decade ago, when IBM’s Watson trounced the world’s best Jeopardy! players in a televised match. At the time, you might have thought nothing of that - what does a game show matter in the scheme of things? It didn’t stop there. IBM sent …
Mark Pesce, 14 Nov 2016
Bank vault

What went wrong at Tesco Bank?

Tesco Bank has enlisted the help of the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) following the most serious cyber-attack launched against a UK bank. The attack against the supermarket giant's banking arm involved the theft of £2.5m from 9,000 customers' accounts, funds that the bank quickly reimbursed. Initially theft against 20, …
John Leyden, 10 Nov 2016
An angry mob

Fujitsu staffers strike over pay, job security and pensions

Three hundred unionised Fujitsu workers braved the bitter cold on Monday to attend the first of a two-day UK strike over pay, pensions and job security. The brothers downed tools for 24 hours last week in protest of work conditions, and turned out again today, leafleting current and prospective punters in Salford's media city …
Paul Kunert, 07 Nov 2016

HP Enterprise, Mirantis sack couple of hundred OpenStack engineers

Hewlett Packard Enterprise and Mirantis have laid off roughly 200 OpenStack developers in recent weeks, calling into question the appeal of OpenStack, the open source project for cloud computing infrastructure. HPE spokesperson Meghan Fintland in an email confirmed the layoffs, noting HPE does not provide details about the …
Thomas Claburn, 02 Nov 2016
container_ship_hamburg_shutterstock_648

Tenable ate FlawCheck for DevOps enhancement

In order to remain tenable as the security market adjusts to software containers, Tenable Network Security, based in Columbia, Maryland, has acquired FlawCheck, a San Francisco-based company founded last year to make Docker containers more secure. Renaud Deraison, CTO and cofounder of Tenable, contends that information …
Thomas Claburn, 26 Oct 2016
Suitcase full of money

Akamai rides on the botnet's back to US$584 million quarter

Cloud computing security has driven a 6 per cent year-on-year revenue growth for Akamai, up from $US551 million last year to $584 million for Q3 2016. The company's third quarter financial report shows its performance and security business unit turned in $345 million in revenue, 19 per cent higher than for the same quarter in …
Cloudy shopping trolley in the sky (representing cloud sales/procurement). Photo by Shutterstock

The cloud is not new. What we are doing with it is

Sysadmin blog In the 10 years since the modern form of public cloud computing went mainstream, it has changed the entire industry's approach to IT. In response, IT's top vendors have had to change as well. Like any technology, however, the public cloud has adapted, evolved, and become something much different than was ever originally …
Trevor Pott, 25 Oct 2016
Sanjay Mirchandani at PuppetConf 2016

Puppet shows its hand: All your software is belong to us

Special report In an episode of Seinfeld from 1996, George is shocked when he discovers his former boss, Mr Wilhelm, has joined a cult, the Sunshine Carpet Cleaners. “Most of the world is carpeted,” Wilhelm intones, vacuum in hand. “And one day, we will do the cleaning.” In sunny San Diego, California, on Thursday, executives from Puppet, …
Thomas Claburn, 21 Oct 2016

Data integrity and failover in the hybrid cloud

Discussions of information security tend to revolve around keeping confidential information confidential: preventing intruders from compromising the protection of the systems and gaining access to data they're not entitled to see. But there's more to security than just keeping information secret: it's a three-pronged concept. …
Dave Cartwright, 19 Oct 2016
Intel's Stratix 10 ARM-base FPGA

Microsoft boffins: Who needs Intel CPUs when you've got FPGAs?

Microsoft hooks up reprogrammable chips directly to its data centers' internal networks to ramp up the performance of its web applications. The Windows giant is so impressed by the tech, it reckons the customizable hardware could eventually take on more computational work than the Intel workhorse processors that today fill its …
Shaun Nichols, 17 Oct 2016
Losing money

The IRS spaffed $12m on Office 365 subscription IT NEVER USED

A report on spending from the office of the US Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) claims that between June 2015 and June 2016, the tax collectors paid $12m for subscriptions on Microsoft Office 365 and Exchange Online that were never used. The TIGTA report [PDF] found that in 2014, the IRS kicked off a …
Shaun Nichols, 14 Oct 2016

Post-referendum UK still part of Euro cyberterror stress test... for now

European enterprises are teaming with information security agencies and governments to run a pan-European cyberwar readiness exercise today. Cyber Europe 2016 - which involves thousands of experts from all 28 EU Member States, Switzerland and Norway - is being co-ordinated by European Union security agency ENISA. It's the …
John Leyden, 14 Oct 2016

Rage-making, anxiety-inducing tech distributors: An ode

Sysadmin Blog As vendors don't seem all that interested in selling equipment directly, value-added resellers (VARs), managed service providers (MSPs) and the like must buy our gear from distributors before selling it on to our clients. Oh, not all disties are totally awful. There's always one we can point to and say "I love those guys". …
Trevor Pott, 12 Oct 2016
Giant burger

Burger barn put cloud on IT menu, burned out its developers

In Australia fast-food history played out differently to the rest of the world and the nation no longer has Burger King. So when you want a Whopper down under you head to a chain called “Hungry Jack's” that is pretty much a BK clone. We mention the burger barn because Vulture South today encountered its CIO Bruce Nolte, who …
Simon Sharwood, 12 Oct 2016