Articles about Cambridge University

Successful fintech: UK has some, but it's not in Silicon Roundabout

Open up the business pages of any national newspaper and much of the coverage is focused on the latest fintech startup, the marvel that will transform the global financial system, backed – inevitably – by big name venture capital firms. But is this obsession with fintech deserved? A cool analysis of the phenomenon long term …
Marcus Gibson, 15 Jul 2016
By Bob Bob - https://flic.kr/p/914kty

Manchester cops to strap on 3K bodycams

Just a few days after a counter-terrorism incident which involved precisely zero terrorists, Greater Manchester Police (GMP) has started to deploy 3,000 body-worn video (BWV) cameras to its coppers. After enabling the evacuation of 75,000-seater Old Trafford on the final day of the Premier League, for what turned out to be a …
Supercomputer, image via shutterstock

Cambridge Uni spins up green and beefy supercomputer project

Cambridge University is leading a £2.7m project building energy efficient, high-performance supercomputers. Called Project Superspin, the project will attempt to marry research into electron spin with research on super conductive materials. The goal is to produce prototype logic and memory devices by 2021 for use in a …
Gavin Clarke, 18 Apr 2016
Tor

Tor users are actively discriminated against by website operators

Computer scientists have documented how a large and growing number of websites discriminate against people who browse them using Tor. Tor is an anonymity service that is maintained with assistance from the US State Department and designed in part to allows victims of censorship in countries like China and Iran to surf the web …
John Leyden, 25 Feb 2016

Cunning Greek lizards seek skin-matching rocks

Aegean wall lizards have demonstrated the impressive ability to hide from avian predators by camouflaging themselves against rocks "that best match the colour of their backs". The Aegean Wall Lizard. Pic: Cambridge University On the look-out for a matching rock: the Aegean wall lizard That's according to Kate Marshall from …
Lester Haines, 25 Jan 2016

'No safe level' booze guidelines? Nonsense, thunder stats profs

The heads of Britain’s statistics society have written to the Health Secretary to point out that the government’s alcohol guidelines don’t accurately reflect the numbers. Two weeks ago the British civil servant at the Department of Health responsible for issuing medical advice (who rejoices in the corporate-inspired title of “ …
Andrew Orlowski, 22 Jan 2016

Security bod watches heart data flow from her pacemaker to doctor via ... er, SMS? 3G? Email?

A computer security researcher has probed the communication protocols used by her pacemaker – and hopes her findings will raise awareness of just how much info medical devices are emitting. Marie Moe received her pacemaker four years ago after she experienced a form of arrhythmia, and her heart began to slow. Soon after, she …
Darren Pauli, 05 Jan 2016

Meet ARM1, grandfather of today's mobe, tablet CPUs – watch it crunch code live in a browser

Pics Chip geeks have produced an interactive blueprint of the ARM1 – the granddaddy of the processor cores powering billions of gadgets today, from Apple iPhones to Raspberry Pis, cameras, routers and Android tablets. The peeps behind the fascinating blog visual6502.org normally reverse-engineer chips by pulling the silicon out of …
Chris Williams, 28 Nov 2015

Cyber-terror: How real is the threat? Squirrels are more of a danger

Comment The UK Chancellor George Osborne last week announced that the British government plans to double cybersecurity spending and establish a single National Cyber Centre. Cybersecurity spending will rise to £1.9bn ($2.87bn) at a time of budget cuts to police and other government departments. More details are expected to come in the …
John Leyden, 24 Nov 2015

Terrorists seek to commit deadly 'cyber attacks' in UK, says Chancellor Osborne

Following Prime Minister David Cameron's re-announcement of funding increases for UK security personnel, Chancellor George Osborne delivered a speech today to GCHQ workers explaining that the increase is necessary as ISIL is seeking to "develop the capability" to launch deadly cyber attacks against British infrastructure. How …
Android icon desktop toys

Slacker vendors' one-fix-a-year effort leaves 88% of Androids vulnerable

Android vendors are hopeless at distributing patches and users of new handsets can expect just one update a year, leaving most exposed to critical vulnerabilities according to a new study. Cambridge University trio Daniel R Thomas, Alastair R Beresford, and Andrew Rice probed 20,400 devices and found 87.7 per cent contained at …
Darren Pauli, 16 Oct 2015
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WIPO punts Cambridge University over attempt to grab Cambridge.com

The University of Cambridge has lost an attempt to win control of the domain Cambridge.com from its owners. Kirkland Holdings LLC of Brookline Massachusetts purchased Cambridge.com for US$85,000 in 2010 and uses it to run a site called “Everything Cambridge” that offers tourist information for both the US and English cities of …
Simon Sharwood, 14 Oct 2015
Child measuring image via Shutterstock

By the numbers: The virtualisation options for private cloud hopefuls

VMware, Hyper-V ... XenServer? When it comes to virtualisation, these are the three most frequently cited options. And this would have been OK in the days before cloud, when virtualisation was “just” something for the boys and girls down in the sysadmin branch of the IT department cared about. Now we do have cloud, and private …
Tom Baines, 05 Oct 2015
Crop of doctor with pen and clipboard

Cambridge University Hospitals rated 'inadequate' due to £200m IT fail

Cambridge University Hospitals has been placed under special measures by the NHS regulator, after a failed £200m IT project plunged its finances into the red and left it unable to deliver key services. Health watchdog Monitor flagged the trust as "inadequate", following concerns about staffing levels, delays in outpatient …
Kat Hall, 22 Sep 2015
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My parents don't know I'm in SEO. They think I play piano in a brothel

Comment Search Engine Optimisation is desperately seeking respectability, with “creativity” being the main buzzword at the industry’s big get-together – with the dark arts of “black hat” SEO scarcely being mentioned. More than 1,700 search engine optimisers and digital marketers gathered last Friday (18 September) in the UK seaside …
Ollie Wilson, 21 Sep 2015
Doctor Nick Riviera

Right, opt out everybody! Hated Care.data paused again

The UK government's gaffe-prone Care.data scheme has been paused once again, this time to review the opt-out process of the much-hated and delayed program. Health secretary Jeremy Hunt has asked data guardian Fiona Caldicott to provide advice on the wording for patient consent and ‘opt-outs’. The scheme was launched in 2013 …
Kat Hall, 08 Sep 2015
IBM 5150 PC

Care.data is a complete omnishambles, says study into hated scheme

The hated Care.data scheme was dysfunctional and undemocratic from the get-go, according to a new case study from wannabe boffins studying on Cambridge University's Masters of Public Policy programme. The peer-reviewed case study is published in Technology Science, which describes itself as an open-access journal for those …

Flippin' heck, meet the Internet of Things wallpaper

British inventor Andrew Fentem has come up with a way of cheaply turning fabric into large active displays. Fentem, who pioneered multitouch input technology 15 years ago, only to see a UK quango squander the innovation and Apple reap the reward, calls the new display “organic pixels”. He’s invented an ulta-thin magnetic …
Andrew Orlowski, 29 Jul 2015
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Russian billionaire: GET me the ALIENS ON THE PHONE. Do it NOW

Humanity's quest to discover intelligent aliens resident in other star systems has received a big boost from well-known Russian biz overlord Yuri Milner, who has splashed $100m on the search with the endorsement of famous boffin Stephen Hawking. A project he calls Breakthrough Listen will give SETI researchers access to the …
Jennifer Baker, 20 Jul 2015
America

Security gurus deliver coup de grace to US govt's encryption backdoor demands

With congressional hearings due on Wednesday to discuss US government plans to force tech companies to install backdoors in their encryption systems, some of the leading minds in the security world have published a paper on how, and if, such a system would work. The authors of the 34-page paper [PDF] read like a who's who of …
Iain Thomson, 08 Jul 2015
Sir Maurice Wilkes photo Computer Laboratory University of Cambridge

Cambridge’s HPC-as-a-service for boffins, big and small

Cambridge University has been involved in high performance computing for 18 years, starting with a “traditional” supercomputer, before a major restructuring eight years later led to what would now be considered high-performance computing (HPC). We read much about how IT needs to become a profit not a cost center. Well, as part …

You've been a Baidu boy! Tech giant caught cheating on AI tests

Baidu has been shot in its liquid metal head for cheating in a standardised and independent Artificial Intelligence test. Hosted by Stanford University's vision lab, the Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge (ILSVRC) saw Baidu's algorithms compete alongside those from Google, Microsoft, Apple and Facebook's FART, among …
ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus) is one of six detector experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) – image by Maximilien Brice CERN/Science photo library

Large Hadron Collider gives young ALICE a black-hole ray gun

CERN's Large Hadron Collider is ready to provide more scientific breakthroughs to the world after almost two years of slumber and months of recommissioning. Particle-physics boffins tell us the new LHC experiments are "ready to take data at the unprecedented energy of 13 TeV (trillion electron volts), almost double the …
All UK police forces use Tetra

Transparency thrust sees Met police buying up to 30,000 bodycams

The Metropolitan Police is to begin buying up to 30,000 body cameras, as part of its ambition to become "the most transparent police force in the world", The Register has learned. Stephen Deakin, interim chief technology officer at the Met, told El Reg at the police tech provider TASER Summit: "We are accelerating the …
Kat Hall, 17 Apr 2015

Saturn's rings, radio waves ... poetry? At home with Scotland's Mr Physics

Geek's Guide to Britain Say the the word “radio” and the mind goes to Guglielmo Marconi, the Italian emigrant whose work on the watershed of Cornwall and the Atlantic Ocean helped turn wireless into the defining medium of the early 20th Century. But radio wasn’t invented by Marconi – or any one person. Rather, it was discovered, and the man who drove …
Bill Ray, 06 Apr 2015
Ancient cave frieze. Pic: Leon Yaakov

No, really, the $17,000 Apple Watch IS all about getting your leg over

Worstall on Wednesday There was a certain amount of consumer resistance to my assertion that the Apple Christometer's $17,000 worth of bling was all about sex. But I'm afraid that this really is so. Bling is about getting sex: and it's the women who decide that it is as well. We have a less than reputable source for this: …conspicuous consumption …
Tim Worstall, 25 Mar 2015
Stanford concept graphic indicating quantum electron interference holograms

UK.gov shovels £15m into training new quantum engineers

The government is flinging £15m at training "the next generation" of quantum engineers through investment in "skills hubs". Implicitly suggesting the existence of a current generation of quantum engineers, the Department of BIS hopes the investment will support the building of "innovative new products like 6G smartphones." As …
Angry old man

A Cambridge boffin told me YOU'RE A BIG, FAT LIAR

Cambridge University boffins have begun exploring an alternative to the traditional polygraph approach to detecting liars and cheats. Instead of calculating variations in a person's respiration, pulse and sweat production, the fib-detecting tech looks at the subject's body movements. As a first stage in investigating the …
John Leyden, 06 Jan 2015
Hybrid aircraft

Cambridge boffins and Boeing fly first hybrid airplane over British skies

Video The first hydrocarbon/electric aircraft has taken to the skies over Southern England as part of trials to find out if such combo systems have a place in aviation's future. Youtube Video The aircraft, a heavily modified microlight, uses a conventional four-stroke petrol engine as its main power source and an electric motor …
Iain Thomson, 24 Dec 2014

Lord Lucan, Murakami's Strange Library ... and a hitchhiker's guide to the Computing Universe

Page File El Reg bookworm Mark Diston trawls through the freshest releases in publishing. This week we have a trippy new Murakami about a murderous librarian, a murder mystery to suit Downton Abbey fans and lastly, a pop-sci romp through computing history that soon takes a turn for the sci-fi... The Strange Library Haruki Murakami has …
Mark Diston, 29 Nov 2014
A storm is brewing (Mali, Sahel). Foto: F. Guichard & L. Kergoat, AMMA project, CNRS copyright.

Met Office: 2014 was FIFTEENTH WARMEST UK SUMMER on record

The UK experienced its fifteenth hottest summer since 1910 this year, according to the latest Met Office figures, with the raging heat unsurpassed except in the years 1911, 1947, 1955 and eleven other years over the past century. "People are not adapting their homes, particularly in cities, to make them cooler. For vulnerable …
Lewis Page, 05 Nov 2014
SexPistols 1975

Weekend reads: So, Anyway..., Anger is an Energy and Smoke Gets in your Eyes

Page File El Reg bookworm Mark Diston reviews the latest tantalising tomes. There's a battle of the autobiographies going on, with comic genius John Cleese up against music's enfant terrible John Lydon, aka Johnny Rotten – we'll see who gets the last laugh here. We've also a surprisingly entertaining insight on the life of a mortician, …
Mark Diston, 11 Oct 2014
Lycurgus_Cup

4th Century GOBLET could REVIVE CORPSE of holographic storage

Cambridge boffins have discovered that thin films of silver nanoparticles can increase optical storage density and create multi-coloured holograms. The effect was first noted way back in fourth century Roman times (circa 290-325 AD) with the crafting of the Lycurgus Cup, an engraved glass goblet that has a green tint when lit …
Chris Mellor, 04 Sep 2014
Hallucigenia animation

Boffins ID freakish spine-smothered prehistoric critter: The CLAW gave it away

The surrealist nightmare worm Hallucigenia, so-called because of its otherworldly appearance and apparent lack of place on the taxonomic ranks, has finally found its place in evolutionary history... and even appears to have some modern-day descendants. Hallucigenia animation Hallucigenia is one of the most bizarre-looking …
Students using MacBooks in a lecture hall

A-level results: Before you smile at that jump-for-joy snap...

Traditionally, newspapers illustrate A-Level results day with pictures of attractive teens in mid-air. But soon it could be lank-haired, bespectacled nerds that are performing the vault of victory following news that students are flocking to tech-focused courses. Today is the day where pretty young things and their uglier, off- …
Jasper Hamill, 14 Aug 2014

Stephen Hawking biopic: Big on romance, not so much with the science?

Video The first trailer for Stephen Hawking biopic The Theory of Everything hints at a movie heavy on the romance and tragedy of the renowned physicist’s life. Trailer for Stephen Hawking biopic The Theory of Everything The film, based on Travelling to Infinity: My Life with Stephen, the memoir of Hawking’s first wife Jane Wilde, …
Cambridge's superconducting magnet levitating

Cambridge's tiny superconducting magnet breaks strength record

Boffins at the University of Cambridge say they've packed the equivalent of three tonnes of magnetic force into a superconducting material roughly the size of a golf ball. In what they call a “trapped field” experiment, the university says its researchers managed to cram a 17.6 Tesla magnetic field into the brittle “high …
GoogleProjectShield

Google discovers it must expose itself to compete with AWS

Google is giving away some of its internal technologies in an attempt to beat Amazon in one area where Bezos may be loathe to compete: transparency. The company announced this week that it was creating an open source project named "Kubernetes" based on its super-secret Omega cloud technology, and another project named cAdvisor …
Jack Clark, 12 Jun 2014
Photo by Thore Siebrands Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Improbable: YOU gave model Lily Cole £200k for her Impossible.com whimsy-site

Special Report Why is the UK taxpayer funding a millionaire supermodel and actress to build a website that replicates the "Help Needed" pages of Craigslist and Freecycle? Using information gleaned from Freedom of Information requests, we’ve attempted to find out. The model and actress Lily Luahana Cole, a Cambridge University art history …
Andrew Orlowski, 25 Mar 2014
A boat full of Fail

Phisherman's friend: Confused hacktivists deface FAKE BANK SITE

Anon hackers have been caught boasting about defacing a counterfeit Yorkshire Bank website. Hacktivist crew Anon Ghost earned coverage on underground security blogs for defacing “Yorkshire Bank, one of the largest United Kingdom bank (sic)”. However, the hackers actually hit "ybs-bank.com", a Malaysian imitation of the real …
John Leyden, 06 Mar 2014

Brit boffins brew up blight-resistant FRANKENSPUD

A team of British researchers has announced the results of test cultivation of a blight-resistant potato - a transgenic creation featuring a "gene isolated from a wild relative of potato, Solanum venturii, and introduced by GM methods into the potato variety Desiree". For three growing seasons from 2010-12, scientists from the …
Lester Haines, 18 Feb 2014
Micro Men

Micro Men: The story of the syntax era

Monitor is an occasional column written at the crossroads where the arts, popular culture and technology intersect. Here we look back at the BBC TV movie Micro Men, a retro-tech fan favourite which tells the story of the rivalry between former colleagues Sir Clive Sinclair and Chris Curry, and how the two men kickstarted the British …
Tony Smith, 14 Feb 2014
Amstrad CPC 464

You’re NOT fired: The story of Amstrad’s amazing CPC 464

Archaeologic It was a home computer that embodied so many contradictions. It was launched months after the British microcomputer boom of the early 1980s had peaked. It was a rush job: the machine that was revealed to the press in the Spring of 1984 hadn’t even existed nine months previously. It was one of the best-produced British micros of …
Tony Smith, 12 Feb 2014
Reading Room British Library, St Pancras by Paul Grundy.

UK libraries trial free access to scientific research

Hundreds of thousands of journal articles are to be made available to the public in Blighty's local libraries after a government consultation on how to expand access to publicly funded research. The Access to Research Initiative is kicking off a two-year pilot programme today, after major publishers like the Nature Group, …
Bezos headshot

Amazon's 'schizophrenic' open source selfishness scares off potential talent, say insiders

Exclusive Amazon is one of the most technically influential companies operating today – but you wouldn't know it, thanks to a dearth of published research papers and negligible code contributions to the open-source projects it relies on. This, according to multiple insiders, is becoming a problem. The corporation is described as a "black …
Jack Clark, 22 Jan 2014
Science of Cambridge MK14 close-up

Ian Williamson: The engineer who gave Sinclair his first micro

Archaeologic Before Sinclair Research and the QL, the Spectrum and the ZX81, before even Sinclair Computers and the ZX80, there was Science of Cambridge and the MK14 microprocessor kit. Released in February 1978 - that’s when the first adverts for the mail-order-only offering appeared, at least - the MK14 entered the SoC pipeline late in the …
Tony Smith, 16 Jan 2014
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Calling all Spare Rib veterans: Sisters, don't lose your rights!

Contributors to the iconic feminist magazine Spare Rib, which ran from 1972 to 1993, have been warned not to sign away their rights. Last week the British Library contacted over a thousand former contributors giving them just seven days to give their consent to what it described as a "digitisation project". If authors …
Andrew Orlowski, 19 Dec 2013

Hypnotic wind map captures Earth's heavenly currents

Those readers slumped behind their desks in the traditional pre-Xmas torpor and who are looking for an alternative to watching the clock hands crawling towards Yule liberation are directed towards "earth" - magnificent animated views of the world's wind currents. Global wind currents shown on earth Using data from the …
Lester Haines, 19 Dec 2013

Fair winds and following servers: The art of flight prediction

Back in September, the Low Orbit Helium Assisted Navigator (LOHAN) team sent a mighty orb aloft on a test flight of our magnificent Vulture 2 spaceplane's rocket motor igniter. The mission was a textbook operation, with the the payload eventually returning to terra firma within a few hundred metres of the awaiting team, at a …
Lester Haines, 18 Dec 2013
Cosmic strings of string theory

Cambs prof scoops $3m Fundamental Physics prize

Stephen Hawking's successor at Cambridge University, Michael Green, and his fellow theorist John Schwarz at Caltech, have won the second Fundamental Physics Prize. String theory pioneers Green, who became Lucasian professor of mathematics when Hawking stepped down in 2009, and Schwarz won the $3m prize for their work on …