Articles about Burden

Migrating birds in the cloud

Riverbed bakes SD-WAN into WAN optimisation

Riverbed is hoping to push more large-scale Software-Defined WAN (SD-WAN) deployments with a data centre version of its SteelConnect, plus integration of the system into its SteelHead appliances under the new moniker "SteelHead SD". The SteelConnect SDI-5030 provides an SD-WAN-capable data centre gateway gets integration with …

ASLR-security-busting JavaScript hack demo'd by university boffins

Researchers in Europe have developed a way to exploit a common computer processor feature to bypass a crucial security defense provided by modern operating systems. By abusing the way today's CPUs manage system memory, an attacker can discover where software components, such as libraries and RAM-mapped files, are located in …
Shaun Nichols, 14 Feb 2017
Apple iPod touch

Explained: Apple iCloud kept 'deleted' browser histories for over a year

Apple appears to have fixed a flaw in iCloud that retained a copy of deleted Safari browsing history data synced from local devices for more than a year. On Thursday, Russian computer forensics software biz Elcomsoft said that its forensic software was able to recover Safari browser history records that had been stored in …
Thomas Claburn, 10 Feb 2017
 Donald Trump . Editorial use only. Editorial Credit: a katz / Shutterstock.com

Grumpy Trump trumped, now he's got the hump: Muslim ban beaten back by appeals court

President Trump has suffered a serious blow to his authority following a decision by a court of appeals against his controversial travel ban. Late Thursday, the Ninth Circuit in San Francisco denied an emergency motion to lift an injunction against the ban, which restricted people from seven Muslim-majority countries from …
Kieren McCarthy, 10 Feb 2017
Sparks, image via Shutterstock

Memory1: All right, Sparky, here's the deal: We've sorted your DRAM runtimes

Analysis Chinese server vendor Inspur has cut Spark workload runtimes in half by bulking out DRAM with Diablo Technologies' Memory1 technology. Inspur and Diablo say users can achieve more work per server and reduce the time needed to process larger datasets than servers with DRAM alone. Memory1 is a 128GB DDR4 module using NAND flash …
Chris Mellor, 09 Feb 2017

Australia wants to jail infosec researchers for pointing out dodgy data

Australia's proposed laws outlawing research into data de-anonymisation look set to proceed after a Senate Committee report landed yesterday complete with just one recommendation: that the bill be passed. The Privacy Amendment (Re-identification Offence) Bill 2016 was proposed after researchers Dr Vanessa Teague, Dr Chris …

Data breach notification law finally makes it to Australia's Parliament

Australia's long-awaited and long-delayed data breach notification laws are back on the political agenda, after the nation's House of Representatives passing the legislation yesterday. The bill now before Australia's Senate is the rather limp document that landed in October 2016. Companies will have the chance to keep mum …

Streetmap loses appeal against Google Maps dominance judgement

Streetmap has lost its application to appeal against last year’s High Court judgement that Google did nothing wrong by promoting its own Maps product above Streetmap’s. “The bully boys won the day,” said Streetmap, immediately after the judgement was delivered. “This is a sad day for the internet.” Lord Justice Lloyd Jones, …
Gareth Corfield, 07 Feb 2017

Microsoft foists fake file system for fat Git repos

To lighten the burden of massive Git source code repositories, Microsoft has created a virtualized file system that allows developers to interact with large codebases without sending excessive amounts of data across the network. Git (when not applied to people or animals) refers to a distributed version control system for …
Thomas Claburn, 03 Feb 2017
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MNOs will lose 5G rewards to new entrants if they will not share networks

Analysis The advantages of network sharing seem glaringly obvious in a world where the mismatch between mobile data demand and mobile data ARPU is rushing MNOs’ profits. The need to reduce the cost of delivering those rising tides of data is urgent, but many operators are ready to discuss almost any tactic – Wi-Fi offload, automation, …
Wireless Watch, 02 Feb 2017
Old man's hands typing on laptop

'Grey technology' should be the new black

My dad seems to have a propensity for breaking the all of the kit we’ve given him to allow us to have a trans-oceanic video chat pretty much any time either of us wants. Apple’s Facetime came along just around the time I moved to Australia. Skype wasn’t far behind. Between these two we’ve been able to keep our relationship going …
Mark Pesce, 31 Jan 2017

Hey, AT&T. Help us out. Why is buying Time Warner a good idea?

Fifteen US Senators are asking AT&T to provide them with an outline of how they plan to benefit the public with the $85.4bn acquisition of Time Warner. Democrats Al Franken (MN), Elizabeth Warren (MA), and Patrick Leahy (VT), as well as Independent Bernie Sanders (VT), signed on to the letter [PDF] calling for AT&T boss …
Shaun Nichols, 25 Jan 2017

Nuclear power station sensors are literally shouting their readings at each other

Audio-based networking may seem an unusual choice for the Internet of Things, especially when used for machines to bellow information at each other inside a nuclear power station. The Register spoke to Chirp at yesterday's IoT Tech Expo conference in London, where the firm's Daniel Jones, chief science officer, explained how …
Gareth Corfield, 24 Jan 2017
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Red Hat's OpenShift Container Platform openly shifts storage into the hands of devs

Enterprise Linux biz Red Hat has revised its OpenShift Container Platform to include support for dynamic storage provisioning in local and remote applications. The software is an on-premises platform-as-a-service product that allows organizations to run applications using Kubernetes orchestration and Docker containers. The …
Thomas Claburn, 18 Jan 2017
The FBI seal on a building

FBI takes gag out of Cloudflare's mouth after three-year legal battle

Cloudflare successfully fended off an FBI demand for people's private information, we can report this week now that a gagging order has been ripped away. In February 2013, the Feds slapped a National Security Letter (NSL) on the San Francisco-based web delivery biz, requiring it to hand over some customer account records and …

Australia telcos warn: Opening metadata access will create a 'honeypot' for lawyers

Australia's telecoms industry advocacy body the Communications Alliance is renewing its push for the federal government to revise its data retention regime, amid fears that a review will see stored data sucked into civil lawsuits. The take-out-the-trash timing of the review, announced in the afternoon of Friday December 23, …
HYDRAstor_node

NEC mentions it has a high-end dedupe disk backup box, stretches, yawns for 40 seconds

Analysis NEC has the biggest, baddest scale-out deduping backup-to-disk array on the planet and we virtually never hear about it. NEC is not a top-six purpose-built backup supplier, according to IDC, being neither a unit ship or revenue leader. Yet there are 1,100 customers and 1,800 installations, around three exabytes under …
Chris Mellor, 13 Dec 2016

Has Samsung, er, rounded the corner with Apple court win?

Analysis Some good news has finally fallen the way of Samsung, as the Supreme Court has ruled in favour of the South Korean giant in its ongoing patent spat with Apple - scrapping a $399m damages bill in the latest episode of the hottest legal battle in tech, though certainly not the last. At the heart of this is the idea that instead …
Faultline, 09 Dec 2016

Cheap virtual box hosters – Amazon's Lightsail is out to destroy you (yes, you, Digital Ocean)

AWS re:Invent Now that it dominates the public cloud market, Amazon is setting its sights lower – on developers deploying small projects – in the hope that these customers will remain within the AWS ecosystem. In conjunction with AWS re:Invent in Las Vegas on Wednesday, Amazon introduced Lightsail, a service that allows customers to launch …
Thomas Claburn, 30 Nov 2016
Well-dressed man drinks whisky in expensive flat. Photo by Shutterstock

Confirmation of who constitutes average whisky consumer helps resolve dispute

The average consumer of Scotch whisky is reasonably well informed and reasonably observant and circumspect member of the general public who has an average level of attention, the EU's General Court has confirmed in ruling over a trade mark dispute. The determination by the Court helped whisky manufacturer William Grant & Sons …
OUT-LAW.COM, 29 Nov 2016
Peter Capaldi in bbc2 political satire The Thick of It. Copyright BBC

Gov's industrial strategy: 'Look, we've changed the words above our door'

Analysis We know the government is serious about an industrial strategy because it renamed the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills to the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. Unfortunately, five months on that's still just about all we know. More details are expected in the Autumn Statement today. …
Kat Hall, 23 Nov 2016
An unhappy driver

The Pew 'gig economy' study is here, and it's grim

Around 56 per cent of "gig economy" workers say the income they get from those services is essential to making ends meet. This according to a study from Pew Research, which interviewed 4,579 workers from various app-based services including dial-a-ride, cleaning and laundry, and food and grocery delivery apps. Pew estimates …
Shaun Nichols, 18 Nov 2016
Melbourne, Australia -May 19, 2016: Blue and white Police tape cordoning off a building site like a crime scene, Australia 2016. Editorial Credit: STRINGER Image / Shutterstock.com   Editorial Use Only.

The case for a police-civilian cyber super-agency in Australia

Opinion The Australian Federal Government is wasting millions of dollars on redundant cyber-capabilities. It should scupper its competing agencies and strip powers from others, and hand the lot to a resuscitated Australian High Tech Crime Center police-civilian super-agency that would be distributed across Australian capital cities. …
Mark Arena, 17 Nov 2016
HP's forthcoming Elite X3 Windows Phone

HP Elite x3 phablet: The three-in-one business has been waiting for?

Review HP is making a hugely ambitious return to smartphones, billing the Elite x3 as “one device that’s every device”. No pressure, then. The proposition is that the Elite x3 is a phone that doubles as a PC and tablet replacement. Once connected to an external display, keyboard and mouse, either wirelessly or via a dock, this hefty …
Andrew Orlowski, 08 Nov 2016
Girl magnifying glass, photo via Shutterstock

Privacy Commission wants new rights for personal data control

In August, The Register called for the Australian government to put in place an independent agency to oversee use of citizens' data. In a report released today, the country's Productivity Commission (PC) has called for the same thing. The PC makes the call in its draft Data Availability and Use report, announced here. It calls …
Switch

If any idiot can do it, we're heading in the right direction

Sysadmin Blog The enemy of success is complexity. Although I am in general a fan of the concept of intricately intertwined Rube Goldbergian nonsense, my life thus far could be summed up as learning the value of simplicity face first. IT is all about complexity, and unpicking which combination of barely functional crap is least likely to go …
Trevor Pott, 02 Nov 2016

Vatican and musicians at odds over appropriate use of crematorium leftovers

The Vatican has put itself on a collision course with the rock music industry, after banning the spreading of human ash-ley remains. The declaration that spreading or storing crematoria scrapings, flies in the face of a upsurge of musicians’ innovative re-use of the mortal remains of deceased band members, fans, and indeed …
Clodagh Doyle, 26 Oct 2016
Nerd fail photo via Shutterstock

Is this the worst Blockchain idea you've ever heard?

Poll The music industry has been a petri dish for some fairly atrocious digital ideas, but few can be as desperate as Blockchain. Is this the worst Blockchain idea you’ve ever heard? We thought the business had scraped rock bottom with blockchain .bc “format”. This got oodles of press, as Imogen Heap was fronting the publicity for …
Andrew Orlowski, 20 Oct 2016

NSA, GCHQ and even Donald Trump are all after your data

Comment As production and usage of data keeps growing globally, it’s worth remembering that the US government wants access to your information and will use warrants, decryption or hacking to get to it. That’s not news and the US government has many tools in its box. Many had already heard of the Uniting and Strengthening America by …
Frank Jennings, 20 Oct 2016
Photo by Joseph Sohm / Shutterstock

Third of Donald Trump's debate deplorables are mindless automatons

Hillary Clinton may have the most human supporters among those running for the US presidency, but Donald Trump has an edge among automatons. Pro-Trump Twitter hashtags from September 26 – the date of the first US presidential debate – through September 29 outnumbered pro-Clinton hashtags by about two-to-one, according to a …
Thomas Claburn, 19 Oct 2016
Australian Parliament House Canberra

Australia's new data breach disclosure laws have a rather floppy definition of 'breach'

After years of discussion a draft of Australia's proposed data breach disclosure laws has landed and, to The Register's mind, it leaves a lot of wriggle room for those who would keep breaches secret. The draft Privacy Amendment (Notifiable Data Breaches) Bill 2016 (PDF) doesn't make it compulsory to report a breach. “It would …
Simon Sharwood, 19 Oct 2016
Unemployed men queued outside a depression soup kitchen opened in Chicago by Al Capone U.S. Information Agency. (08/01/1953 - 03/27/1978)

Basic income after automation? That’s not how capitalism works

Analysis Philosophers, economists and other academics have long discussed the idea of “basic income” – an unconditional monthly check from the government to every citizen, in an amount at least high enough to cover all basic necessities. Recently, this idea has gained more political traction: Even conservative parties consider it, and …
League of gentlemen poster - Tubbs and Edward at the local shop. Copyright BBC

British jobs for British people: UK tech rejects PM May’s nativist hiring agenda

Comment “If you believe you’re a citizen of the world, you’re a citizen of nowhere. You don’t understand what the very word ‘citizenship’ means." So British Prime Minister Theresa May told her party’s conference last week. Home secretary Amber Rudd laid out plans at the conference to make it harder for British employers to hire …
Gavin Clarke, 13 Oct 2016

Oz gummint's de-anonymisation crime is as mind-bendingly stupid as we feared

The text of the government's proposed bill outlawing data re-identification looks worse than researchers feared. Apart from the legislation's maximum two-year stretch for anybody that cracks whatever key an agency applies to the data, there's also the points that government agencies are exempted from the bill (giving them what …
Mist and condensation, image via Shutterstock

Big Mickey Dell is wrong: Cloud ain't going to eat all of IT

Storage architect Public cloud will not consume all of IT. At least that’s what Michael Dell is claiming. In his opinion, cloud will become just another form of computing and a choice will be made by users to do cloud on-premises or rent from a cloud provider. Bearing in mind Dell is in the hardware business, we can hardly expect a comment …
Chris Evans, 12 Oct 2016

Rage-making, anxiety-inducing tech distributors: An ode

Sysadmin Blog As vendors don't seem all that interested in selling equipment directly, value-added resellers (VARs), managed service providers (MSPs) and the like must buy our gear from distributors before selling it on to our clients. Oh, not all disties are totally awful. There's always one we can point to and say "I love those guys". …
Trevor Pott, 12 Oct 2016

Breaking compression, one year at a time

Sysadmin Blog Computers physically last a lot longer than vendors would like. The idea of the three-year refresh cycle is considered sacred amongst a certain crowd, but when pressed most will admit that refreshes of that nature are exceptionally rare. While we can keep equipment running for a decade or beyond, there are hidden issues in doing …
Trevor Pott, 07 Oct 2016
Watson Power7 cluster. Pic: IBM

Regulatory compliance problems? Promontory, my dear Watson

Never mind cancer research or climate change: IBM is finally bringing its Watson AI technology to bear on one of the real challenges still facing human civilisation – regulatory compliance. Big Blue has announced plans to snarf up Promontory Financial Group, a risk management and regulatory compliance consultancy, and combine …
Dan Robinson, 03 Oct 2016

Ericsson’s patent pool is far from the new start the IoT needs

Analysis There are many interesting aspects to the announcement that Qualcomm, among others, is joining Ericsson’s Avanci patent pool scheme. Some of these appear contradictory. On the one hand, Avanci illustrates how the old patent structures of the mobile industry will no longer be fit for purpose for the Internet of Things (IoT). …
Wireless Watch, 03 Oct 2016

Invasion of the Brandsnatchers: How Nokia and BlackBerry inhabit the afterlife

Analysis Early next year you should able to buy Nokia phones and BlackBerry phones, two of the giant names of the Noughties. None of these phones will be made by Nokia or BlackBerry, and all of them will be Android phones. The famous brands will inhabit new bodies, with the licensees hoping to rekindle some nostalgia both giants once …
Andrew Orlowski, 30 Sep 2016
A skull atop money

Termination fees for terminated people now against the law

The US state of New York has had to pass a law to stop telcos and utility companies from charging fees to the deceased. Governor Andrew Cuomo said that bill A.8630A /S.6485-A, signed into effect earlier this week, will impose a $1,000 fine to any phone, internet, cable, or power operator that attempts to charge a recently …
Shaun Nichols, 30 Sep 2016

Narcissist Heidi Powell wants her dot-com and she wants it now, now, NOW!

Heidi Powell wants her namesake dot-com and she's suing to get it. Heidi who? Heidi Powell of course, the legendary fitness coach from Flagstaff, Arizona. What do you mean you've never heard of her? The Heidi Powell. Perhaps this will help: we're not talking about 60-year-old marketing consultant Heidi Powell who registered …
Kieren McCarthy, 27 Sep 2016

Zombie Moore's Law shows hardware is eating software

After being pronounced dead this past February - in Nature, no less - Moore’s Law seems to be having a very weird afterlife. Within the space of the last thirty days we've seen: Intel announce some next-generation CPUs that aren’t very much faster than the last generation of CPUs; Intel delay, again, the release of some of …
Mark Pesce, 22 Sep 2016
EU flag photo via Shutterstock

Brexit will happen. The EU GDPR will happen. You can't avoid either

Article 50, the process for Britain’s formal withdrawal from the European Union, is looming. Upon the conclusion of Article 50, data centres resident in Britain will no longer be subject to EU data protection rules. Today, UK data centres are bound by the EU Data Protection Directive (95/46/C), which was in turn based on the …
Danny Bradbury, 16 Sep 2016
Azure Media Redactor at work

'Scalable redaction' on Azure

Microsoft has fired up a service called “Azure Media Redactor” that fuzzes faces in videos. The new service is part of Azure's Media Analytics offering, a suite of tools for handling media at scale. The Media Redactor is billed as offering “anonymization by blurring the faces of selected individuals, and is ideal for use in …
Simon Sharwood, 13 Sep 2016

Tim Cook: EU lied about Apple taxes. Watch out Ireland, this is a coup!

Apple’s chief executive Tim Cook has claimed that the European Commission made up its claims about the business’ tax payments in Ireland. Earlier this week EU competition commissioner Margrethe Vestager said that Ireland failing to collect taxes from Apple at the standard rate of 12.5 per cent amounted to “state aid” and thus …

Pivot3 tries to butter up sysadmins with policy-driven protection

Ageing startup Pivot3 has added policy-driven data protection to its hyper-converged systems. The firm said the move is part of the Quality of Service (QoS) function. It has extended its QoS functions to include this data protection, plus application integration, scheduling and performance enhancements. Customers can define …
Chris Mellor, 17 Aug 2016
Man exasperated after being on hold for a long period of time. Photo by Shutterstock

HMRC: We've got £1.3bn for digital tax schemes. Tell us how to spend it

HMRC is casting around for ideas on how to splash £1.3bn in order to become the most "digitally advanced" tax administration in the world. Last year the body was awarded £1.3bn of digital investment over the next four years, which it said would yield £1bn in extra tax revenue after 2020 by ending "bureaucratic form-filling". …
Kat Hall, 15 Aug 2016

Cops to let the private sector chase after cybercrims' assets

The City of London Police is piloting a scheme to allow the private sector to chase after miscreants in civil courts in return for a share of the loot. The scheme, which is set to run for two years, has been launched explicitly because of the lower standard of proof necessary for the recovery of assets in civil courts. City …

Sales staff exodus at PernixData as Nutanix gobbles up caching biz

Analysis Amid mounting evidence that Nutanix has bought PernixData, both companies are still keeping their lips firmly and officially sealed. Pernix insiders and several well-placed industry sources have now confirmed the acquisition privately to The Register. Separately, Dan Edson – senior director of marketing operations, automation …
Chris Mellor, 04 Aug 2016