Articles about Bother

inspector clouseau

'NBN leak' documents sent to Jason Claire are privileged, says House of Reps committee

Some of the “NBN leak” documents seized by the Australian Federal Police (AFP) are covered by parliamentary privilege, says the House of Representatives Privileges Members' Interests Committee, which yesterday published its report into the documents. After a complaint by nbn™ over documents passed to the opposition's former …
Intersecting above-ground highways (skyways) constructed in intricate pattern, shot from below at night. Photo by Shutterstock

SwiftStack, Cohesity add public cloud on-ramps

+Comment On-premises IT storage suppliers are actively working to water down the importance of on-site hardware by building on-ramps to the public cloud. SwiftStack's Cloud Sync syncs on‑premises object-stored data with the AWS S3-accessed and Google Cloud Storage public clouds. Cohesity's Data Platform has had a Cloud Edition added …
Chris Mellor, 28 Nov 2016

The Internet Society is unhappy about security – pretty much all of it

The Internet Society (ISOC) is the latest organisation saying, in essence, “security is rubbish – fix it”. Years of big data breaches are having their impact, it seems: in its report released last week, it quotes a 54-country, 24,000-respondent survey reporting a long-term end user trend to become more fearful in using the …
Pennies in a jar. Photo via Shutterstock

You want SaaS? Don't bother, darling, your kind can't afford it

Something for the Weekend, Sir? "That member is the wrong way around," confides the gym receptionist in hushed tones, nodding towards a middle-aged fellow ambling into the cardio room. I stare after him, trying to guess how his member might be incorrectly attached. Dressed unfashionably and, I suspect, quite accidentally in a sleeveless side-boob vest, split …
Alistair Dabbs, 25 Nov 2016
Bulls_eye_target

Tech giants warn IoT vendors to get real about security

The heavyweights behind the Broadband Internet Technical Advisory Group (BITAG) are sick of Internet of Things (IoT) startups foisting insecure rubbish on consumers, and have fired a report that looks like a stern warning that IoT bandwagon-hoppers need to get their houses in order. The group – which counts vendors like Cisco …

Windows cmd.exe deposed by PowerShell

Taking timeworn advice for authors to "murder your darlings," Microsoft has done away with the Windows Command Prompt. The newly released Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 14971 for PC has made PowerShell the default command line tool, a promotion that coincides with PowerShell's 10-year anniversary. "In an effort to bring the …
Thomas Claburn, 18 Nov 2016

Nest Cam: A compelling piece of hardware-software

Review It was only a few years ago that everyone was scoffing at futurists who claimed that we would all be streaming our music rather than buying digital or physical copies. But I want to own my music, bellowed many. I want physical CDs, not computer files. When digital files became more useful and usable, there were more reasons …
Kieren McCarthy, 17 Nov 2016
Drought

Low-end notebook, rocking horse shit or hen's teeth

A low-end notebook drought is likely coming to a town near you, multiple analysts and tech distributors have told The Reg. NAND flash is one component that has been in short supply in recent months, and glass panel manufacturers are shifting priority to higher margin areas including TVs, sources told us. Tim Coulling, senior …
Paul Kunert, 15 Nov 2016
Sydney Harbour Bridge in the cloud

Adobe Australia drops SaaS tax dodge

The world's ongoing efforts to get multinational technology companies paying and collecting the proper amount of tax has claimed another win, with Adobe advising it will add Australia's Goods and Services Tax (GST - think VAT, British readers and sales tax in North America) to the cost of its Creative Cloud. Australia charges …
Simon Sharwood, 09 Nov 2016
HP's forthcoming Elite X3 Windows Phone

HP Elite x3 phablet: The three-in-one business has been waiting for?

Review HP is making a hugely ambitious return to smartphones, billing the Elite x3 as “one device that’s every device”. No pressure, then. The proposition is that the Elite x3 is a phone that doubles as a PC and tablet replacement. Once connected to an external display, keyboard and mouse, either wirelessly or via a dock, this hefty …
Andrew Orlowski, 08 Nov 2016
clinton vs Trump poster illustration. Photo by Shutterstock/editorial use only

Was IoT DDoS attack just a dry run for election day hijinks?

Comment The distributed denial of service attack that took down DNS provider Dyn, and with it access to a chunk of the internet, was one of the largest such assaults seen. The attack exploited Internet of Things devices – notably webcams built by XiongMai Technologies. The gadgets had default login passwords that allowed them to be …
John Oates, 08 Nov 2016
shutterstock_popcorn_cat

More movie and TV binge-streaming sites join UK banned list

Thirteen more pirate sites have have been added to the list of domains that the largest UK ISPs must block*. This time the target sites are dedicated to binge-watching TV series and theatrical run films. Although nobody in the movie and TV business – which is fuelling a tech jobs boom in the UK – claims it's the only solution …
Andrew Orlowski, 01 Nov 2016
Money falling, image via Shutterstock

VMware's weakness? It didn't beat every target for every product in Q3

If VMware is a legacy software company soon to be killed by cloud, you may want to find more more legacy companies in which to invest*, because Virtzilla has just posted another another quarter in which its core virtualisation products helped it to beat guidance for earnings and revenue. The headline numbers are revenue for Q3 …
Simon Sharwood, 27 Oct 2016
studio

Microsoft's Surface Studio desk-slab, Dial knob, Surface Book: We get our claws on new kit

Hands on After sitting through two hours of presentations, Microsoft has let journalists loose on the new kit it has announced, and the results are surprisingly good – at least from a hardware perspective. Microsoft's engineers positively salivated about the attention to detail the Studio design has (see our earlier story), from its 20 …
Iain Thomson, 27 Oct 2016
Hammer, spanner and screw

Chap turns busted laptop into phone keyboard, in Himalayan book-rescue mission

We all know that sinking feeling when you realise your laptop screen is broken and you need to use it sooner than you can get it fixed. So has Thomas Buckley-Houston, who's written a MacGyver-esque how-to for getting to his phone from the laptop's keyboard (going the other way via VNC is easier) – when he couldn't see the …

EU legal eagle: Euro court should review Intel's €1.6bn fine

An EU High Court Advocate General has recommended a review of the case that saw Intel slapped with a record fine after it was found to have coerced OEMs to avoid using rival companies' x86 CPUs. Back in 2009, the EC imposed a €1.06bn penalty - 4.15 per cent of Intel's turnover - following a multi-year legal battle but …
Bemused attendees trying out VR at the Samsung Galaxy S7 launch

Think virtual reality is just about games? Think again, friend

With the launch of PlayStation's VR headset, we are clearly entering a brave new world of virtual reality – everything from the low-end Google Daydream to the far-too-expensive Oculus Rift. But while interest has been focused on the gaming possibilities, an undercurrent of filmmakers has started exploring the storytelling …
Kieren McCarthy, 18 Oct 2016

Google has unleashed Factivism to smite the untruthy

Analysis I remember when I first noticed “factivism”. It was more than 10 years ago. In 2003, Californian internet evangelists were still bruised by the dot.com implosion when the United States invaded Iraq on a bogus pretext, WMDs. The web evangelicals thought: wait a minute. The Internet (PBUI) is a Good Thing. The Internet delivers …
Andrew Orlowski, 17 Oct 2016
Man wrapped in turqouise cable-knit blanket sips from hot drink - is clearly ill. Photo by Shutterstock

Internet of Things will turn up the compute heat for data centres

IPExpo The Internet of Things will put more demand upon mid-range and co-lo data centres, according to the marketing manager of data centre kit firm Minkels. Speaking at London’s IPExpo conference this morning, Minkels’ Niek van der Pas explained how, in his view, the explosion of IoT device usage will push more and more workloads …
Gareth Corfield, 06 Oct 2016

NIST: People have given up on cybersecurity – it's too much hassle

Online security for the general public is just too much bother. According to a study released on Tuesday by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and published in IEEE's IT Professional, people are overwhelmed with messages about online perils and have just given up. The result, as the study puts it, is …
Thomas Claburn, 06 Oct 2016

Google's hardware extravaganza: Ad giant takes on Sonos, Roku, Linksys, Amazon, Oculus... you name it

In just 90 minutes on Tuesday morning, Google took an enormous leap into the hardware market, offering new products to compete with Sonos in the music streaming market, Roku in video streaming, Linksys in routers, Amazon in voice assistants, Oculus in virtual reality, and Apple in phones. The sheer depth and breadth of the …
Kieren McCarthy, 04 Oct 2016
Photo by Featureflash Photo Agency / Shutterstock

In the name of love, don't scalp your U2 aka Dreamfest tickets, warns Salesforce

For the second time in three weeks, delegates are flooding into San Francisco for a big conference – last month it was Oracle OpenWorld and now the Salesforce Dreamforce conference kicks off on Tuesday. Dreamforce sold out early this year, with the $1,799 tickets getting snapped up more quickly than expected. As with anything …
Iain Thomson, 03 Oct 2016
question_marks_648

Optus' HFC problems were never a secret, so why did nbn™ need the network?

Someone check in on former senator Stephen Conroy, would they, and make sure he hasn't laughed himself to death? One of the reasons nbnTM set the Australian Federal Police (AFP) onto the pugilistic parliamentarian was that documents leaked to him suggested Optus' hybrid fibre-coax (HFC) network wasn't fit for purpose. That …
Windows 10 by Anton Watman, image via Shutterstock

Official: Windows 10 has hit the 400 million device mark

Microsoft’s self-installing Windows 10 operating system has reached the 400 million mark, the firm announced at its Ignite conference in Atlanta this week, up from the previous high of 350 million in August. This adoption rate means the firm’s self-imposed target of a billion devices by mid-2018 looks increasingly unlikely, …
Dan Robinson, 27 Sep 2016
CAIDA network diagram

CAIDA adds geo-tags to its Internet AS dataset

We know what you're thinking, “when did a label on a diagram rate a news story?” but bear with us: the 'net-boffins at CAIDA have added labels to the vast dataset that maps AS-AS links worldwide. Autonomous systems (AS) are collections of IP addresses administered by a single entity. There are lots of ASes in the world – more …

The Rise, Fall and Return of TomTom

Interview Yesterday TomTom announced seven new consumer products (eight if you count the two SatNav units) with four fitness and three navigation products, its highest High Street profile for some years. Corinne Vigreux Corinne Vigreux Tech pundits were preparing the last rites for the SatNav pioneer a few years ago, but it has …
Andrew Orlowski, 09 Sep 2016
Cthulu emerges from a printer. Image created by illustrator Andy Davies. Copyright: The Register

Is there paper in the printer? Yes and it's so neatly wrapped!

On-Call Look at the clock: Friday is here and so, therefore, is On-Call, El Reg's weekly wander down memory lane and into readers' recollections of jobs gone awry. This week, we're going to be like one of those Simpsons in which the family visits another nation. But with a better plot and without lazy stereotyping, thanks to reader “ …
Simon Sharwood, 09 Sep 2016
Africa Studio http://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-137002p1.html

Ten-year-old Windows Media Player hack is the new black, again

Net scum are still finding ways to take down users with a decade-old Windows Media Player attack. The vector is a reborn social engineering hatchet job not seen in years in which attackers convince users to run executable content through Windows Media Player's Digital Rights Management (DRM) functionality. Windows Media …
Darren Pauli, 08 Sep 2016
Notting Hill Carnival dancer. Pic: Shutterstock

Notting Hill Carnival spycams: Met Police rolls out real-time live face-spotting tech

London’s Metropolitan Police will trial an automated facial recognition system to identify people at this weekend's Notting Hill Carnival as the government continues to drag its feet on the use of the technology. This is is only the second time that British cops have openly trialled live automated facial recognition (AFR) …

'Neural network' spotted deep inside Samsung's Galaxy S7 silicon brain

Hot Chips Samsung has revealed the blueprints to its mystery M1 processor cores at the heart of its S7 and S7 Edge smartphones. International versions of the top-end Android mobiles, which went on sale in March, sport a 14nm FinFET Exynos 8890 system-on-chip that has four standard 1.6GHz ARM Cortex-A53 cores and four M1 cores running at …
Chris Williams, 22 Aug 2016

IOActive turns up the most SOHOpeless router so far

It could be the worst router in the world: a cheapie from China that IOActive reckons is completely pwnable all ways from Sunday. Bought by a travelling staffer, Tao Sauvage, the BHU Wi-Fi router looks almost indistinguishable to a surveillance box. As Sauvage writes: “An unauthenticated attacker could bypass authentication, …

Banking system SWIFT was anything but on security, ex-boss claims

You'd think, with the amount of money the SWIFT inter-bank payment system transfers every day, that the group would be strong on security. Not so, says a former head of the organization. The SWIFT organization has been trying to up its security game after a string of high-profile hacking attacks that siphoned off millions from …
Iain Thomson, 18 Aug 2016

NIST wants answers on infosec - your answers

Sometimes, “don't read the comments” just isn't an option – like when you're United States' National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and you're soliciting input for the US government's Commission on Enhancing National Cybersecurity (CENC). The CENC, which was announced back in April, has asked NIST to provide …
Burning money, photo via Shutterstock

Adobe stops software licence audits in Americas, Europe

Adobe has stopped doing software licence audits in most parts of the world, according to Gartner research director Stephen White. White recently blogged about Adobe's decision, writing that “These programs were closed in the North America, Japan and Latin America markets as of November 2015. Closure of the EMEA program is …
Simon Sharwood, 12 Aug 2016

Soylent adds coffee

Food-as-drink startup Soylent has created a new substance called “Coffiest”. It's Soylent's usual story: why bother preparing food when you can just drink glop that has all the nutrients you need? Coffiest adds coffee to the mix, so that those who like to start the day with a jolt can get it in a bottle that also contains 20 …
Simon Sharwood, 11 Aug 2016

BBC detector vans are back to spy on your home Wi-Fi – if you can believe it

Updated The BBC's creepy detector vans will be dragged into the 21st century to sniff Brits' home Wi-Fi networks, claims the UK Daily Telegraph's Saturday splash. From September 1, you'll need a telly licence if you stream catch-up or on-demand TV from the BBC's iPlayer service, regardless if you've got a television set or not – phone …
Chris Williams, 06 Aug 2016
HMRC photo, Gov.uk

HMRC's IR35 tweaks have 90% of UK's IT contractors up in arms

Around 90 per cent of UK government IT contractors will rebel against proposals by HMRC to clamp down on self-employed workers not paying the correct employment taxes. The taxman is currently consulting on whether to shift responsibility for compliance with the intermediaries legislation, known as IR35, from the individual …
Kat Hall, 03 Aug 2016

Domain name bods NetNames netted by CSC Global

Domain biz NetNames has been flogged to US biz services outfit CSC Global for an undisclosed sum. Private Equity biz HgCapital has decided to offload NetNames after taking the publicly-listed outfit private in autumn 2011 for £153m, but it said little else about today's transaction. The deal isn't a massive surprise, as we …
Kat Hall, 02 Aug 2016
An eraser

OK, we've got your data. But we really want to delete it ASAP

Storage is a big deal for IT people and beancounters alike. For the IT team the story is pretty consistent: there's never quite enough, and the users seem to eat it up and an amazing rate. For the finance team it's a seemingly endless queue of IT people asking for funds for yet more storage because the rate of growth in stored …
Dave Cartwright, 02 Aug 2016

Huawei P9 Plus: Leica-toting flagship gets a big brother

Review The P9 Plus deserves to be Huawei’s real flagship of 2016, and given the price tag, it’s a belter. Like the iPhone Plus, it feels like a very different beast to its smaller sibling. In a nutshell, you can save a small fortune by opting for the P9 Plus over an iPhone or Samsung’s Galaxy S7, but you’ll miss out on the latter’s …
Andrew Orlowski, 29 Jul 2016
Punch Card

Microsoft delays Azure updates so you can catch up with the cloud

In the cloud, we're constantly told, we won't have to bother about staying up to date with new versions of stuff. Our service providers will make non-disruptive upgrades for which we'll be non-disruptively grateful. Except when we're not, as Microsoft has just found out with two cloud service upgrades it has had to delay …
Simon Sharwood, 21 Jul 2016
Nexus 6P

Google's Nexii stand tall among Android's insecure swill

Nexus devices are, unsurprisingly, the most secure Androids, says security outfit Duo. The devices are regarded as Google's flagship Android device on account of its operating system running the stock Android open source project (AOSP). Android phones from other manufacturers nearly always add custom modifications and are …
Darren Pauli, 15 Jul 2016
whitehall_648

Shocker: Computer science graduate wins a top UK political job

David Davis MP today becomes the highest-achieving computer science graduate in British politics. Strictly speaking, Davis graduate with a BSc in “Molecular Science/Computer Science” in 1971 from the University of Warwick. He is now the Secretary of State for Exiting the EU (or “SSEE-U”), a freshly-minted post. Davis later …
Andrew Orlowski, 14 Jul 2016

Kotkin on who made Trump and Brexit: Look in the mirror, it's you

Interview Two American writers have attempted to grapple with the rise of “populism” exemplified by Donald Trump and Brexit, with both starting (if not finishing) from the Left. Both Death of the Liberal Class by Chris Hedges and The New Class Conflict by Joel Kotkin both make uncomfortable reading for the complacent chatterati. Both …
Andrew Orlowski, 11 Jul 2016
Pulling the plug

Bank tech boss: Where we're going, we don't need mainframes

Dutch finance giant ING is moving away from mainframes as “aggressively” as it can, rejecting vendors’ hopes that a little sprinkling of Agile dust will give the venerable platform a new lease of life. Speaking at the DevOps Enterprise Summit in London on Thursday, Ron van Kemenade, CIO ING Bank, detailed the bank’s …
Joe Fay, 01 Jul 2016
Everthing is fine says status page

Office 365 falls over in US

Microsoft's Office 365 service appears to be suffering an outage in and around New York City and the US West Coast. User reports from the area, as well as a map from monitoring service DownDetector, show knackered service in the New York and New Jersey areas, plus problems in California and spots of bother elsewhere. Office …
Shaun Nichols, 30 Jun 2016
Communist fist, photo via Shutterstock

ODM for the masses? Facebook's OCP still ain't for you, brother

Go to the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California, and you’ll see a strange contraption cobbled together from commodity motherboards purchased from electronics stores. It’s one of Google’s first production servers, built in 1999 when it didn’t have money to waste on dead-end projects like Wave, NexusQ and Buzz. …
Danny Bradbury, 30 Jun 2016

Facebook crushes Belgian attempt to ban tracking of non-users

The Belgium Privacy Commission has lost its effort to force Facebook to stop tracking non-users of the website when an appeals court ruled it was outside its jurisdiction. Back in November, the social network was ordered by a Belgian court to kill tracking cookies within 48 hours for people not signed up to – or logged into – …
Kieren McCarthy, 29 Jun 2016

Docker taps unikernel brains to emit OS X, Windows public betas

DockerCon Docker will kick off its DockerCon 2016 conference in Seattle this morning with a bunch of announcements: its OS X and Windows Docker clients will be made publicly available as beta software for anyone to try out; out-of-the-box orchestration is coming to Docker 1.12; and integration with Amazon's AWS and Microsoft's Azure is in …
Chris Williams, 20 Jun 2016
Bear attack

Russian government hackers spent a year in our servers, admits DNC

The US Democratic National Committee (DNC) has confirmed that hackers thought to be part of Russian state intelligence have had access to their servers for nearly a year. They have read emails, chat logs, and opposition research documents. The attack was uncovered six weeks ago, after IT admins noticed something strange was …
Iain Thomson, 14 Jun 2016