Articles about Adapt

Sensors, not CPUs, are the tech that swings the smartphone market

A computer without sensors is a pitiful, useless thing. Keyboards are sensors, as are mechanical-optical paper-tape readers, magnetic heads on storage discs, and the logic scanning for ones and zeroes on an ethernet interface. Everything a computer does - outside of calculations - involves a sensor. Despite this, we tend to …
Mark Pesce, 28 Jan 2016
WWI French tank picture via Shutterstock

Apparently we have to give customers the warm fuzzies ... How the heck do we do that?

Analysis “The customer is king” is up there with some of the most overused corporate mantras. But it has now been translated into a new buzzword – Customer Experience, or CX – and a whole industry is evolving on the back of it. The purveyors of enterprise software, cloud services and digital devices would have you believe you can …
Rachel Willcox, 27 Jan 2016

Walmart takes its DevOps platform and piles it high on GitHub

Walmart has delivered on low-price promise and taken a swipe at soon to be arch enemy – by serving its OneOps platform onto Github. The massive grocer – which owns Asda in the UK – promised last year that it would open source the platform, which it is pitching as a way to avoid cloud vendor lock in. It duly announced yesterday …
Joe Fay, 27 Jan 2016
Chakra support in Node.js

Microsoft requests ChakraCore support in main Node.js repository

Microsoft has submitted a pull request that enables Node.js to run with the ChakraCore JavaScript engine, as an optional alternative to the Google-developed V8 engine. Chakra is the JavaScript engine developed for Edge, Microsoft's Windows 10 web browser. In December 2015, the company announced that the key components of …
Tim Anderson, 20 Jan 2016
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Facebook Messenger: All your numbers are belong to us

Facebook started 2016 with the bold claim that it intends to eradicate phone numbers and replace web browsing, but the Social Network has a mountain to climb before Facebook Messenger becomes the centre of our online world. That’s the stated intention of the Zuckerberg empire – to replace all our myriad internet communication …
Bill Ray, 20 Jan 2016
Green Cross Code

Stop, look, listen: Don't be 2016's DevOps roadkill – here's how to survive

Search the term “DevOps” online and you get a plethora of stuff. The problem is not lack of content – the problem is sifting the wheat from the chaff. Navigating your way through can be both daunting and confusing. This in turn makes it a challenge to know where and how to get started. Those purveying DevOps need to offer a …
Bola Rotibi, 15 Jan 2016
Afraid of the dark, image via Shutterstock

Full of fear at work: Blame the boss, or yourself?

Fear is a great motivator. Fear pushes adrenaline. It primes our "fight or flight" response. It primes us for a confrontation. Fear shuts down our higher cognitive functions, priming us for a visceral response, on top of which we layer rationalisation. Fear ensures continued survival of our species in times of dire straits. …
Noah Cantor, 15 Jan 2016
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Improve, automate, rinse and repeat: All aboard the starship DevOps

Steve Ballmer once famously ran around on stage screaming "developers, developers!" You never hear anyone jumping about shouting "sysadmins!" or "quality controllers!". That’s because code conventional wisdom dictates that code trickles down from the ivory tower, while the boys in the engine room make like Scotty in Star Trek, …
Danny Bradbury, 13 Jan 2016

Reverser laments crypto game protection, says wares dead after 2018

A top video-game cracker says cryptographic anti-reverse-engineering technology could put an end to the prolific rate of game piracy. The Chinese reverser, known affectionately as Bird Sister, Phoenix, or Fifi, has published a short blog noting that the encryption technology protecting the popular Just Cause 3 title. " …
Darren Pauli, 07 Jan 2016
Tesla_Roadster

Tegile: Tesla, T4000 and playing the long game on cheap data storage

Analysis No one single thing stands out. When looking over Tegile there is no one special sauce ingredient. It just aims to be a better all-round business than its competitors, which means developing, selling and supporting a mixed media tier, external storage array for business users. Tegile presented its attributes to an IT press …
Chris Mellor, 22 Dec 2015

Firefox-on-Windows users, rejoice: Game of Thrones now in HTML5

Firefox has joined the Netflix community on Windows with the addition of HTML5 video extensions. The box set streaming giant’s HTML5 video player now works with Mozilla’s browser and digital-rights management software from Adobe to police content – Primetime CDM. It means you can stream Netflix to Firefox on a Windows PC …
Gavin Clarke, 18 Dec 2015

Nokia, ARM, twisting Intel bid to reinvent the TCP/IP stack for a 5G era

Nokia and ARM are at the heart of a bid to revamp the ageing TCP/IP stack to make it better suited to networks that need to operate at very high speed and/or low latency. Among the plethora of industry alliances at the intersection of telecoms, IT and IP, this looks like one with a genuine contribution to make to the evolution …
Wireless Watch, 14 Dec 2015
Sunset in Niger, a tree silhouetted against a sunset in the Sahara desert. Photo via Shutterstock

This is how you count all the trees on Earth

The Earth has three trillion trees and this is seven times more than was thought, until very recently, to exist. It is also half the number that existed before humanity went to work on the environment. We can deduce this through algorithms used to crunch reams of photographic data captured by satellite. But the headline figure …
Drew Cullen, 09 Dec 2015

Boffins teach cars to listen for the sound of a wet road

The sound a tyre makes on a wet road could become part of the road safety arsenal, if a proposal submitted to an IEEE publication becomes widespread. Pre-published at ArXiv, the idea comes from a group of German and US boffins, who reckon that deep learning techniques can help cars detect not only that the road is wet, but how …
Lumia 950 XL

Microsoft Lumia 950 and 950XL: Clear thoughts of Continuum with a snazzy camera

Review There’s only one reason you might want to buy either of the new flagship Microsoft Lumias. Straight off the bat, we can tell you it's not the party trick Continuum, where your phone doubles up as an ARM-based PC to run Microsoft Office. Nor is that reason Windows 10 – which is still buggy, bereft of significant new benefits …
Andrew Orlowski, 08 Dec 2015
Speedometer by Nathan E Photography, Flickr under CC2.0

MSFT boffins bust mobile data bottlenecks with iOS app

Microsoft Research boffins in Singapore and India have put up a novel idea: an app designed to identify where a smartphone's downloads are suffering and route around the problem without bothering the network operator. The researchers reckon the mobile network has forgotten one of the prime directives of the Internet: to route …
Developer in a rage

Bringing discipline to development, without causing pain

There’s that question you’ve always wanted to ask in an interview when the dialogue has gone really well and you know you’re about to get offered the job, but you don’t want it anyway. Interviewer: “Great, so do you have any questions that you would like to ask me?” Candidate: “Well, if I’m traveling in a car at the speed of …

Lazy IoT, router makers reuse skeleton keys over and over in thousands of devices – new study

It's what we all assumed, but quietly hoped wasn't quite this bad. Lazy makers of home routers and the Internet of Things are reusing the same small set of hardcoded security keys, leaving them open to hijacking en masse, researchers have warned. In other words, if you can log into one gizmo remotely, you can probably log …
Shaun Nichols, 26 Nov 2015
Bond tries to decipher is tailor

Identifying terrorists: Let's find a value for needle in haystack

IPB So you're looking to stop a terrorist attack. What do you do? The choices are: (a) build the largest haystack about all the population because you know that the needle has to be in there “somewhere”; or (b) have the powers to look at all the relevant smaller haystacks that are around when you have inkling as to what kind of …
Rowing_photo_via_Shutterstock

Working with Asperger's in tech: We're in this together

Comment Some time has passed since my first article on the subject of being an Aspie in the work world. So, I thought it may be time to cover a subject closer to my heart, namely being an Aspie in social settings. Work, after all, isn’t just about what you do – it’s how you interact with people as well. First, let's start with my wife …
Stuart Burns, 09 Nov 2015
Crash test dummy in a wheel chair at the TRL

I survived a head-on crash with driverless cars – and dummies

Geek's Guide I’m driving along the French Riviera, and it’s a challenge. It’s a manual car, but for some reason I can’t hear the engine, which after ten years driving an automatic makes it difficult knowing when to switch gears. Suddenly the pedals start moving themselves, the steering wheel gyrating wildly as it avoids oncoming …
Joe Fay, 02 Nov 2015
Plate spinning routine by Henrik Bothe

'T-shaped' developers are the new normal

Blog When I joined QA nearly eight years ago I did so in a time of wonderfully ordered roles and responsibilities. It was a world of web developers, designer, application programmers and database administrators. Each sat in their own little area worrying about only their little part of the puzzle with clear definitions of …
David Walker, 02 Nov 2015
Google car

Insurance companies must start buying security companies

The Insurance industry encompasses a very odd paradox: it wouldn’t exist without risk, yet does everything in its power to remove any risks for its policy-holders. Insurers only make money if they don’t pay out, and they won’t pay out if they can keep you from doing any of the things they’ve identified as risky. We’re already …
Mark Pesce, 29 Oct 2015
The Shining - blood cascade

'Blood on the carpet' ahead for outsourcers, says analyst research

Spare a thought for those poor multinational outsourcers, who continued to work a lot harder just to maintain the same level of business seen in the last quarter, due to the worldwide trend away from mega deals. According to analyst house ISG, for the third quarter this year, global IT outsourcing spend remained flat at $5.6bn …
Kat Hall, 19 Oct 2015

Daily Mail caught on hooks of Angler exploit kit

Net nasty numero uno, the Angler Exploit Kit, has infected advertising on the Daily Mail's website, causing the site to serve up malware to its readers' machines. A security blog posted by internet security company Malwarebytes reported that a sophisticated malvertising attack had been found afflicting advertisements on …

Interview: Why evolution isn't enough to future-proof your systems

Regcast follow-up After our recent Regcast on the future of your data centre, we locked the studio door before HP’s Craig Partridge and Intel’s Chris Feltham could bolt. In our Regcast they claimed that IT departments will have to behave differently in a hyperconverged world, and so in our after-hours conversation we wanted to know more about …
David Gordon, 13 Oct 2015
The puppets from Team America: World Police gather at a bar for drinks.

Team Microsoft: Device Police... 'Are you pumped? I'm pumped'

Analysis “Someone out there must have a family,” Panos Panay remarked yesterday, surveying his audience of potato-shaped gadget bloggers. An optimistic view, I thought. Panay was presenting Microsoft’s Devices event in New York, an event designed to get bloggers’ juices running. And boy, it did. Years ago, I was in a MacWorld audience …
Andrew Orlowski, 08 Oct 2015

DevOps tools: The beginner's guide to Chef

In the DevOps model, developers and system operators work closely together throughout the software development process to deploy software more frequently and more reliably. Many new third party and proprietary tools have been developed to support automation, measurement and sharing. Chef: "IT automation for speed and …
Kat McIvor, 07 Oct 2015
sony semiconductors

Sony prepares to lop off semiconductor biz

Sony is reorganizing its devices division, and spinning off its semiconductor business. The Japanese electronics giant said that on April 1, 2016, Sony Semiconductor Solutions will begin operating as its own business with manufacturing, R&D, and sales operations. The new business will continue to operate as part of the Sony …
Shaun Nichols, 06 Oct 2015

Hash-tag CompSci: FBI grooms pre-weed teens

The FBI is launching a pilot programme to groom teenage hackers for "the mission" before said hackers start hitting the bong – or get well-paid positions at private sector companies. The pilot programme will be rolled out next autumn, reports the Financial Times (behind paywall), and will see the agency offering computer …
Dusty fan vent

Penny wise and pound foolish: Server hoarders are energy wasters

Sysadmin blog This summer was particularly bad for western Canada, where I live. Electricity costs are soaring and the datacenter air conditioners were going 24 hours a day. There has to be a way to be more efficient. My power bill at home is $250 most months. This is with over half the equipment in my lab out on customer sites for testing …
Trevor Pott, 24 Sep 2015
Intel and Chromat make a bra which breathes

Chipzilla has its knockers … and now they’re cool in this venting sports bra

Chipzilla’s latest move into wearable tech embraces fashion, with a partnership that sees the company jumping into bed with sportswear brand Chromat. The companies have produced a sports bra which opens vents when it senses a certain level of heat and sweat. Chromat said its designs are based on “Becca McCharen’s theoretical …
Simon Rockman, 16 Sep 2015
Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain

Stealth service – Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain

Game Theory Whether fearing negative reviews, spoilers, or to wrestle back some control on reports of how much Hideo Kojima's name appears in the game, getting a copy of The Phantom Pain to review before it shipped was akin to striking black gold in the American West. Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain Keeping an eye out Thankfully …
Mike Plant, 07 Sep 2015
2001: A Space Odyssey

Cognitive computing: What can and can’t we do, and should lipreading be banned?

Next year will mark the 60th anniversary of the Dartmouth Artificial Intelligence (AI) Conference. That conference, which marked the birth of AI research, explored whether machines could simulate any aspect of human intelligence. Since then, Google has developed a self-driving car, computers can type what you speak, and phones …
Danny Bradbury, 04 Sep 2015
head of 50s-style robot

The future of IT is – to deliver automation. Discuss

Sysadmin blog You don't have to be a large enterprise to benefit from technology, though access to seemingly endless resources tends to help. I've worked in SMB IT my whole life and automation changes everything at this level. So many things that reasonably should be automated simply aren't in the SMB world. We rely on fallible humans. …
Trevor Pott, 01 Sep 2015
DataSphere_diagram

Primary Data's DataSphere storage silo-masking software revealed

Primary Data, Fusion-io founder David Flynn's startup, is unveiling its DataSphere product: universal data access software that masks multiple hardware and multiple vendor silos, to provide a single virtualized data sphere containing different tiers of data. We'll start with a conceptual diagram and then explain the bits as we …
Chris Mellor, 27 Aug 2015
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Canadians taking to spying on their spies

Comment As Canadians settle in for the longest general election campaign since 1867, some uncomfortable incidents that had been ignored by commercial media outlets are gaining new exposure. Allegations that Canadian spooks are spying on protesters have become a hot topic online. The result is that Canada's online civil liberties …
Trevor Pott, 22 Aug 2015
Redfish Logo

Redfish aims to reel in data centre tin shifters hook, line and sinker

The Redfish API has hit version 1.0, signalling a new era of co-operation among vendors regarding the increasingly hot topic of data centre management. Redfish is the result of efforts by the Distributed Management Task Force (DMTF) to bring all physical equipment within a data centre together with one API to manage them. Data …
Trevor Pott, 20 Aug 2015
storage arrays superimposed on cloudy sky

Seagate scoops Dot Hill for US$694 million

Seagate has announced it will acquire storage outfit Dot Hill for US$694 million. The canned statement announcing the deal says “Dot Hill’s external storage array-based systems and software products will complement and expand Seagate’s storage systems offerings and be offered as part of Seagate’s Cloud Systems and Electronics …
Simon Sharwood, 19 Aug 2015
Bookshelf in the British Library basement

Borg blacklist assimilates Cryptolocker domain name generators

Cisco has developed a means to accurately identify the fleeting pop-up domains used by some of the world's worst malware. The platform builds a reputation score that is in part based on word sources including more than 60 dictionaries, Census data and Alexa top 1000 domains. Using multiple sources helps to identify the …
Darren Pauli, 10 Aug 2015
Windsurfer mid-flight (3CX logo in sail)

SDN: It's living the dream – and just using what you've got

Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Functions Virtualisation (NFV) are growing in importance. Genuine interest around them is growing fast, faster even than the hype would indicate. This is having some curious knock-on effects. Networking vendors are cautious about SDN and NFV, as both trends threaten to commoditise …
Trevor Pott, 04 Aug 2015

Google, Adobe barricade Flash against hacker hordes – we peek inside

Google's team of computer security gurus have described the anti-hacker defenses they've helped Adobe add to Flash Player. It's hoped that these mechanisms will thwart or frustrate miscreants' attempts to exploit programming bugs in the software, and thus hopefully prevent attackers from hijacking victims' PCs and Macs. The …
Chris Williams, 17 Jul 2015
Ship scrapyard photo via Shutterstock

Why the USS NetApp is a doomed ship

Comment NetApp last month changed chief executives, and in May laid off just over 500 people. Some believe this is the start of great new things and a turnaround for NetApp. I disagree. To put this as bluntly as I can, NetApp is most likely doomed. Getting rid of the CEO won't save it. NetApp's problem is that the culture of: "The …
Trevor Pott, 09 Jul 2015
Scotty - Star Trek

I cannae dae it, cap'n! Why I had to quit the madness of frontline IT

Sysadmin blog It took a massive hack attack against the United States government resulting in the theft of up to 14 million 21.5 million records to make me realise why I want to quit working in IT. Over the past year I've significantly drawn down my involvement in day-to-day IT operations, and I'm much happier for it. The US Office of …
Trevor Pott, 09 Jul 2015
management cio2

Never mind the redundancies as Capita splashes cash on Barrachd

Everyone's favourite outsourcer Capita has snapped up business intelligence outfit and IBM VAR Barrachd for an undisclosed pile of cash. The 38-strong Scottish biz develops bespoke BI software in the financial services, energy, and higher education sectors. Barrachd was founded in 2007 and its name means "more" in Gaelic – a …
Kat Hall, 09 Jul 2015
Unicorn. Detail from Domenico Zampieri fresco in Rome

Tech bubble? Pah. IPOs just return cash to early-stage investors

Worstall on Wednesday A internal presentation from Andreessen Horowitz aimed at its limited partners, that has to be taken with the appropriate shovelful of salt, has emerged – and the insights it reveals into the “tech bubble” are absolutely fascinating. U.S. Technology Funding -- What's Going On? from a16z Take it with a shovelful of salt …
Tim Worstall, 08 Jul 2015

Firefox to speed up dev cycle, go multi-process, rip and replace UI – soon

Mozilla is planning big changes in how it builds its Firefox web browser, including speeding up its release schedule and – in the long term – getting rid of some of the Mozilla-specific technologies that have traditionally been used to build the browser's UI and add-ons. The decisions were discussed at Moz's "Coincidental Work …
Neil McAllister, 07 Jul 2015

Americans in Europe like using Wi-Fi calling, Ericsson discovers

Research from Ericsson shows that people like using Wi-Fi calling, the service which can act as a replacement for a mobile phone network. The big thing which differentiates Wi-Fi calling from other forms of VoIP is that it’s part of the IMS 3GPP standard. It doesn’t need any apps and ties in neatly to your phone number, …
Simon Rockman, 07 Jul 2015

Blurred lines: How cloud computing is reshaping the IT workforce

Sysadmin blog From every angle, developers are the key to the public cloud. Unfortunately, today's developers often aren't up to the challenge and frequently end up being as much of a roadblock as operations administrators. New breeds of technologists are required, bringing new ways of thinking to using the emerging infrastructure superpowers …
Trevor Pott, 07 Jul 2015
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Will rising CO2 damage the world's oceans? NOT SO MUCH – new boffinry

Those who fear that the oceans and their ability to support life on Earth may be doomed by rising CO2 – take heart! A recent scientific study shows that one of the basic engines of the ocean, namely the life cycle of phytoplankton, will probably not be disrupted by the rising levels of carbon dioxide to be expected later this …
Lewis Page, 03 Jul 2015