Articles about 16 Year Olds

Rebuilt Bombe Bletchley Park, photo copyrighted mubsta.com

GCHQ releases teen-friendly code-busting app

British surveillance agency GCHQ has launched its first app today in the hopes of encouraging 14- to 16-year-olds to get interested in cryptography. "Cryptoy" was developed by STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) students on an industrial year placement at GCHQ and was a hit at the Cheltenham Science Festival. GCHQ …
Lindsay Dodgson, 12 Dec 2014
Sydney Opera House Hackathon logo

Innovation agenda's code for kids plan still a work in progress

The ”Coding across the curriculum” plan included in Australia's “Industry Innovation and Competitiveness Agenda” is yet to be developed, and is yet to be targeted at particular students or schools. The AU$3.5m plan was announced last week, just two days after a review of Australia's national curriculum recommended a recently- …
Simon Sharwood, 21 Oct 2014
The Register breaking news

Welsh council's unused mountain of 2,400 laptops

A Welsh council kept 2,400 laptops, which were supposed to be used by school pupils, in storage for at least a year because it couldn't figure out what to do with the kit. Torfaen County Borough Council bought a batch of 8,642 laptops in March last year for itself, Monmouthshire council and Newport council. Torfaen footed the …
The modified Raspberry Pi board

Cambridge Uni publishes free Pi-OS baking course

Cambridge University has joined the ranks of terribly prestigious universities giving computer science classes away online, releasing a 12-step course teaching how to create what it calls a "basic terminal Operating System" for the Raspberry Pi. To create the OS you’ll need YAGARTO Tools and YAGARTO GNU ARM, a Raspberry Pi (not …
Simon Sharwood, 03 Sep 2012
The Register breaking news

IDLENESS sees Brits haemorrhage cash to mobe firms

Almost 20 million Brits are losing money by sticking with their existing mobile phone operators because it's convenient, according to a survey by Which? Mobile. Which? found that 44 per cent of participants had never changed provider and 31 per cent hadn't done so in the last two years, often because they thought it would be a …
The Register breaking news

Social networks must police kids' profiles, says EC

Social network sites must ensure that children's profiles are visible only to the child's friends and cannot be found on a search engine, the European Commission has said. The Commission adopted its stance after a survey (13-page/198KB PDF) found that an increasing number of children were flouting social network age limits to …
OUT-LAW.COM, 21 Apr 2011
The Register breaking news

Teens who spend time online not dorks after all – study

News today which upsets the stereotype of teenagers who spend a lot of time online or otherwise fooling with computers: rather than being lonely dorks with poor social skills who seldom leave their bedrooms, such kids are in fact more likely to get squiffy, have sex and even to take drugs than their less tech-savvy peers. The …
Lewis Page, 27 Apr 2011
The Register breaking news

Boffins turn Bunsen burners on Frank Skinner

"Science isn’t fun. It’s just maths in fancy dress," wrote TV presenter Frank Skinner in the Times on Friday, and it's earned a gentle rebuke from the Royal Society of Chemistry's chief executive Richard Pike. The RCS caustically calls Skinner a "comedian" only between inverted commas*. But Pike says he may be onto something. …
Andrew Orlowski, 05 May 2010
The Register breaking news

Brown promises no change to basic tax rate

Prime minister Gordon Brown said there will be no rise in the basic rate of 20 per cent tax should Labour win the election. Brown pledged to stay for a full five years and said the party had chosen an increase in National Insurance in order to protect public services. He claimed the Conservative party had failed to either make …
John Oates, 08 Apr 2010
The Register breaking news

UK employers sharpen job axe

Employers expect a dismal time ahead in the jobs market because of a rise in redundancies accompanied by a downturn in recruitment. According to the latest Labour Market Outlook survey, 29 per cent of businesses expect to hire new staff before the end of September – that’s half as many compared to the same period in 2004 when …
Kelly Fiveash, 11 Aug 2008
Pirates ahoy!

Street-savvy Microsoft tries to pop the pimply face of piracy

Microsoft has tagged schoolkids as the UK's worst culprits for illegally downloading files from the net. The company, in its latest swoop on software piracy, today put out the results of a new study - dubbed Real Thing - which was based on a survey of just 270 children and 1,200 adults aged 16 and above. It found that 54 per …
Kelly Fiveash, 15 Jul 2008
The Register breaking news

Safer Internet Day fights online foolhardiness

Young surfers are being encouraged to practise safe computing and use common sense online on Safer Internet Day today. Safer Internet Day is a worldwide user education initiative designed to "promote safer and more responsible use of online technology and mobile phones, especially amongst children and young people". The official …
John Leyden, 09 Feb 2010
The Register breaking news

Forget passports - teachers and kids are the new ID card targets

Teachers and 16 year olds are the favoured 'soft targets' for the redesigned ID card scheme rollout, according to an Identity & Passport Service planning document seen by The Register. As suggested in leaks last weekend, IPS now plans to soft-pedal fingerprints and - astoundingly - it seems on the point of abandoning the notion …
John Lettice, 29 Jan 2008
The Register breaking news

Shattered teens subsisting on 'junk sleep'

Researchers have fingered electronic gadgets as the primary cause of the UK's kids simply not getting enough kip, the BBC reports. The Sleep Council polled 1,000 teenagers, and almost a quarter 'fessed up to falling asleep" watching TV, listening to music or with other equipment still running, more than once a week". Pretty …
Lester Haines, 28 Aug 2007
The Register breaking news

Suprise at spelling snafu sanctions

Proof that the revised maxim "If you can't beat 'em, fuck it all off and have some pie" is increasingly the norm reaches us today, as a senior university lecturer throws his hands aloft and declares a spelling amnesty. According to the Times, Dr Ken Smith of Buckinghamshire New University* suggests a list of 20 common mistakes …
Sarah Bee, 07 Aug 2008
The Register breaking news

Mobile phones disrupt teenagers' sleep

Mobile phones are having a major impact on the quality of sleep of a growing number of adolescents. Text messaging on mobile phones is affecting the quality of sleep of almost half of 16 year olds, a Belgian study published in the Journal of Sleep Research says. Many teenagers leave their mobile phone on while they are asleep …
Jan Libbenga, 17 Sep 2003
The Register breaking news

Junk food ads target net

New rules banning TV ads for junk food during programmes aimed at the under-16s will force firms to punt their wares to kids via mobile phones and the internet, the Children's Food Campaign has warned. The new regulations came into force yesterday, and the campaign's Richard Watts claimed that purveyors of unhealthy fare are …
Lester Haines, 02 Jan 2008
channel

Beer fingerprints to go UK-wide

The government is funding the roll out of fingerprint security at the doors of pubs and clubs in major English cities. Funding is being offered to councils that want to have their pubs keep a regional black list of known trouble makers. The fingerprint network installed in February by South Somerset District Council in Yeovil …
Mark Ballard, 20 Oct 2006
The Register breaking news

Believe your own hype - always

In our third extract from Paul Carr's book Bringing Nothing to the Party, the nascent net-botherer muses on one particularly irksome and precocious flash in the dot com pan... During the post-bubble years, between 2000 and 2004, the entire dot com industry was in turmoil. No one could agree whether we were seeing an industry in …
Paul Carr, 22 Oct 2008
The Register breaking news

Teens worth £3bn in online spending

Online shops are ignoring the potential of the teenage market, says new research. According to a report from KPMG, 80 per cent of 12 to 16 year olds want to buy stuff on the Net. While individual teens don't have much cash, as a group they are worth £3 billion a year, says the professional services firm. There are many hoops …
Lucy Sherriff, 19 Jul 1999
The Register breaking news

Games CEO finds himself reluctant warez hero

When Stardock CEO Brad Wardell released his game sequel Galactic Civilizations II recently, he had no idea he'd find himself mistakenly hailed as a poster child for the anti-copyright lobby. Or that a DRM company that makes copy protection for games would post details of where they could download illicit copies of his game. …
Andrew Orlowski, 12 Mar 2006
The Register breaking news

Hackers drive us crackers, says FBI

The FBI said it is "a little bit frustrated" that its Web site is still down more than a week after they pulled the plug following an orchestrated attack by hackers. At a conference yesterday officials revealed they too were at a loss as to why the IBM-powered FBI site was still down. Although the hackers didn't actually breach …
Tim Richardson, 04 Jun 1999
The Register breaking news

British Columbia to limit sale of violent video games

The government of Canada's British Columbia province is seeking to enact a law that would force games developers to have their software rated and sold as if it were a movie. The proposed legislation, recently announced by BC's Attorney General, Graeme Bowbrick, will see the territory essentially adopt the US' Entertainment …
Tony Smith, 20 Mar 2001