Original URL: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/06/07/apple_pulls_iron_curtain_register_iwatch_russia/

Apple pulls back the iRon curtain to register iWatch trademark in Russia

Fruity firm may be Putin its new tech on Russian wrists

By Jasper Hamill

Posted in Hardware, 7th June 2013 07:04 GMT

Apple has reportedly registered an iWatch trademark in Russia, providing the clearest indication yet that it will soon release a wearable computer disguised as a timepiece.

However, the fruity firm might be in a for a fight, because a wristwatch seller which runs a website called i-watch.ru has already registered the trademark in Russia. A court will need to repeal this trademark if Cupertinoski wants to claim it.

According to the newspaper Izvestia, Apple has applied for two trademarks for the device. The report said two claims have been filed with the Russian Federal Service for Intellectual Property (Rospatent) office. The applications were made under the categories of Class 9, which covers computers and peripherals, and Class 14, which includes watches.

Rumours that Apple is designing a new type of watch have been swirling for some months, but Cupertino's secrecy policy - which is the polar opposite of glasnost - means that nothing has been officially announced.

Fanbois starting ululating in joy after Corning, designers of the super tough Gorilla Glass, unveiled their new flexible Willow Glass, which could potentially be used to make an iWatch. When Apple then reportedly trademarked the name iWatch in Jamiaca, fanbois began boiling over with excitement.

The fruity firm often registers trademarks in the Caribbean, because records are not easily searchable online and the claims can later be used to bolster further applications in different countries.

It is not yet known what the point of an iWatch would actually be. Some fanbois have suggested it will monitor fitness or store music, while others suggest it could receive text messages or tweets.

A few clever people have even suggested it might tell the time, something that the BBC's website can no longer do following complaints about their clock's accuracy. ®