Original URL: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/09/03/apple_adds_siii_to_us_suit/

Now Apple wants Samsung S III, Galaxy Notes off the shelves too

Probably also dusting off patents on fire, the wheel, etc.

By Brid-Aine Parnell

Posted in Phones, 3rd September 2012 10:29 GMT

Apple has now claimed Samsung's flagship gadgets the Galaxy S III and the Galaxy Note infringe its mobile phone patents in a SECOND lawsuit in the US.

In separate legal action running in parallel to the epic trial that concluded last month, the iPhone maker has now listed 21 Sammy phones and tablets as devices that allegedly step on eight of its protected designs.

"Rather than innovate and develop its own technology and a unique Samsung style for its smart phone and tablet computer products, Samsung has chosen to copy Apple’s technology, user interface, and innovative style in its phone, media player, and tablet computer products," the iThing kingpin claimed in its latest filing.

Apple has added the latest Samsung mobes - the Galaxy S III and Note - and the latest tablets - the Galaxy Note 10.1 and the Tab 7.0 Plus - to the second lawsuit, which will attempt to get the Android-powered gear banned in the US and win damages. The products were launched by Samsung between August 2011 and last month.

The fruity firm already won a $1bn payout from the patent trial that finished two weeks ago, and has proposed bans on earlier Sammy stuff after the jury found in its favour. After a hotly contested battle, the panel took just three days to decide that the South Korean firm's older phones and tablets had infringed on Apple's designs.

Apple applied to get permanent bans on sales of the Galaxy S II and other phones sorted out as soon as possible, but Judge Lucy Koh has decided to hear the arguments on that when she sorts through the rest of the firms' post-trial motions in early December.

Those motions could include requests from Apple for its payout, and pleas from Samsung to overturn the jury's verdict. The South Korean firm will also petition to get a decision on the banning orders on its products postponed until after it appeals the verdict, which it will do if the judge refuses to overturn it.

The combination of that case and Apple's second suit could give Samsung a very unhappy Christmas, clearing US shelves of its products during the lucrative holiday season with preliminary bans and permanent injunctions. ®