Original URL: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/03/12/idc_cases_big_data/

IDC: Big data biz worth $16.9 BILLION by 2015

Up from $3.2bn in 2010 ...

By Timothy Prickett Morgan

Posted in HPC, 12th March 2012 17:22 GMT

How big is the big data business? That depends on how you dice and slice it.

The box-counters at IDC have cooked up a very precise and formal definition of big data that will keep everything from being thrown into the big data pot. To some ways of thinking, big data is just the new ERP for a webby world, and to others it is just the next logical extension of the back-office systems that have been created for the past four decades on systems of various kinds.

IDC says there are three kinds of metrics for big data systems it is using in its market analysis.

When you look at the servers, storage, networks, software, and services that comprise this big data market as defined by IDC, you get a market that was worth $3.2bn in 2010 and that is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 39.4 per cent over five years to hit $16.9bn by 2015. That growth rate, says IDC, is seven times higher than that of the overall IT market over the same five-year span.

"While software and services make up the bulk of the market opportunity through 2015, infrastructure technology for big data deployments is expected to grow slightly faster at 44 per cent CAGR," said Benjamin Woo, program vice president for storage systems at IDC, in a statement accompanying the big data market analysis. "Storage, in particular, shows the strongest growth opportunity, growing at 61.4 per cent CAGR through 2015. The significant growth rate in revenue is underscored by the large number of new open source projects that drive infrastructure investments."

IDC estimates that the server portion of the big data market is growing a little more slowly than the market at large, with 27.3 per cent growth compounded over the five years, compared to 34.2 per cent for software and 61.4 per cent for storage.

The market researcher believes further that there will be an increase in the use of big data appliances in the coming years as well as more customers outsourcing their big data jobs or relying on cloudy infrastructure from third parties to chew on their monster data. The shortage of experts in various big data software technologies and in those who know how to do analysis on the data once it has been chewed will encourage vendors to create cloud-based services that do the chewing on behalf of customers. No matter how jumpy some customers might be about the security of data that leaves their firewalls, if there is a run on big data talent, they may have no choice but to jump to a cloudy data munching service if they want to stay within a budget. ®