Original URL: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/06/16/eclipse_ganymede_overview/

Eclipse projects squeeze into record Summer fun pack

Refined but bloated

By Phil Manchester

Posted in Developer, 16th June 2008 05:02 GMT

The Eclipse Foundation's annual code blitz - this year under the name Ganymede - kicks off at the end of this month with 24 Eclipse projects co-ordinating their new releases.

Now in its third year, this annual big push keeps getting bigger. Ganymede is Eclipse's largest co-ordinate release of updated projects to-date, beating last year's update by three.

While this will suit the practical and commercial purposes of some, because it ensures integration and fewer bugs between multiple projects, the sheer number of updates here will fuel concerns that Eclipse is becoming bloated.

So what can we expect from Ganymede? Most upgrades to the integrated development environment (IDE) are continuations from last year's Europa release. There are, though also a couple of new ones deserving attention and a nod to claims that Eclipse is hard to use.

Most of Eclipse's main components will be upgraded to support Eclipse 3.4 in Ganymede - introducing a panoply of new features many of which are aimed at improving usability. Eclipse has been regularly criticized for its lack of usability compared to rival IDE NetBeans and recent calls to improve usability appear to be getting through to Eclipse managers.

Version 3.4 of Eclipse sees a number of changes at the API level and piecemeal improvements to several areas - although it seems any major changes are to be reserved for Eclipse 4.0, which is due in 2010.

Vital statistics

This year will see the first full release of the Eclipse Packaging Project (EPP) that aims to make it easier to download appropriate sets of components for Eclipse developers based on a user profile. Version 1.0 of EPP features Usage Data collector (UDC) that will generate statistics on how the various components of Eclipse are being used by developers. Data gathered by UDC includes loaded bundles, commands accessed via shortcuts and actions invoked via menus and toolbars. All Ganymede release components will include UDC.

Two projects stand out. Subversive - a plug-in for CollabNet's Subversion version control package - appears for the first time in a synchronized release. Subversion is reckoned to be the leading version control and software configuration management (SCM) tool and this update comes after CollabNet joined the Eclipse programme last year.

The Eclipse Rich AJAX Platform (RAP), which enables Eclipse to be used for building rich web applications, is also included. First released in October 2007, Eclipse RAP is an important part of Eclipse's expansion into run-time components. It is similar to the Eclipse Rich Client Platform (RCP). But instead of running on a local desktop, RAP uses the RAP Widget Toolkit (RWT), a special version of the Standard Widget Toolkit (SWT), to execute on a server.

Older projects will also see new features both to improve usability and to bring them into line with Eclipse 3.4.

Version 2.3 of Business Intelligence Reporting Tools (BIRT) gets improved support for JavaScript and a bunch of usability improvements such as easier formatting, crosstab enhancements and prototype integration of DTP graphical query.

Version 5.0 of C/C++ Development Tools (CDT) benefits from a bunch of usability improvements and a new refactoring engine.

The latest version of the Dynamic Languages Tool Kit (DLTK), which first appeared in last year's Europa release, includes support for Ruby and Tcl - but Python and JavaScript users will have to wait for later releases.

Various components of the Device Software Developer Platform (DSDP) have been upgraded, with changes including a first glimpse of the DSDP Native Application Builder (NAB) and support for embedded applications development.

The Graphical Editing Framework (GEF) release 3.4 gets a redesigned user interface and support for the Eclipse Visualization Toolkit.

Upgrades to Eclipse's Modeling Development Tools (MDT), meanwhile, are aimed at improving usability. The Ganymede release includes a range of upgrades for the Test and Performance Tools Platform (TPTP) with support for Java 1.6 and for parallel test suite execution.

Finally, version 3.0 of the Web Tools Platform (WTP) boosts Eclipse's support for Java and JavaScript with a lengthy list of new options to support Java Enterprise Edition (JEE) and Enterprise Java Beans (EJB).

All eyes on 2010

As you can see, there's something for everyone here. Eclipse is generally helping individuals and ISVs that rely on multiple projects for their work, by providing a co-ordinated release that irons out bugs and ensures timely - rather than staggered - releases. That's a good thing.

We can probably look forward to next summer's version update adding yet more projects to the mix. All eyes, though, will be on 2010 with version 4.0, which will see how far Eclipse is willing to go in either trimming things back, cleaning up or going modular. In the meantime, you'll have to content yourself with general usability improvements but a growing code base.®