Original URL: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/10/10/god_blog/

Blogging 'un-Christian' - shock

The Confusion of Tongues

By Andrew Orlowski

Posted in Media, 10th October 2006 18:05 GMT

Blathering on blogs is un-Christian, an Evangelical church has warned.

"Blogging has become a socially accepted practice - just as are dating seriously too young, underage drinking and general misbehaving," notes the monthly of the Reformed Church of God, Ambassador Youth.

Blogging "often makes the blogger feel good or makes him feel as if his opinion counts - when it is mostly mindless blather!" notes Kevin D Denee.

"People will now do and say things that should only be done in private, or, frankly, should not be said or done at all," rues Denee.

"Propriety, decorum and decency are not elements considered on blogs. People simply blurt things out, without considering the contents or consequences."

The Church members dismisses the justification that blogging is theraputic. Almost half of bloggers say they blog as therapy - the most popular reason cited. (See The Hive Mind has spoken: "I Need Help!". But its mostly the mindlessness that bothers the author.

"Much of this is simply blathering on blogs - mindless words and idle communication. Blogs can be summed up as people talking about almost anything, but really nothing. There is no purpose to much of the contents - no direction."

This, we learn conflicts with the advise given in Proverbs 17:27-28, which tells us:

He who has knowledge spares his words, and a man of understanding is of calm spirit.

Even a fool is counted wise when he holds his peace; when he shuts his lips, he is considered perceptive.

Fair enough.

Blogging is also dangerous because of its addictive quality, we're told.

"Is this article saying that every blog in the world is wrong? No, of course not! Again, there are some professionals and specialists who use blogs to serve a proper purpose."

"All that said, you can—and SHOULD—maintain friends the “old-fashioned” way, through actual personal contact, as well as letter writing, emailing or instant messaging".

So there you go.

Thanks to the Reverend G. Kewney for the link. More here