Original URL: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/04/10/internet_video_boom/

IDC forecasts internet video surge

$1.7bn industry by 2010

By OUT-LAW.COM

Posted in Broadband, 10th April 2006 09:13 GMT

The US is on the verge of a boom in internet video services, fuelled by an increase in the amount of premium content made available online, according to a new report from IDC. The analysts predict that the services will generate over $1.7bn in revenue by 2010.

According to IDC, the market for internet video services began its dramatic acceleration in 2005 as content owners, once unwilling to offer their products online, started to experiment with digital distribution as a way to complement and enhance their existing business models and to stem illegal P2P file-sharing and piracy.

It highlights the television networks' decision to offer episodes from new shows as well as old as significant in sparking interest in internet video. Television content is expected to be an integral component to revenue growth throughout the forecast period.

"The internet video market has huge upside. With that upside, however, comes the risk to content owners of cannibalising existing revenue streams," IDC associate research analyst Josh Martin said. "In order to properly take advantage of this emerging market, content owners to aggregators to consumer electronics manufacturers must understand the challenges the market faces and how to overcome them."

Key drivers for the adoption of internet video include the expansion of premium content offerings online and the emergence of home networking solutions that allow consumers to more easily view internet content on their televisions. As services become increasingly common, content owners will leverage internet video to complement their existing revenue streams and to generate additional revenue from archived content and new content created specifically for the service, according to IDC.

The firm expects that content owners will migrate toward three basic service types. Advertising-based services will remain the dominant type of internet video service, although its share of total market revenue will decline as a la carte services, buoyed by consumer familiarity with iTunes, grow dramatically over the next two to three years.

Subscription-based services, on the other hand, will experience steady growth throughout the forecast period, enhanced somewhat by the emergence of home networking solutions that make subscriptions more appealing to consumers.

But the firm warns that in order to sustain the momentum gathered in 2005 and maximise opportunities for success, content owners and service providers will need to overcome several important problems, including licensing issues, inadequate video search, competitive challenges, and the issue of how to move content beyond the PC.

IDC believes companies involved from the creation to distribution of content will have to partner with others across the value chain to create appealing, flexible services that will evolve into viable businesses.

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