Original URL: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/06/29/wanadoo_orange_rebrand/

Wanadoo brand to be scrapped

The future's Orange from now on

By Tim Richardson

Posted in Broadband, 29th June 2005 12:04 GMT

The name Wanadoo is to be consigned to the scrap heap as part of yet another rebranding exercise at the ISP formerly know as Freeserve.

Next year Wanadoo will ditch its logo and rebrand under the Orange livery as part of a "simplified brand architecture" announced by parent France Telecom today.

The name change comes a little over a year after FT decided to ditch the name Freeserve - its ISP in the UK - and replace it with Wanadoo.

For FT, it means that the mobile phone outfit will become the umbrella brand for all mobile, broadband and other converged telecoms services.

As services continue to converge, it means that punters will be able to get their mobile, broadband, video-on-demand and fixed line services all from the same company charged on the same bill.

For customers in the UK, it's yet more confusion as the ISP takes on yet another identity.

The UK is first in line for the makeover which should take place in 2006. Said FT in a statement today: "Over the next 18 months, Orange should become the Group's international commercial brand for mobile, broadband and multiplay offerings, as well as for all Enterprise businesses. The company's name remains unchanged."

A spokeswoman for Orange confirmed the name change, telling us: "The Wanadoo name is to be replaced by Orange. Orange will become group's brand for broadband, mobile and multiplay.

While a spokesman for Wanadoo UK, which used to be known as Freeserve but will now be Orange, added: "A single, integrated brand strategy will enable the company to compete more effectively against our competitors. It will help to accelerate the momentum of the FT Group's ambition to become the leader in convergence. We will have a single brand with global clout." ®

Related stories

Freeserve airbrushed from history
Freeserve confirms Wanadoo makeover
Freeserve dismisses rebranding reports