26th > February > 2013 Archive

The Register breaking news

DHS bigwig 'adamantly opposed' to degree fetishism

RSA 2013 HR and in-house recruitment types should get rid of the myopic idea that to work in IT you must have been to university, says a Department of Homeland Security honcho.
Jack Clark, 26 Feb 2013
Bacteria cultured on a mobile phone

Boffin shows pics of germs grown on SPOTTY STUDENTS' MOBES

PICS Dr Simon Park, a senior lecturer in molecular biology at the University of Surrey, has unleashed untold horror on the world in the form of photos of germ colonies on mobile phones.
Simon Sharwood, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news

India launch puts Canadian microsats into orbit

With India’s successful PSLV (Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle) lift-off on February 26, Canada is now boasting the deployment of the world’s first dedicated asteroid-hunting satellite.

Climate scientists link global warming to extreme weather

There has been a healthy debate in the scientific community about the linkage, if any, between the recent spate of extreme weather events and the ongoing increase in global temperatures. Now a group of researchers reports they've uncovered an atmospheric mechanism that lends credence to the argument that, yes, global warming is to blame for at least some of our increasingly mucked-up weather.
Rik Myslewski, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news
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Ruby 2.0.0 adds syntax sparkle, boosts performance

The Ruby community announced the first stable release of Ruby 2.0 on Sunday, exactly 20 years to the day since Ruby creator Yukihiro "Matz" Matsumoto first conceived of the language on February 24, 1993.
Neil McAllister, 26 Feb 2013

McAfee dumps signatures and proclaims an (almost) end to botnets

RSA 2013 Signature-based malware identification has been around since the dawn of the computer security industry, but McAfee has said it's dumping the system – or rather, adapting it – in an upgraded security suite which will (it claims) virtually eliminate susceptibility to botnets.
Iain Thomson, 26 Feb 2013
Barbed wire surrounding communications tower

BBC World Service in a jam as China blocks broadcasts

The BBC has claimed China is blocking shortwave radio broadcasts of its World Service, in what could be retaliation for its attempts to cover the recent hacking allegations against the People’s Liberation Army (PLA).
Phil Muncaster, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news

North Korean citizens told: Socialist haircuts are a thing... go get some

The North Korean government has issued haircut guidance for its citizens and chosen 28 hairstyles it deems "appropriate" for members of the single-party state. According to the WantChina Times, photos of the 28 haircuts recommended by the totalitarian regime (pictured below) have been issued to salons around the country. The cuts were chosen for being comfortable and resistant to Western influences.
Anna Leach, 26 Feb 2013
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Japanese gov builds APT database to study targeted attack info

The Japanese government will respond to the increasing threats from targeted cyber attacks by building a centralised advanced persistent threat (APT) database designed to aggregate threat intelligence so it can be shared with domestic security organisations and foreign governments.
Phil Muncaster, 26 Feb 2013

Who'll do a Red Hat on open-source storage?

Storagebod Are we heading for a Linux moment in the storage world where an open-source "product" truly breaks out and causes the major vendors a headache?
StorageBod, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news

No mobile signal? Blame hippies and their eco-friendly walls

MWC 2013 Mobile networks are losing as much as 88 per cent of their bandwidth thanks to energy-efficient walls and windows, we're told. The insulation seals in the heat and keep out the coverage, according to a company flogging a solution.
Bill Ray, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news

Welcome to our Wi-Fi: Devicescape reinvents landing page

Wi-Fi leeching tech Devicescape has reinvented the Wi-Fi landing page, popping a notification into the Android menu to alert those users for whom the internet is no longer the web.
Bill Ray, 26 Feb 2013
management cloud7

Concerned about sophisticated storage solutions?

Live today The storage architecture you will need for a private cloud deployment will probably be very different to what you have today. So what level of performance, and what attributes does it need to have? And how do you migrate from what you have now into what you have next? What will you need to spend, and what are the common mistakes that you want to avoid? How much storage do you need and how will you budget for pooled / shared storage in your private cloud?
David Gordon, 26 Feb 2013
PernixData VSA
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Stealthy upstart PernixData mutters incantation... turns flash into SAN

PernixData has opened its kimono, a little - but really we know little more than that it will provide flash storage facilities to virtual machines.
Chris Mellor, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news
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Ericsson and SAP Megazord has no need for your PUNY human phonecalls

MWC 2013 Ericsson has signed a deal with SAP to collaborate on bringing about the rise of the machines, with ongoing help from Gemalto, by combining into an unstoppable Megazord capable of communicating with 50 billion acolytes.
Bill Ray, 26 Feb 2013
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Xyratex thrusts a Lustre cluster knuckleduster at Intel's bluster

Storage biz Xyratex is polishing its high-performance computing credentials by acquiring the Lustre trademark, logo, website and associated intellectual property from Oracle. Xyratex said it will support Lustre's community-oriented development.
Chris Mellor, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news

Nexus 1 put in orbit to prove 'in space, no one can hear you scream'

Surrey-based space boffins have put a Google Nexus 1 into orbit to see how an Android phone copes with the rigours of space - and whether they can hear it scream.
Bill Ray, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news
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Fujitsu to get oldsters out the house and thoroughly caned

MWC 2013 Fujitsu exhibited a prototype of its GPS-enabled walking stick yesterday at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.
Simon Rockman, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news
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Intel throws open chip ovens to Altera - but who's next: Apple?

Intel has agreed to start manufacturing programmable chips for Altera in its first outside large-scale manufacturing deal, which could lead to contracts with firms like Apple.

US insurer punts 'bestiality' to wide-eyed kiddies, gasp 'mums'

Video US insurance outfit Geico has incurred the wrath of campaigning group One Million Moms for punting a "disgusting bestiality" agenda at wide-eyed kiddies.
Lester Haines, 26 Feb 2013
Samsung UHS-1 microSD card

Four firms pitch hi-def DRM for Flash cards

Panasonic, Samsung, Sony and Toshiba have begun licensing their new DRM technology for memory cards to anyone who feels the world needs yet another copy protection technology for HD content. They hope many content providers do indeed want a new DRM system, specifically one that secures content but doesn’t prevent content consumers from moving files from device to device, and even lending content to others.
Tony Smith, 26 Feb 2013

HP shareholders bay for blood in $19 BEELLION writedown aftermath

Updated Hewlett-Packard investors are rearing up against Meg Whitman’s board, demanding senior heads roll over several multi-billion-dollar failed acquisitions, including HP's 2011 $11bn buy of Brit software company Autonomy - which it wrote down to the tune of $8.8bn late last year.
Gavin Clarke, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news

Apple to cough up $100m after kids rinse parents' credit cards on apps

Parents whose credit cards took a hammering after their kids went on iTunes spending sprees are in line for some compensation from Apple - in a lawsuit settlement that could cost the fruity biz $100m.
Anna Leach, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news
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Black hat greed reducing software vulnerability report rate

RSA 2013 HP has kicked off the round of reports that accompany each RSA conference with its analysis of security vulnerabilities, and has revealed that although the overall trend is positive, the growing market for zero-day flaws is reducing the number of the most serious problems that are disclosed.
Iain Thomson, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news

Trekkies detect Spock's Vulcan homeworld ORBITING PLUTO

Trekkies have seized a poll in which the public voted on names for two of Pluto's moons - ensuring a winning moniker is Vulcan.
Sony Vaio Duo 11

Review: Sony Vaio Duo 11 Ultrabook

The other day, a friend sent me a Picasa link to photos he'd taken at a recent vintage motorcycle show. It was a wide ranging display of classic engineering imagination put to work to power a rider on two wheels. Similarly, it’s those variations on a theme that Windows 8 has spurred among mainstream computer makers, as they all have a stab at producing the quintessential convertible laptop. And much like the efforts of those early motorcycle pioneers, it seems that nobody’s quite sure how you make a laptop and a tablet work together. After all, if they knew, they’d all be doing it the same way, surely?
Bob Dormon, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news

Wi-Fi hotspots, phone masts: Prepare to be assimilated by O2's Borg

MWC 2013 Telefonica, owner of the O2 brand in the UK, has been showing off technology to integrate mobile phone networks with Wi-Fi.
Bill Ray, 26 Feb 2013
Engine Yard logo

Engine Yard plugs multiple IaaS players into back end

Platform-as-a-service Engine Yard has expanded its technical capabilities so developers can rapidly switch their apps between multiple infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) clouds.
Jack Clark, 26 Feb 2013

So a health boss, a GM veep and Qualcomm's big cheese walk into a bar

MWC 2013 The GSMA, which represents the world's mobile networks, tries to get people from outside the industry to give speeches at its annual Mobile World Congress shindig - preferably ones unlikely to upset anyone.
Simon Rockman, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news

That Firefox OS mobe: The sorta phone left behind after a mugging

MWC 2013 Mobile World Congress - the mobile networks' annual shindig - was getting unwieldy when 10,000 attendees and exhibitors hobbled between yachts in Cannes harbour, so it was moved to Barcelona.
Andrew Orlowski, 26 Feb 2013
Cloudera logo

Cloudera sends in the auditors – for Hadoop

Techies need tools to manage cranky Hadoop clusters, and business managers need to manage and report on access data stored in Hadoop to appease cranky auditors. And so, as part of an update to its CHD4 stack on Tuesday at the Strata conference in San Francisco, Cloudera is previewing a new data visualization and auditing tool that adds this much-needed feature to its big data muncher. The update also includes better data archiving and tweaked Hadoop cluster management tools.

Look out! PEAK WIND is COMING, warns top Harvard physicist

The realistic limits on wind power are probably much lower than scientists have suggested, according to new research, so much so that the ability of wind turbines to have any serious impact on energy policy may well be in doubt. Even if money were no object, the human race would hit Peak Wind output at a much lower level than has previously been thought.
Lewis Page, 26 Feb 2013
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Inside Intel's deal to let FPGA biz Altera use its 22nm TriGate fabs

Analysis A little over two years ago, upstart FPGA maker Achronix Semiconductor scored a big win over its rivals, Altera and Xilinx: it talked Intel into letting it use its cutting-edge chip factories to etch field-programmable gate array (FPGA) chips using Chipzilla's 22-nanometer TriGate process.
The Register breaking news

Google+ goes single sign-in, exec roasts Zuck's 'frictionless sharing'

Google+, which is the ad giant's "network thingy", can now be used to sign into third-party apps, the company confirmed today.
Kelly Fiveash, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news

Google Chrome feature helps you silence noisy tabs

Google has helped lower the blood pressure of internet users across the world with an experimental Chrome feature that makes it easy to identify which of your open tabs is blaring out noise.
Jack Clark, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news
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Symantec reports early Stuxnet variant first went live in 2005

RSA 2013 A new report from Symantec claims that Stuxnet is not a recent piece of malware, but was in action trying to cripple Iran's nuclear program way back in 2005.
Iain Thomson, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news

Microsoft finally ships Internet Explorer 10 for Windows 7

Following a protracted development process, Microsoft has at last shipped the release version of Internet Explorer 10 for Windows 7, with the new browser due to begin rolling out to customers via Windows Update within the next few weeks.
Neil McAllister, 26 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news
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Mobile data prices rise as capacity crunch bites – ACCC

The capacity crunch in Australia’s mobile airwaves has brought a response from carriers, with the ACCC reporting that real prices for mobile broadband services reversed their long-standing trend and rose in 2011-2012.
The defacement placed on 30_ sites by Johor Hacking Crew
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Malaysian hackers deface 30+ sites hosted by Melbourne company

A group of hackers identifying themselves as Johor Hacking Crew have defaced 30+ sites hosted by Melbourne company ServersInSeconds.com.au.
Simon Sharwood, 26 Feb 2013
Intel logo
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Intel takes on all Hadoop disties to rule big data munching

Look out Cloudera, MapR Technologies, EMC, Hortonworks, and IBM: Intel is the new elephant in the room. Intel has been dabbling for the past two years with its own distribution of the Hadoop stack, and starting in the second quarter it will begin selling services for its own variant of the Hadoop big data muncher.

Stop saying 'Cyber Pearl Harbor,' RSA boss pleads

RSA 2013 Art Coviello, executive president of RSA, used the opening keynote of the RSA conference to criticize the habits of some in the industry for spreading fear, uncertainty, and doubt (FUD) as a marketing tool.
Iain Thomson, 26 Feb 2013
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Attacker exposes ABC forum contributors

Updated In punishment for running a story about Dutch ultra-nationalist Geert Wilders, Australia’s national broadcaster, the ABC, has been attacked, and forum and moderator credentials published.