20th > January > 2007 Archive

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RIAA's legal win not so easy listening for XM

XM Satellite lost its bid to get a copyright infringement lawsuit dismissed, paving the way for the case challenging two radio receivers that allow listeners to make digital recordings of songs played on XM channels.
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Listen to the band?

Comment Ofcom's consultation on the Digital Dividend, aka selling off the analogue TV frequencies, has attracted more than its share of attention from El Reg readers who are in uproar about the proposed disconnection of the wirelessly connected.
Bill Ray, 20 2007
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Are women who are forty, fat and fair more likely to get gallstones?

Also in this week's column:
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Why is the human face hairless?

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Is the human skull made up of one bone or two?

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Identity

MPs investigate school fingerprinting

Opposition MPs have begun investigating the use of biometric scanners in UK schools and the use of funds that might otherwise be spent buying books and learning materials to buy the systems.
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Compuware aims to catch insiders

It is a sad, if well-known fact that the majority of security breaches in any business are the work of insiders. This is as true for IT security breaches as any other area, and finding out what has happened and who did it can be a tricky problem.
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Indies unite to challenge Big Four digital deals

MidemNet The world's biggest record label, albeit a "virtual" one, emerged today at the Midemnet conference in Cannes.
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Universal exec - say goodbye to the old record co.

MidemNet An RIAA board member and executive from the world's biggest record company has said the old way of doing business has gone forever now.
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Abortion or Broken Windows - How can the US be safer?

Analysis Fly to just about any Westernized country, and you're sure to see Freakonomics and The Tipping Point in the airport bookstore. The two volumes have quite a lot in common, including catchy titles, bestseller status and the allure of turning very plebeian readers into pseudo-intellectuals. Of particular note, however, is what the books fail to share - an explanation for why crime has fallen in New York.