2nd > January > 2007 Archive

A Brief History of Information

Part 1Part 1 Kierkegaard said that irony was "as baffling as depicting an elf wearing a hat that makes him invisible." He's lucky he never encountered information.
Ted Byfield, 02 Jan 2007
graph up

Security firm erects threat-level aggregator

Security intelligence firm CERTStation has established a threat level aggregation service. The CERTStation service pulls together real time risk assessments from eight vulnerability watch services (including Symantec ThreatCon, SANSInfoCon and CERTStation in-house service) on one Flash-tastic page.
John Leyden, 02 Jan 2007
1

Novatel Merlin XU870 ExpressCard 34 'super 3G' datacard

First UK ReviewFirst UK Review ExpressCard 34 add-ins are few and far between, leading a fair few notebook users to question the wisdom of laptop makers who've dropped the PC Card interconnect for the new, faster version. The mobile phone network Vodafone recently shipped a USB-connected HSDPA modem for PC Card-less. Perhaps it should have waited for Novatel's Merlin XU870, an ExpressCard 34 data card that does 'super 3G' up to 3.6Mbps...
Tony Smith, 02 Jan 2007

Vodafone offers buyers Samsung BlackBerry-a-like

Vodafone has begun offering Samsung's slimline BlackBerry-like i320 smart phone to its business customers, according to the carrier's website. It's charging from nothing to £140 inc. VAT for the QWERTY keypad-equipped handset, depending on which airtime package you select.
Register Hardware, 02 Jan 2007
channel

Germany and France split on Google-beater

Germany is withdrawing from an agreement with France to develop a Google-beating search engine. The Quaero programme was announced by Jacques Chirac in 2005 and promised a European search engine for PCs and mobile devices. The service was meant to provide better searching of audio and video content. Backed by the German and French governments along with Bertelsman, France Telecom and Deutsche Telekom it was meant to provide an antidote to Google, and US, hegemony.
John Oates, 02 Jan 2007

AMD behind ATI R600 spec, benchmark leak?

An alleged specification for AMD's soon-to-be-announced next-generation graphics chip, the ATI R600, has been posted on the web by a site that is said to have admitted it has links with the chip maker.
Tony Smith, 02 Jan 2007

The devil is in the details

Editors blogEditors blog It's well-known that data quality is often the devil you find hiding in the implementation detail of many big integration (and other) projects. It's a particular issue when companies merge. Of course, "your" salespeople always fill in contact and customer details accurately and honestly but "their" salespeople apparently got through the volumes by inventing contacts, selling to the entire population of Disneyworld - and if the spelling of a name looked a little odd they simply put up a new customer with a different spelling. Now, your merged database contains twice as many customers as it should, the stockmarket is taking an interest in the merged companies - and, hey, I wonder if there are compliance implications...
David Norfolk, 02 Jan 2007
For Sale sign detail

Wireless not worth hacking?

OpinionOpinion For four years, I've been pretty clear about my personal opinions on wireless hackers. I don't worry about them. So when I say: "It's time to worry about wireless hackers," it's not just another security consultant scare story being recycled - it's because I think things have changed.
Guy Kewney, 02 Jan 2007

Xbox 360 led US Xmas sales - just

They're figures for the US market and they're just preliminary findings, but it's looking like Nintendo's Wii and Sony's PlayStation 3 were both outsold by Microsoft's year-old Xbox 360 this Christmas - but only just.
Tony Smith, 02 Jan 2007

Fight for Hutchinson Essar mobile intensifies

What looked like a two-way battle between Vodafone and Reliance for Indian operator Hutchison Essar is shaping up as a triangular contest. Indian conglomerate Essar, which co-owns the operator with Hutchison, is looking to raise enough money to buy out its partner, and is emphasising its first-refusal position. Vodafone was expected to offer $13bn for Hutchinson’s share of the company, though figures as high as $18bn have been reported. The same reports are saying that Essar has suggested around $11bn, as an indication of what it thinks the company is worth. Neither Vodafone nor Essar has made a formal offer, nor is it clear how much Reliance might decide to put on the table. The possibilities are further complicated by the potential for Essar to instead sell its 33 per cent to either of the other bidders. Vodafone would be restricted to owning 74 per cent of the resulting company so would need another (local) partner if it bought up both parts. All this is looking very nice for Hutchinson, which saw its shares on the Hong Kong stock exchange rise 5 per cent on.
Bill Ray, 02 Jan 2007

eBayer offers OS X-booting Dell laptop

A UK-based eBayer last week offered for sale a Dell Inspiron 6000 notebook with a difference - this one booted into Apple's Mac OS X operating system, with Windows XP on board as an alternative.
Hard Reg, 02 Jan 2007
channel

How to crash a Windows mobile using MMS

Security researchers have released proof-of-concept code that exploits vulnerabilities in MMS implementations in mobile phones running mobile versions of Windows.
John Leyden, 02 Jan 2007

419 'money launderer' caught at Schiphol Airport

Dutch police believe a Nigerian man who was arrested at Schiphol Airport a couple of weeks ago with €1.2m in his pocket - the biggest money seizure in Dutch history - belongs to a major 419 scam operation. According to Dutch police Idowu Musiliu Balogun, 36, works for ringleader U. Kingsley, who is still at large. Kingsley and his band of confidence tricksters recently plundered a dozen or so German companies for €4m. Balogun and Kingsley were arrested two years ago in Nigeria for selling a house in the US without the knowledge of the owner. Both men had gained access to a mailbox of a US businessman and then instructed an estate agent to sell his house and transfer the money to their own account. Another victim from Limburg in the Netherlands was lured into a classic advance fee scheme, with promises of lottery winnings or an inheritance. Lawyer Theo Hiddema told the Dutch daily Telegraaf that his client "is just a Nigerian businessman who visited Holland to buy trucks, but unfortunately his business partner didn't turn up". However, Hiddema had to admit that if the accusations bear any merit “the case can get complicated."®
Jan Libbenga, 02 Jan 2007

Google steps in to the real world

A 2-month trial selling newspaper adverts to Google’s on-line customers has exceeded expectations according to the Washington Post, and will be expanded into a commercial service in the next few months, with radio and TV to follow. It’s no secret that Google makes its money selling advertising, or that the internet makes up just a part of any advertising budget, so the expansion of Google into print media shouldn’t come as any surprise. What has proved more contentious is the application of Google’s business model into the corporeal world, where large advertisers are used to a more cosy relationship with publishers than Google generally offers. Google customers are used to bidding on-line for placement, and the same model has been applied to newspaper adverts with some success; at least for the smaller advertisers. Advertisers pick a newspaper, and a section of the paper they want to appear in, then say how much they are willing to pay. The newspaper decides which bids, if any, they wish to accept. "We think it's a wonderful way to introduce advertisers to the New York Times and print overall," said Todd Haskell, vice president of business development at the paper, "we'd look to up-sell and migrate those [smaller advertisers] to bigger programs and better positions, and move them out of the Google system. And we've been very upfront with Google about that." Attempts by Google to do the same thing with magazine advertising went less well, though experiments with radio ads continue. Google customers may be unused to the lack of feedback, when compared to the click-rates available with on-line advertising, but measuring the success of advertising has always been a hit-and-miss affair and the simplicity of placing advertisements will appeal to many. Like many Google research projects this one isn’t making any money for the company, at least not yet. Negotiating commercial deals, for Google to take a commission on each advert, is the next stage, and it remains to be seen if a successful trail can be turned into a successful product. Google has proved itself willing to take a very small percentage on a large number of placements in other media, which could well be attractive to newspapers with space to fill, so there’s little reason to doubt the ultimate success of a corporeal Google.
Bill Ray, 02 Jan 2007
chart

Why the Novell and Microsoft deal is good for Linux

Industry commentIndustry comment Being ever aware of Microsoft's monopolisation endeavours, coupled with working in a Linux world inherently mistrustful of the software giant, it may seem strange that I believe the Microsoft/Novell agreement will be great for Linux. But I do.
Peter Dawes-Huish, 02 Jan 2007

Katie Price and Peter Andre: the greatest album ever?

It's official: the debut album by highly-talented popsters Katie Price and Peter Andre has been classified by Amazon reviewers as possibly the greatest album ever - a terrible shock to those of us ready to dismiss their musical talents and consign A Whole New World to the dustbin of musical history. One breathless correspondent classifies the masterwork as "simply genius", while another is moved to admit that the songs are "so emotional, they make me go weak at the sphincter". The following is typical of the orgy of adulation currently romping uncontrolled in the album's review section: There is one incredible moment on this album and that is the nanosecond of silence just before the first track commences. In that moment the whole universe shivers for a second. the title is literal - even eponymous. This album is not just genre defining, it represents the ending of an epoch and the opening of a whole new world. I can only agree with other reviewers about the overwhelming emotional response I had when I knew this album had been made (well...brought to life, really, since it was something that was predestined to "BE" - like a dormant succubus aroused by cavorting nude witches). I literally retched i was so overcome. I was lightheaded with exaltation. In fact I was so delirious I crossed the road with this on my ipod and was run over by a car. Amazingly I did not feel a thing. I have only one complaint about this meisterwerk. The Price. It's far too low. Were there to be but one copy remaining in the world, and had my own copy been mysteriously burned in a catastrophic fire in which I had been unable to risk my life rescuing it, I would gladly sell my children into slavery to buy that last remaining disc. Thank you Peter. Thank you Katie. I am looking at the world right now and as of now it really is completely new to me. I understand none of it. I am like a new born babe. My mind is a tabula rasa and you have written new instructions upon that page. I will now carry out your instructions to the letter... Excellent. If you'll excuse us, we're just off to HMV...®
Lester Haines, 02 Jan 2007

O2 late to start year

It seems an obvious enough ploy: all O2 customers were sent an SMS message suggesting they might want to avoid the congestion which normally clogs up the mobile networks come midnight: 02: Happy New Year! So we're a bit early, but why not join us? Send your New Year texts early and beat the midnight rush ...which would have been more effective if the message itself hadn’t been caught up in that same congestion; in some cases not arriving until mid-day on the 1st January. Far be it for us to buck a trend: so Happy New Year for the remaining 362 days of 2007.
Bill Ray, 02 Jan 2007

Kansas temperatures hit all-time low

Thanks very much to reader Jon Fisher who sent us the following screengrab relating to the weather in his home town of Manhattan, Kansas. Locals should be certain to wrap up warm before venturing from the house: Chillingly, this forecast by AccuWeather.com classifies -5572°C as "Moderate" on its Cold Index, leading us to suspect that a really cold snap may be imminent. Considers yourselves warned. ®
Lester Haines, 02 Jan 2007

Singles charts goes digital

The UK Top 40 singles chart has severed its historical dependency on physical stuff. As of yesterday, the hit parade will allow digital-only tracks to be included in the weekly listing. The Official UK Charts Company, which runs the marketing survey, has dropped its requirement that labels must produce the song in some physical form. The OCC began to include digital downloads in 2004, and in March last year a song by Gnarls Barkly's Crazy reached Number One purely via net distribution - a week ahead of its physical launch. The change has helped double the volume of singles sales. In 2004 32.3m singles were sold in the UK, which rose to 65.1m last year (not counting the final week). Physical sales dwindled from 26.5m in 2004 to 13.6m last year. The growth has come from the "tail" - the number one typically shifts as many copies as before - between 30,000 and 50,000 - and that's well down from the single's heydey in the Smashie and Nicie era. Rules have also been relaxed on qualifying EPs, which are now permitted to carry four tracks and run longer. The British Phonographic Industry (BPI) jointly runs the OCC. Perhaps that's why the OCC doesn't attempt to count P2P transfers - which dwarf "legal" sales by a factor of 10 to 1. ®
Andrew Orlowski, 02 Jan 2007

Scientists look to straighten homosexual sheep

Former Wimbledon champion Martina Navratilova has come out in favour of the rights of homosexual sheep in a burgeoning row over tests carried out by two US universities aimed at "curing" ovine friends of Dorothy. According to The Times, researchers at Oregon State University in the city of Corvallis and at the Oregon Health and Science University in Portland were able to "pinpoint the mechanisms influencing the desires of 'male-oriented' rams by studying their brains". Specifically, they cut open the offending sheeps' skulls, attached electonic sensors to their grey matter and monitored them while "varying the hormone levels, mainly by injecting hormones into the brain". They reported "considerable success" in getting previously gay rams to consider a bit of boy-on-girl. The purpose behind these experiments is to "improve the productivity of herds" since "approximately one ram in 10 prefers to mount other rams rather than mate with ewes". The implications are far more sinister, opponents claim, since the acquired knowledge could in the future be used to "cure" human homosexuality, or may offer the prospect that "pregnant women could one day be offered a [hormone] treatment to reduce or eliminate the chance that their offspring will be homosexual". Ms Navratilova weighed in with: "How can it be that in the year 2006 a major university would host such homophobic and cruel experiments?" UK gay rights campaigner Peter Tatchell declared: "These experiments echo Nazi research in the early 1940s which aimed at eradicating homosexuality. They stink of eugenics. There is a danger that extreme homophobic regimes may try to use these experimental results to change the orientation of gay people." Udo Schuklenk, Professor of Bioethics at Glasgow Caledonian University, who has "written to the researchers pressing them to stop", added: "I don't believe the motives of the study are homophobic, but their work brings the terrible possibility of exploitation by homophobic societies. Imagine this technology in the hands of Iran, for example. It is typical of the US to ignore the global context in which this is taking place." Professor Charles Roselli, the Health and Science University biologist heading the research programme, defended his work with: "In general, sexuality has been under-studied because of political concerns. People don't want science looking into what determines sexuality." Michael Bailey, a neurology professor at Northwestern University near Chicago, risked the wrath of the gay community by stating: "Allowing parents to select their children’s sexual orientation would further a parent's freedom to raise the sort of children they want to raise." As for the unfortunate gay rams subjected to the research teams' uninvited attentions, it remained for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals to slam their sufferings as "a needless slaughter of animals, an affront to human dignity and a colossal waste of precious research funds". ®
Lester Haines, 02 Jan 2007
channel

Google plugs GMail exploit

Google has fixed a vulnerability in its popular GMail web mail service that creates a means for hackers to steal users' contact lists.
John Leyden, 02 Jan 2007

Data modelling wars

CommentComment It is actually going a bit far to say that there are truly data modelling wars going on but certainly the users of ERWin are being aggressively targeted by both Sybase with PowerDesigner and Embarcadero with ER/Studio. This is, in part, because ERWin no longer sits within any of CA's core areas of focus, so it hardly surprising that it is losing mind share and customers.
Philip Howard, 02 Jan 2007

BBC peddles news filth to children

According to the BBC's Predictions for 2007, Afghanistan is set to become the new Northern Ireland. If that's true, then the photo accompanying this piece of crystal ball gazing should alert the locals as to the need to lock up their grandmothers: Shocking. The parents among you still not convinced - following the recent "Mingegate" outrage - that your kiddies are being exposed to mindless internet filth which will one day drag them down into degeneracy and despair, should note that it was the 12-year-old son a regular reader who noticed the above. We have, as ever, made our dossier available to the relevant authorities - in this case the MOD and The News of the World. ®
Lester Haines, 02 Jan 2007

Tokyo to blanket Ginza with RFID tags

The Tokyo Ubiquitous Network Project has announced plans to blanket the Ginza region of Tokyo, the most popular shopping district, with 10,000 RFID tags and other wireless technologies to provide shopper-assistance and location-based services. The trial starts later this month, and will feature a specially-designed handheld equipped with RFID, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity. This handheld can rented by visitors, though the vision is that the service should be available on compatible phone handsets. The thousands of RFID tags are used to identify where the user is; each has a unique serial number which is sent to a central server that responds with local information and directions if required. The device will also automatically display special offers in nearby shops, and give information about the various retailers in each of the many buildings in the area. The Tokyo Ubiquitous Network Project is a joint venture between the Japanese government and various high-tech companies including Fujitsu, Hitachi and NEC, and has run smaller trials elsewhere as well as developing technologies and usage models. These trials will run until March. In these days of GPS, Galileo and triangulation systems it might seem a retrograde step to simply place numbered tags around an area, but the technology has the advantage of being accurate and reliable, as well as being ideally suited for a pedestrian population, and the visitors who are so frequently lost around Ginza.
Bill Ray, 02 Jan 2007

Growing rumpus over Saddam execution footage

The Iraqi authorities have launched an enquiry into "unofficial mobile phone footage" of Saddam Hussein's execution last Saturday after the graphic video surfaced on the internet within hours of his hanging, the BBC reports. The grainy two-and-a-half minute film shows Hussein being taunted by witnesses, with one unknown onlooker shouting "go to hell" while others chant the name of "Shia cleric Moqtada Sadr and of Muhammad Sadiq Sadr, his father who was murdered by Saddam Hussein's agents". In reply, Hussein enquires of his tormentors: "Do you consider this bravery?" An advisor to Iraqi prime minister Nouri Maliki, Sami al-Askari, told Reuters: "There were a few guards who shouted slogans that were inappropriate and that's now the subject of a government investigation." UK deputy prime minister John Prescott, temporarily at the helm while Tony Blair is on holiday, told the BBC today: "I think the manner was quite deplorable really. I don't think one can endorse in any way that, whatever your views about capital punishment. "Frankly, to get the kind of recorded messages coming out is totally unacceptable, and I think whoever was involved and responsible for it should be ashamed of themselves." ®
Lester Haines, 02 Jan 2007

BOFH 2006: Complete and utter detox

17 minutes of goodwill Episode 1 Happy New Year The Way of the Hammer Episode 2 Engineers are great! 'Did you know..?' Episode 3 Yes, we did - we're Systems and Networks Automated attendant abuse Episode 4 'I'm sorry, that serial number is not recognised' Headhunted Episode 5 'A wonderful opportunity' BOFH takes a leaf from Captain Kirk's log Episode 6 New recruit lost on unexplored planet Birthday present backfire Episode 7 Snap...happy? Being root Episode 8 Seminar sabotage A change in tone Episode 9 Insert this, way up Feral access points Episode 10 Wild, untamed... Clear and present danger Episode 11 When loop pile carpet attacks Dumping old crap Episode 12 Your room, your responsibility! Headcase Episode 13 A law unto himself Dear Valuable VIP Customer Episode 14 Licence renewal Interview with a CEO Episode 15 Witnesses, what witnesses? That security thang Episode 16 A journey, not a destination Power down blues Episode 17 Averse altruism Blast from the past Episode 18 Old flame ignites trouble Union 'negotiations' Episode 19 'It's not about the money' Dr Bastard's lab challenge Episode 20 Mickey Mouse inventions Double whammy Episode 21 No time to argue Champion of culture Episode 22 Get rid of what to cut costs? Go on then, subcontract us... Episode 23 But pay the price Lawsuit ahoy! Episode 24 You can't sue us! Office politics Episode 25 A disturbance in the force Bastard gets fired Episode 26 An undocumented bonus The Bastard and the Mouse Episode 27 BOFH's guide to procurement The computer whisperer Episode 28 Hex-eptional sense Out on the lash Episode 29 Smooth operators Retirement plan Episode 30 It's as easy as ones and zeros Unconventional interview Episode 31 How many pints did you say you can drink? Pulling a computer survey swifty Episode 32 Five grand for your silence The mystery of the impenetrable data safe Episode 33 Impenetrable? Yeah right Let the games begin Episode 34 'Building the perfect games beast on the company dime' Armageddon Episode 35 MoD pays a visit in computer bunker hunt Goes virtual Episode 36 Why not to put all your blades in one basket Data wiping hell Episode 37 Operation computer clean up Dessert storm Episode 38 Guerrilla warfare When non-IT people make IT decisions Episode 39 Brace for impact IT services review Episode 40 'Lending a hand' to the CEO The Bastard and the IT training budget Episode 41 Viral marketing The most important user in the world... Episode 42 Is that a rocking horse in your bedroom? Looting Christmas treasure Episode 43 Foiled The Bastard's guide to airport security Episode 44 PFY plays guinea pig Previously... BOFH 2005: All you can eat 36 courses of meaty goodness BOFH 2004: The whole shooting match That fun-filled year in full BOFH 2003: Year Book Fun for all the family BOFH 2002: A Reader's Digest Travelling Companion 2001: A BOFH Odyssey BOFH Yearbook BOFH 2K: The kit and caboodle That was the year that was... in full The Compleat BOFH Archives 95-99 And there's more...
Team Register, 02 Jan 2007
For Sale sign detail

Munich buys Windows 2000 used licenses

The German city of Munich is buying a whole pile of Microsoft Windows this month - but it won't be the newly released Windows Vista. Instead, it will buy 2000 legit "used licenses" of Windows 2000 Professional, claiming it will save them money.
Jan Libbenga, 02 Jan 2007

Saddam's YouTube smash

OpinionOpinion WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT "User Generated Content" finally scored a smash hit in 2006, although we had to wait until the year's end to see it. But thanks to a minute of grainy, camera phone footage, the truly shambolic nature of the execution of former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein was disclosed for all to see. The footage that the networks wouldn't show is the weekend's hit on YouTube. From creation to distribution, this is a landmark event for people-powered media. So why aren't the usual technology evangelists - who see every natural disaster is an opportunity - trumpeting it this time? These ambulance chasers rarely miss the chance to trumpet the power of networked technology: the Madrid and London terror bombings, and the Asian Tsunami, were all touted as heralding a new media epoch - with buzzwords such as "gatekeepers" and "democratization" thrown around with abandon. New media pundits belong to a cult of disclosure - the more information we have available to us, the wiser we will all be. If we could only publish everything, and make it instantly accessible to everyone, we'll have reached a higher state of consciousness. For example, this belief is beautifully illustrated by the claim that "Widely Available, Constantly Renewing, High Resolution Images of the Earth Will End Conflict and Ecological Devastation As We Know It" - that one (if you hadn't already guessed) comes from a Google marketing guy. YouTube star Saddam In which case, you'd think the Saddam's YouTube sensation would fit the bill perfectly. The footage records a preternaturally calm dictator facing a braying mob of hooded executioners - proof enough that in Iraqi, a police or army uniform is daywear for sectarian militias. Nothing quite brings home the chaos of law and order like this grisly spectacle. So hasn't YouTube done the world a favour? Perhaps the guarded reaction should to be welcomed with some relief. The haunting footage is less grisly than much of YouTube, which already hosts a spectrum of personal violence ranging from school beatings to roadside bombs. What may, we hope, be giving the technology evangelists cause for circumspection is that sometimes this kind of full disclosure doesn't really help us at all. Whether you think the dictator should have been hung, or merely left to rot in misery, you probably didn't want to see him outclassing his executioners. Thanks to a cameraphone and YouTube, we heard his brilliant one-line riposte to a taunt, and thanks to YouTube we saw his final prayer interrupted. And thanks to YouTube, we're part of the spectacle, as Stephen Moss writes today: "Saddam's killers have achieved the impossible: they have made us feel sympathy for him, for his grace under pressure. There may not have been dignity in the dying, but there was courage. A five-star death. For someone who terrorized civic society for thirty years and launched a war that cost a million lives, it doesn't quite seem fair. Thanks, Web 2.0 - but there is such a thing as "too much information". ® Normal service has been resumed
Andrew Orlowski, 02 Jan 2007

eBay cross verification bug

For an e-tailer, there isn’t a worse time of year to have major issues with your site than the run-up to Christmas, but that is precisely what eBay has been struggling with at the moment. eBay calls it a "cross verification bug", essentially it is the link between a user's eBay and their Paypal account. While it may sound innocuous, it's actually quite devastating. Paypal checkout and even creating creating new auctions are both affected. Paying for an auction, having one of your own auctions paid for, and even creating new auctions are all not possible. So, er, thats pretty much 99 per cent of what you would want to do on eBay huh? Part of the problem from a sellers perspective is that your buyer gets a right dodgey error message when trying to pay: This seller cannot currently receive payments If you Google this error, all the results say that the seller probably has a frozen account. The bug/error also keeps you from creating new auctions. Every time you try to create one, you get a page asking you to verify your Paypal account (regardless if you have already done so … many times). [Click image for full-size version] Thankfully both eBay and Paypal are aware of the issue: From Paypal: We are aware of the intermittent error 3005 in the eBay checkout flow. We are currently working to get this resolved. Please send the payment using the PayPal checkout flow. From eBay: eBay Technical Support Have you tried this little work around yet? 1. Log In to your PayPal account. 2. Go to your profile and add and confirm your bank account. 3. Once you have completed the process, please update your PayPal account by selecting “My Account”, then “Profile”, then “Selling Preferences” and choose “Auctions”. 4. Click on “Add” and enter your eBay User ID. djhomeless ?? eBay Technical Support This is a fix eBay Technical Support For your issue djhomeless My Paypal account has had my ebay details for a while djhomeless Do I have to resubmit them>? eBay Technical Support Yea eBay Technical Support and if that doesn’t work eBay Technical Support Call this number 1-402-935-2050. eBay Technical Support At this time you might want to call them and say you’re having an eBay cross verification problem djhomeless Any reason why my account has been flagged? eBay Technical Support Its not been flagged its a site wide bug The Name of the eBay Rep removed/renamed. Please note, the number listed above is not for eBay, it's for Paypal US. The eBay phone number seems to be as closely guarded a secret as the recipe for Coke. Update After further correspondence from eBay, it appears the issue with being unable to create new auctions was actually a seperate bug, related to eBay’s new safe harbour enhancements. Geoffrey McCaleb writes content management systems for a living. His blog lives here.
Geoffrey McCaleb, 02 Jan 2007
graph up

Happy New Malware

A significant worm outbreak over the new year festivities has put paid to the notion we've seen the end of mass mailing worms just yet.
John Leyden, 02 Jan 2007

Microsoft accused of trying to buy bloggers

A Microsoft stunt handing out brand spanking new laptops with Windows Vista to selected bloggers has backfired with claims that Microsoft tried to "buy" bloggers. At least six bloggers each received a sleek, black, highly specified Ferrari machine running the as-yet-to-be released Windows Vista from Microsoft and Acer just before Christmas. At least one recipient claimed his machine was a gift. Microsoft watcher Long Zheng called the PC a "Christmas present [that was] officially" a review machine. He congratulated Microsoft on its "kudos for thinking about the little guys" - meaning that it is targeting bloggers instead of the usual PC trade publications that make it on the big vendors' gift list. That was enough for the Blogosphere, which sniffed a crude attempt at bribery and began a debate on the ethics of accepting free gifts from IT companies. Veteran blogger, and former Microsoft employee Robert Scoble summed it up: "Now THAT is my idea of PayPerPost" - the idea of paying bloggers to post, only using cash instead of gifts. And our favourite tech comment site Slashdot has a barrage of criticism here. Subsequent postings by Zheng intended to defuse the situation only reinforced the perception the Windows Vista machines are gifts intended to curry favor. "These were review PCs with the option at completion of review to either send back to Microsoft, give away or keep indefinitely. This choice is solely at the discretion of bloggers," he wrote. Typically, the release of PCs and other gadgets by PR people to journalists working in what bloggers tend to deride as the "traditional media" are tightly controlled, and machines are expected to be returned once review is complete. Stung by the criticism, Microsoft issued a statement that put the onus on bloggers to make full disclosure. Microsoft's statement, though, does little to clarify its real motive, as it weaved between notions of "review" and "free gift". Microsoft's Aaron Coldiron said the computers are intended for review purposes. In its note to the lucky bloggers , Microsoft said: "While I hope you will blog about your experience with the PC you don't have to. Also, you are welcome to send the machine back to us after you are done playing with it, or you can give it away on your site, or you can keep it."®
Gavin Clarke, 02 Jan 2007
graph up

Second Nasdaq warning for BEA

Java middleware vendor BEA Systems has received a second warning from Nasdaq over potential delisting of its stock for failing to file financial results.
Gavin Clarke, 02 Jan 2007