1st June 2006 Archive

Cat 5 cable

IBM's Silicon Valley research mecca turns 20

IBM's famed Almaden Research Center today celebrated twenty years of blood, sweat, research and development.
The Register breaking news

Compensating for SOA errors

John Schlesinger is director of integration Solutions for iWay Software (part of Information Builders Inc) and has a long history in our business.
The Register breaking news

Changing BT makes 'good start'

BT has made "a good start" meeting new regulatory obligations to provide the UK telecoms industry with equal access to its network.

Apple nears XServe, Mac Pro Intel switch

Apple will use Intel's upcoming 'Woodcrest' server processor - due to ship as the Xeon 5100 series - in the x86-based version of its XServe rackmount server, an online report has claimed. The upshot: the Power Mac G5 will become the last Mac to get the Intel treatment, shipping with a Core 2 Duo chip inside a month after the new XServe debuts.

Nominet warns on Whois data mining

Nominet has issued a warning about commercial companies that are swiping copyrighted information on domain name owners from its Whois database.
The Register breaking news

Tesco IT boss makes £2.2m

Tesco's IT director 44 year old Philip Clarke is paid £2.2m for his work at the supermarket. Clarke has been on the board of directors since 1998.
The Register breaking news

Bird rescuers find alien in duck

Forget Area 51: welcome to Area H5N1 - otherwise known as the International Bird Rescue Research Center (IBRRC) in Fairfield, California - and location of the first confirmed sighting of an alien secreted within the body of a duck:
homeless man with sign

Spam deluge eclipses email virus threat

May witnessed an all-time low for virus-laden emails and a record high for spam, according to stats from email filtering firm BlackSpider Technologies. Emails containing malware made up just 0.73 percent of all emails scanned by BlackSpider last month while junk emails represented 87.74 per cent. By comparison, the number of virus-infected emails reached 3.93 per cent of all emails in December 2005, a record high. The drop since then is reckoned to be down to a shift of tactics by malware authors, who are beginning to favour targeted attacks.

Analyst touts AMD-ATI tie-up

AMD wants to buy ATI, a financial analyst has suggested, though he provides no direct evidence that such a move will take place or when it may happen.
The Register breaking news

BBC survey damns NHS IT system

Connecting for Health (CfH) has defended the NHS National Programme for IT (NPfIT) against the negative results of a new survey.
Kablenet, 01 2006

Intel to lay off 16,000 workers?

Is Intel about to rid itself of 16,000 workers - just over 16 per cent of its global workforce - later this month? So suggest whispers doing the rounds among Silicon Valley's technology community at the moment.
The Register breaking news

UK bloggers also likely to be Apple-proof

California's Court of Appeal ruled last week that staff at web magazines qualified for journalistic protection. While there has never been a test case in the UK, a Solicitor Advocate says bloggers are likely to enjoy similarly strong protections here.
The Register breaking news

Telia boss charged with not attending Abba musical

The chief exec of pan-Scandy telco TeliaSonera has been charged with bribery, along with the company's Swedish boss, over a planned, but aborted, trip to Abba musical Mamma Mia.

Asus readies Core 2 Duo, Core 2 Extreme mobo

Intel has yet to ship either its Core 2 Duo or its Core 2 Extreme processors, but that hasn't stopped Asus from announcing a motherboard that will support both of the upcoming CPUs.

First StarOffice malware sighted

Virus writers have created the first virus to affect StarOffice. Stardust uses macros to attack Sun's alternative office suite. The malware was written as a proof-of-concept code to show what might be possible rather than as a serious attempt to create a new attack vector.
The Register breaking news

The time has come to ditch email

Comment Back in 1972, by some accounts, a new form of communication known as email was born. It was a practical implementation of electronic messaging that was first seen on local timeshare computers in the 1960s. I can only imagine how much fun and revolutionary it must have been to use email in those early years, to have been at the bleeding edge of the curve.

3G BlackBerry 8707 debuts

Research in Motion's 3G-enabled BlackBerry finally made its debut this week, initially in Germany on the Vodafone network.
The Register breaking news

DoJ pushes data retention on ISPs

Anticipating a court defeat for the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) bid which would extend the Communications Assistance to Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) to make Internet service providers wiretap friendly, US Attorney General Alberto Gonzales and FBI Director Robert Mueller have launched a PR campaign pitching Internet data retention as the next best solution to kiddie porn and terrorism.

Samsung readies TV, 3G phones for Europe

Samsung will this month ship Europe's first digital TV phone capable of receiving programmes broadcast on a terrestrial Digital Multimedia Broadcasting (DMB) network, the company said yesterday. It also pledged to ship its latest 3G phone in Europe soon.
The Register breaking news

LiveJournal tells lactating mums to put 'em away

LiveJournal has allegedly put a stop to breastfeeding mothers proudly displaying milk-packed jubs in their default userpics after the voluntary Abuse Team deemed such images "inappropriate".

Motorola parades D&G-styled gold RAZR

Motorola today began shipping a gold-coloured version of its RAZR V3i clamshell handset. The gaudy article is co-branded by Italian fashion house Dolce & Gabbana. The sound you can hear in the background is a million chavs clamouring for the gilt-like device.
The Register breaking news

Be Unlimited 24Meg broadband review

Tech Digest Veteran TechDigest readers may recall this news item about Be’s Unlimited 24mbps broadband – then as now the fastest available in the UK -  back in August of last year.
The Register breaking news

Police offered robot eye

A firm that produces surveillance software used by numerous British police forces is looking for one of them to test its latest wheez, a programme that automatically scans CCTV footage for suspicious behaviour and matches it with other intelligence such as mugshots.

Microsoft-led coalition bands against Apple iPod

It's almost like MSX all over again. Microsoft, Toshiba, JVC, NTT DoCoMo, Creative, iRiver and three other firms have banded together in a bid to prevent Apple's iPod from completely dominating the Japanese portable music player market.

Swiss firm touts medical USB key

Here at last is a good reason to keep a USB Flash drive around your neck at all times: it's got your medical history stored on it. That's the idea Swiss company Medistick is touting. It launched its first product today.

Griffin TuneBuds iPod lanyard-earphone combo

Review Apple's lightweight iPod Nano would be ideal for dangling around your neck had Apple bothered to bundle a lanyard with the player as it did with the screen-less iPod Shuffle. It will sell you one, of course, neatly fitted to a pair of standard white iPod earphones, but that's not much use if you want something in black, or you fancy a set of in-the-ear 'phones...

Cingular to offer 'world's smallest' flip phone

Pantech has announced what it claims is the world's smallest clamshell GSM phone is now on sale in the US, courtesy of North American carrier Cingular.

O2 brings BlackBerry 7130 to Blighty

Mobile operator O2 today marked the first appearance of Research in Motion's smart-phone styled BlackBerry 7130 series - the follow on to the 7100 series - in the UK.

EC backs UK tax man on VAT fraud

The European Commission has strengthened HMRC’s hand against VAT fraudsters by backing a “reverse charge mechanism” for VAT payments.
Joe Fay, 01 2006
The Register breaking news

Swedish court says PCs used for gambling need permit

An internet café in Örebro in Sweden has been closed after the local council argued that its twelve PCs were occasionally used for gambling and it therefore needed a gaming permit.
The Register breaking news

BBC to broadcast World Cup online

The BBC will broadcast all its World Cup games live on broadband, it has announced.

AMD pegs mid-2007 for complete chip overhaul

AMD today dangled a couple of key dates in front of customers, hoping to keep them sweet in the coming years instead of defecting back to Intel.

HP grabs 90 per cent of 'industry standard' Itanic market

Any claims by Intel that the Itanium processor is an "industry standard" will look more than foolish now that HP has captured an astonishing 90 per cent of the Itanium server market.

Ernst & Young laptop loss exposes 243,000 Hotels.com customers

Exclusive Ernst & Young's laptop loss unit continues to be one of the company's more productive divisions. We learn this week that the accounting firm lost a system containing data on 243,000 Hotels.com customers. Hotels.com joins the likes of Sun Microsystems, IBM, Cisco, BP and Nokia, which have all had their employees' data exposed by Ernst & Young, as revealed here in a series of exclusive stories.