30th > January > 2006 Archive

The Register breaking news

Apache 2.2: new goodies from an old friend

Of course, you know this anyway. But just for the benefit of any long-term residents of Planet Amnesia, Apache is the software that powers most servers on the web - including, naturally, El Reg. And in December, Apache marked its tenth birthday with its first major new release in a little over three and a half years.
Nick Kew, 30 2006
graph up

Good worms back on the agenda

ARLINGTON, Virginia - A researcher has reopened the subject of beneficial worms, arguing that the capabilities of self-spreading code could perform better penetration testing inside networks, turning vulnerable systems into distributed scanners.
The Register breaking news

Vodafone besieged by short termists

Just as the US mobile carriers are turning in storming performances, Vodafone is under unprecedented pressure to dump its 45 per cent stake in Verizon Wireless. Arun Sarin, defending his own CEOship in the face of mounting shareholder criticism, claims this would be the wrong time to get out of Verizon, since there would be greater shareholder value to be derived from waiting – perhaps a very long time. But two of the operator’s top six shareholders have gone public with criticisms of the current strategy and a call to explore an exit from Verizon Wireless, a move that could generate £25-30bn.

Dell: no Intel exclusive

It's official: Dell doesn't have an exclusive deal with Intel, and has an open mind on using AMD processors in its products.

Netgear's newest MIMO Wi-Fi gets full test

The test is a disaster for the IEEE and 802.11n. The good news is that the new Wi-Fi MIMO technology really does reach throughput speeds of 100Mbps. The bad news: it utterly crushed a neighbouring network that used standard 802.11g.

Services market back to growth

The IT, software and services market is heading back to growth - but growth tempered by a strong focus on cost-cutting.
For Sale sign detail

Smartfundit.com launches software financing market

Comment Traditionally organisations have "bought" the software they use, although the range of licensing options available can be enough to confuse anyone. However, on both sides of the IT world (vendor and customer), surprisingly little attention has been given to acquiring the right to use software on a "subscription" basis rather than on perpetual use licenses. But this may be about to change.
Tony Lock, 30 2006

Third of employers feel pressured to offshore

Almost a third of UK organisations feel under pressure to take some of their business offshore to cut costs and tackle skill shortages, according to a new survey from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD).

Irish Greens in stew over GM spud

Ireland's Environment Protection Agency (EPA) is considering a request from German chemicals giant BASF to conduct field trials of a genetically-modified, blight-resistant potato, Reuters reports.
The Register breaking news

'RFID tag' - the rude words ID card ministers won't say

When it comes to RFID, is MP Andy Burnham lying or drowning? If it's lying, then in principle the Home Office Minister is no more lying than other people are - the US Department of Homeland Security, the EU's Justice & Home Affairs Committee and impressive numbers of RFID, sorry, contactless, proximity chip vendors. But if he's not, the drowning act is pretty convincing.
The Register breaking news

Spain arrests six in net pervert crackdown

Six people have been arrested in Spain in a crackdown targeting the exchange of images of child abuse that has also led to the closure of 62 so-called "internet communities".
The Register breaking news

Mars takes centre stage in IMAX spectacular

Last Friday saw the premiere of Roving Mars, an IMAX spectacular created from material recorded by NASA's Spirit and Opportunity rovers on the Red Planet. The rovers' principal scientific investigator Steven Squyres, who also narrates some of the film, told Reuters: "I've kind of had this picture of what Mars really looks like in my head for all this time, and for the first time on that IMAX screen, what I saw with my eyes matched my impressions of what it should really look like."

Relisys goes into administration

Monitor maker Relisys has gone into administration.
New Intel logos

Intel Core Duo hit by USB battery drain bug

Intel may be off the hook as the source of a bug observed by reviews that significantly reduces the battery life of Core Duo-based notebooks - apparently it's all Microsoft's fault. Or is it?

VIP buys Realtime Distribution

UK distie VIP is buying Huntingdon-based Realtime Distribution - best-known for supplying gaming components.
The Register breaking news

Face and fingerprints swiped in Dutch biometric passport crack

Dutch TV programme Nieuwslicht (Newslight) is claiming that the security of the Dutch biometric passport has already been cracked. As the programme reports here, the passport was read remotely and then the security cracked using flaws built into the system, whereupon all of the biometric data could be read.
The Register breaking news

Net gene tests dismissed as 'snakeoil'

Scientists have warned punters to avoid DIY gene tests currently enjoying a bit of a boom on the internet, because there is no evidence they work, The Guardian reports.
fingers pointing at man

Elcom goes the way of all resellers

In the 80s it was 'he who dares, wins'. In the 90s it was 'get big, get niche or get out'. At the turn of the millennium it was going to be 'services, services, services.'
hands waving dollar bills in the air

MS source code fence jailed for two years

A Connecticut man was jailed for two years on Friday (27 January) after pleading guilty to offering stolen copies of Windows' source code for sale online. William Genovese, 29, of Meriden, Connecticut, pleading guilty in August 2005 to trade secret offences over his attempts to sell purloined copies of the software blueprints for Windows 2000 and Windows NT 4.
Sony Walkman NW-A1000

Sony admits Connect Player 1.0 music software 'problems'

Sony has apologised for problems some users have experienced with its Connect Player utility when the jukebox software is used with the firm's NW-A1000, NW-A3000 and NW-A608 digital music players, launched last November.

Macally readies iPod Nano dockable headphones

Don't want to carry your iPod Nano in a pocket or around your neck? Then how about carrying it on your head? Accessory maker MacAlly has announced a set of cordless headphones that incorporate their own iPod Nano dock.
The Register breaking news

T-Mobile USA makes unprecedented network expansion

The gap between T-Mobile USA and the other national carriers, Cingular, Verizon Wireless and Sprint Nextel, has widened following the past year’s wave of mergers in the US mobile market.
T-Mobile US' MDA and SDA smart phones

Time Warner embraces P2P

Time Warner (TW) is embracing peer-to-peer technology to distribute films and other media in Germany. Despite leading the digital rights charge against Napster, the firm can now see the benefits of the technology.
Fujifilm S9500 digital camera

Fujifilm FinePix S9500 Zoom nine-megapixel camera

Review Fujifilm's FinePix S9500 Zoom is a nine megapixel all-in-one 'bridge' camera with a long 10.7x optical zoom lens and SLR-like styling. With its design and features, Fujifilm is clearly targeting buyers of budget digital SLRs, quoting LCD-based composition, a tilting monitor, movie mode and no concerns over dust getting on the sensor as key advantages. It's also comfortably cheaper than most budget digital SLRs...

RIM defeats intellectual property firm

Research in Motion (RIM) has prevailed in a patent infringement legal battle in Germany, the company said today. Like its better-known fight with US intellectual property holding company NTP, RIM's tussle with Luxembourg-based InPro centres on allegations that it used, without permission, technology patented by InPro.
The Register breaking news

iSoft shares take a tumble

Health provider iSoft saw its shares plummet this afternoon on news that profits will be hit by delays to Government improvements to NHS IT.

MS to omit anti-virus from Vista

Microsoft will omit anti-virus protection in Vista, the next version of Windows, which it plans to ship late this year. As with previous versions of Windows dating back to Windows 2000 at least, Redmond is promoting Vista as a landmark improvement in Windows security.
The Register breaking news

Tree-hugging telco makes carbon neutral bid

Manchester telco Your Communications has laudably decided to become a carbon neutral outfit by handing out 25,000 bags into which customers and employees can pop their old mobile handsets for recycling.
The Register breaking news

ICANN releases new dotcom contract

Internet overseeing body ICANN has released a revised contract for all dotcoms which it hopes will finally end a huge legal fight at the heart of the internet.

i-mate extends Jam PDA phone line-up

PDA vendor i-mate has posted details of its latest model, the Jamin - also known as the HTC Prophet - on its website ahead of next week's anticipated launch date.

Security vendors open another front against spyware

The three biggest anti-virus vendors have teamed up with testing labs to develop standards for spyware detection.
DVD it in many colours

Vendors hold Itanium bake sale

A cavalcade of the Itanium processor's biggest supporters gathered last week at a fundraiser for the struggling processor. At stake is the processor's very existence, and the vendors vowed not to let their warm, large friend die before meeting its full potential.