11th > October > 2005 Archive

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Sony Ericsson flagship sprouts 3G, Wi-Fi

Sony Ericsson has updated its flagship P-series smartphone line by announcing a model with 3G, 802.11b. The manufacturer has also beefed up the camera and display, and finally added BlackBerry Connect and VoIP support in the bundle.
server room

Sun takes UltraSPARC IV+ upmarket

Sun Microsystems will finish what it started with the UltraSPARC IV+ chip, bringing it to midrange and high-end Solaris systems in the near future.

SAS sees Grids stopping 'paralysis'

A technology sector is starting to become serious business when the competitors in that market start sniping at each other. It can often be dismissed as just one of the regular spectator sports put on by IT vendors, but it can also raise some serious questions for users.

Man with 130 IDs steals £1m

A conman who established 130 false identities to defraud UK banks out of £1.1m was jailed for five-and-a-half years on Monday. Kanagaratnam Ganan, 33, used 129 false Indian passports and one bogus Sri Lankan passport as well as forged utility bills to open up bank accounts. After establishing a history of paying bills he sought credit facilities before scarpering with the loot, leaving banks chasing a ghost.
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Yahoo! goes ga-ga for podcasting

Yahoo! has launched a site that helps people find and listen to podcasts.
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Inland Revenue threatens EDS over tax fiasco (again)

The Inland Revenue is again threatening to sue EDS over the failure of its tax credit system.

PayPal buys VeriSign payment unit

Paypal is paying $370m for VeriSign's payment portal business.

Check Point Snorts up Sourcefire

Check Point has promised to support the open source Snort community following a $225m cash and stock acquisition of security tools firm Sourcefire last week. The deal, which is subject to regulatory approval, is expected to close in Q106.
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Alternative Networks buys ICB

Alternative Networks - a London-based business-to-business telecoms reseller - has acquired rival Integrated Communications for Business Ltd for £6m and an earnout of up to £5m.
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Seagate fattens Barracuda for high-spec PCs

Seagate has begun shipping its latest desktop hard drive family, the Barracuda 7200.9. The new drives should start tipping up in "low-cost and Serial ATA servers, mainstream and high-performance PCs, PC gaming systems, and media PCs", within a few weeks.
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Estonia's local elections to be settled online

Estonia's online voting machinery is being put through its paces for the first time, as the country readies itself for local elections this weekend.
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Texas Chain Saw Massacre voted best horror film

Entertaining 1974 gorefest the Texas Chain Saw Massacre has secured top spot in a Total Film poll of the best horror films ever, pipping Halloween to the post in a top ten which includes The Shining, Rosemary's Baby and the splendidly-titled Cannibal Holocaust.

Users want ISPs to filter spyware

A majority of net users want their ISPs so block spyware traffic. Half (51 per cent) of 1,000 consumers quizzed by NOP said their service providers should block spyware apps - invasive programs that covertly snoop on user's online activities - while only one in 10 of those quizzed reckon employers should take responsibility for addressing the problem. End user attitudes to seldom offered spyware screening services from ISPs mirror attitudes to spam filtering when such services were in their infancy four or five years ago.
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Japanese giant WLTM UK reseller with view to LTR

Sony is running a UK reseller day to promoted its IPELA Networked Video Monitoring and CCTV product line up.

Fibernet ups revs, trims losses

Fibernet - the network services outfit that operates in the UK and Germany - has increased turnover and narrowed losses.
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Nations squabble over internet management

Delegates at a meeting in Geneva on Monday failed to reach an agreement on who should control the internet's addressing system. The meeting, which is being held in preparation of the World Summit on the Information Society in Tunis next month, degenerated into a farce when delegates argued over the right of the US to control the internet's addressing system.
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BT names Openretch 'Famous Five' prefects

BT has named the five people charged with ensuring that the UK's dominant fixed line telco provides the industry with equal access to its network.
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Kettles, frogs and fridges unite on the dark side

Letters The world was rocked yesterday by the news that PG Tips had designed a kettle that can be controlled by text message. Well, we were confident that this utterly astonishing news would provoke much serious and sensible discussion among our beloved readers. And boy, did it.
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Can we have another go at CryoSat, please?

The lead scientist on the CryoSat mission, Duncan Wingham, has called for the programme to be relaunched, arguing that the research it would have done is too important to leave aside.
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Thailand pulls plug on unregistered mobiles

From mid-November, unregistered mobile phones will not work in Thailand's southernmost three provinces - Narathiwat, Pattani and Yala - as the government pulls the plug as part of its ongoing war against insurgents in the region.

Infosys beats estimates

Offshoring specialist Infosys is predicting growth of 34 per cent for its full year after posting revenues of $524m for the second quarter ended September 30 2005.

Security pros savage Tsunami hacker verdict

Analysis Last week Daniel Cuthbert was convicted of breaking the Computer Misuse Act, fined £400, and ordered to pay £600 in costs. As an IT security consultant, it will be a long time before Cuthbert's reputation is restored and it is possible he will never work in the industry again.

Dell, HP and IBM hitch a ride to Intel's dual-core kegger in Paxville

At long last, Intel has delivered a dual-core Xeon processor and moved a step closer to matching rival AMD's Opteron chip. That's great news for Intel's largest server processor customers, particularly Dell which has loafed along without dual-core chip powered gear. Even though they have Opteron systems, HP and IBM benefit from Paxville's release too as they have large Xeon server franchises to protect and sell into. Here's a look at some of the Paxville-based servers announced by these vendors.
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Skills shortage is back

The UK will need thousands more workers with IP telephony, mobile and security skills by 2008.

Microsoft to shelve per processor prices for users willing to get virtual

Microsoft continues to surprise by being one of the most aggressive large software vendors on the virtualized software licensing front. The giant this week revealed a new licensing scheme that should save some customers money, if they use VMware or Microsoft's own Virtual Server partitioning products.
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Group pushes for faster Wi-Fi

A group of Wi-Fi manufacturers have formed a coalition in a bid to boost wireless speeds. The Enhanced Wireless Consortium (EWC), which includes 27 Wi-Fi industry leaders such as Apple, Cisco Systems and Intel, is attempting to speed up the development of the proposed IEEE 802.11n standard. The new wireless standard is expected to support speeds of up to 600 Mbps. This will provide support for applications that need higher data rates than currently available, such as HDTV streams, and allow information to be sent quickly. The new specification will also include interoperability with the current a, b and g standards.
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China to launch two-man space-pod

Early tomorrow morning, China will send its second crewed mission into space. It says two astronauts will spend several days living and working in orbit, conducting microgravity experiments.

Automatic software licence checks are 'users' choice'

Most business enterprises are finding it increasingly difficult to keep track of software licence compliance, with 72 per cent of firms manually tracking compliance, or carrying out no tracking at all, according to a report from the Software and Information Industry Association (SIIA).
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Microsoft gets Real for $761m

Real Networks has reached a $761m agreement to settle worldwide antitrust actions with Microsoft and integrate the company's media player and music services with Windows and Microsoft's search services.
homeless man with sign

For Apple, Halo effect eclipses Osborne effect

There can be little doubting that the iPod 'halo effect' now shines a positive light on Apple's Mac sales. Strong US educational sales, particularly into Higher Education, also helped the company shrug off fears of an 'Osborne Effect' prior to next year's move to Intel processors. In fact, Mac sales were up 48 per cent year-on-year. However fears about soft iPod sales caused Apple stock to drop 10 per cent in after hours trading.

AMD cheers banner Q3

AMD enjoyed broad success during its third quarter with notebook, PC and server chip sales increasing and driving record revenue totals. The strong processor group performance helped offset a still flagging memory business.