4th > October > 2005 Archive


Scaling the heights of Microsoft Management

Last week Microsoft hosted the "Best of Microsoft Management summit 2005" at its UK headquarters in Thames Valley Park, marking the first time it has run such an event in the UK.
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Yahoo! follows Google into print minefield

Unlike Google, Yahoo! has set off into the book scanning minefield without detonating any explosions. But that might be because it hasn't, as yet, gone near a mine. Yahoo!'s own book scanning plans went public today with the announcement of the Open Content Alliance, of which it is a founding member.
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Wi-Fi a basic human right, says SF Mayor

Newt Gingrich once proposed giving laptops to the homeless - at the same time as he was axing food and medical services for the poor. Now San Francisco's Mayor Gavin Newsom has borrowed a page from his playbook. Wi-Fi is a 'fundamental right', Newsom said today at a press conference.
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HP goes a bundle with Netscape

All new HP desktops and laptops sold in the US and Canada will come with pre-installed Netscape browsers.
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Can writing software be a crime?

Can writing software be a crime? A recent indictment in San Diego, California indicates that the answer to that question may be yes. We all know that launching certain types of malicious code - viruses, worms, Trojans, even spyware or sending out spam - may violate the law. But on July 21, 2005 a federal grand jury in the Southern District of California indicted 25 year old Carlos Enrique Perez-Melara for writing, advertising and selling a computer program called "Loverspy," a key logging program designed to allow users to capture keystrokes of any computer onto which it is installed. The indictment raises a host of questions about the criminalization of code, and the rights of privacy for users of the Internet and computers in general.
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Pipex gets tough with bandwidth hogs

Pipex has given its broadband punters just two weeks to rein back their net usage or face having their connection "traffic managed" during peak times.
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Toshiba asks US to ban Hynix Flash imports

Toshiba has taken its patent violation claim against Hynix to the US International Trade Commission (ITC), asking the organisation to block the import of allegedly infringing NAND Flash - the kind of memory found in MP3 players like the iPod Nano - products into the US.
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Finnish copyright protestors to lay siege to MPs

Opponents of Finland's proposed copyright laws are hoping for a good turnout today for a demonstration outside Parliament.
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AMD quietly unveils ML-42 mobile CPU

AMD has updated its price list to include the Turion 64 ML-42 mobile chip.
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Space scientists seek sprites, elves and jets

European space scientists are planning to put special cameras on board the International Space Station (ISS) to take a closer look at the phenomenon of giant lightning.
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Zombie bots clog internal networks

A significant chunk (12 per cent) of all scanning attacks found on a broadband service provider's network are launched from the machines of its own subscribers. That's according to a study by traffic management firm Sandvine which says its findings dispel the idea the broadband security involves only policing the borders between external and internal networks. Subscribers need to be protected from each other as well as external malicious hosts, it concludes.
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UK online ad market spend sets new record

Spending on online advertising in the UK looks set to top £1bn in the UK for the first time, fuelled by increased use of broadband.
DVD it in many colours

Google and Sun: press conference at six

Google and Sun are holding a joint press conference this evening to head off an orgy of speculation not seen since Ginger/Segway threatened to overload speculation networks earlier this century.
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Americans joined at the hip to tech

The average US citizen spends an astounding - or alarming, or both - nine hours a day in front of the TV, surfing the internet or jabbering away into his or her mobile, research from Indiana's Ball State University has shown. However, none of these is apparently enough for-tech addicted Americans, who spend 30 per cent of this "media time" on more than one device simultaneously - presumably scouring eBay for a second-hand PS2 while watching a TV ad for how the latest mobile phone will irrevocably change your life for the better.

Disabled woman sues RIAA

Justice can sometimes be poetic: the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), which has sued 14,800 people for using peer-to-peer networks, is itself being sued.
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Katrina web scammer arrested

A Florida man has been arrested and charged with four counts of fraud after receiving $40,000 (£22,700) in donations to fund mercy flights to the victims of Hurricane Katrina.
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Albatron launches Socket 754 SLi mobo

Albatron today announced its latest AMD-oriented Socket 754, ATX motherboard, the K8NF4X-754.
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Taiwan huffs and puffs at Google Earth

Taiwan has become the latest, er, country to go whining to Google Earth - not because the entertaining online service reveals high-res pics of air bases packed with black helicopters, but because those tiresome Americans insist on calling it "a province of China".
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MS 'quits' music licensing talks

Microsoft could be the first victim of the major record labels' attempts to force up digital music prices.

Hack attack linked to annular eclipse

Are hackers affected by lunar cycles? The question arises after we were sent a screenshot of the defacement of space.com yesterday morning. The attack happened hours before an annular eclipse reached Europe.
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World chip sales up 3.2% in August

World chip sales hit $18.6bn in August, the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) said today.
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Ingram punts wireless

Ingram Micro is running a pan-European marketing campaign to encourage resellers to: "Get Mobile, Stay Connected".
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eBay fraudster to repay £70k

A convicted eBay fraudster has been ordered to cough up £70,000 or face an extra two years behinds bars.

Microsoft to 'embrace' open source

When Microsoft's global head of platform strategy (a job title otherwise known as Chief Linux Slayer) says he wants the company to embrace open source, you could be forgiven for wondering if he is perhaps tiring of the executive life, and trying to get himself dismissed from his post.
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Mobile phone socks pull up in UK

We always thought Apple's iPod Socks were a silly idea, but the recent controversy over scratched Nano screens may persuade the case-less to reconsider investing in something soft to cushion their favourite portable music player's display.
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IBM pumps Unix line full of Power5+

IBM is aiming low with its highest-end processor to date. The company today kicked off the release of the Power5+ chip by announcing three new systems that slot into the low-end of its Unix server line, a new workstation and a server aimed at researchers. The lower-end servers coupled with a surprisingly slow introductory Power5+ speed may bother some customers who were looking for IBM to really flex its computing muscle in the near-term.
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The iPod Nano: scratchy, but slinky and you love 'em

Letters An iPod special, today, in recognition of the thousands of words you have sent us with your stories about scratched screens, the wonder and horror of using a mobile phone instead of an iPod to listen to your music, and your thoughts on just how much it costs to build an iPod Nano.
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Sun could be next exhibit at Computer History Museum

With just a couple hours to go before the Sun and Google press conference, industry speculation continues to run hot and heavy around what the two companies might reveal. As usual, however, El Reg has outclassed rival publications and moved past the gossip to nail what will be announced.

Kaspersky in heap-based buffer overflow vuln

Users of Kaspersky anti-virus were warned this week of a potentially serious security vulnerability. The bug - unearthed by security researcher Alex Wheeler - involves a heap-based buffer overflow vulnerability related to the processing of malformed CAB archives.
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Earthlink wins Philly Wi-Fi gig

ISP Earthlink has won the contract to provide a citywide Wi-Fi network for the city of Philadelphia, beating out Hewlett Packard at the final stage of the municipal beauty contest.
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Sun and Google tool around together

Despite what Google-intoxicated hacks would have you believe, Sun and the search engine company have not created a stunning anti-Microsoft alliance. They have not teamed to end Office's dominance. They haven't done vast amounts of business together. No, Sun and Google have paired to promote the Google toolbar as an option when users download Java. Tremble not, Redmond.
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The Hollywood crisis that isn't

Analysis Barely a week has gone by without reports of Hollywood's great box office slump of 2005. So our thanks go to screenwriter John August for pointing out that on closer examination, the 'slump' is as elusive as missing Weapons of Mass Destruction.
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Ireland counts the cost of MIT Media Lab fiasco

The Irish government invested $40m of taxpayers' money in MIT's Media's Lab Europe - and has bugger all to show for it.
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iPod Nano vs washing machine: who wins?

With surprising regularity, Britain's Daily Mail, a mid-market tabloid, runs a heartwarming story about a puppy or kitten that has survived some awful domestic appliance encounter (trapped in the washing machine/freezer/breadmaker) and is photographed, bedraggled, in the aftermath. Everyone go "Awwww!"