14th > September > 2005 Archive

For Sale sign detail

How PalmOS lost it - readers

You're not exactly backward in coming forward, are you? In the latest twist of PalmOS soap opera last week, Japanese mobile browser company Access bought PalmSource. Could Palm's fate have been any different, we asked. This selection of views contains pretty strong language - so be warned.
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Teachers take timid approach to classroom tech

Teachers are generally reluctant to go high tech in the classroom, fearing that electronic white-boards and laptops could interfere with the teaching process.
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Google and Microsoft both claim victory in court

The cliché that no one wins in court but the lawyers was turned on its head yesterday when both Google and Microsoft claimed victory in their ongoing fight over former Redmond employee Kai-Fu Lee.

CopperEye for the database guy

There are two points of view on databases. Database experts tend to be enthusiastic, as you'd expect, and point to excellent scalability; business resilience (including transaction processing and automated backup/restore) and the availability of utility programs that let you add functionality without programming. Others sometimes regard the whole idea as a con and point to the greater efficiency with which any single function can be coded with specialist code and a simple data structure such as ISAM (indexed sequential access method), although indexing can constrain scalability and flexibility.
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Techscape: on Gore, Clinton and the internet

Interview Dean Laura Tyson of the London Business School (LBS) is a former University of California at Berkeley Professor of Economics, Dean of its Haas School of Business and ultimately President Clinton’s Economic Advisor
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Uk.com wildcard raises Net stability worries

A decision by British company CentralNic to make all unregistered domains ending with "uk.com" direct to its own webpage has raised concerns over the future stability of the Internet.
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New logo leaves Quark green at the gills

LogoWatch Quark has got itself into a bit of a rumpus over its new logo - described as "fresh, inviting, and open" by the company, but also as "indeed uncanny" by a Scottish Arts Council (SAC) spokesperson for its, well, indeed uncanny resemblence to the SAC brand frontage.
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Google blog search lives

Google has at last launched the beta version of its blog search engine. You can have a look here.
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186K buys Mailbox

Business ISP 186k has snapped up London-based provider Mailbox Internet.
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Cassini spots its first spokes

Imaging scientists working on the data from the Cassini spacecraft have identified ghostly spokes in Saturn's rings.
hands waving dollar bills in the air

Intel chips cost $40 to make - report

It's not hard to see how Intel makes its money. According to market watcher In-Stat, the chip giant's average cost per die is a mere $40 - significantly less than it the prices it attaches to its processors.

Microsoft's delay to patch fuels concerns

Microsoft's decision to cancel a security fix after finding problems with the patch has security experts questioning whether waiting for the fix to come next month might leave them open to attack.

OK to depict call centre workers as chickens

The Call Centre Association Ltd - an industry body representing 700 organisations - has failed to get a commercial depicting call centre workers as chickens banned from UK TV screens.
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Airgo third-gen Wi-Fi chip outperforms 100Mbps Ethernet

Wi-Fi chip maker Airgo today said it has begun sampling its third-generation, 'Gen3' MIMO chip, which it maintains will offer raw wireless data transfer rates of up to 240Mbps.
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Fetish club sets up on Home Secretary's turf

A concerned Register reader from Norwich has got in touch with some disturbing news from the constituency of liberty-eating Home Secretary Charles Clarke.
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Debutante Xena provokes planetary punch-up

A fight has broken out between two groups of astronomers over who exactly has the bragging rights over the discovery of the possible 10th planet Xena.
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US games watchdog orders hidden-content audit

US games software watchdog the Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) has told games publishers they must reveal any hidden content included in all the software they have released since 1 September 2004.
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O2 confirms 3G, Wi-Fi smart phone

O2 UK has formally announced the O2 XDA Exec, the network's own-brand version of HTC's Universal 3G clamshell smart phone.
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Apple iPod Nano

Review Unless you were hiding in a cave last week, you'll have heard about the latest changes made to Apple's iPod range. Out went the iPod Mini, which on the surface seemed like a strange decision. The Mini enjoyed a fanatical reception from the millions of style-conscious consumers who realised that they'd never fill a 20GB iPod no matter how hard they tried, while its smaller dimensions made it even cooler than the original white icon. However, when it comes to dimensions, the iPod Mini looks positively obese compared to its replacement, writes Riyad Emeran.
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Telstra sale given go-ahead

The Australian Government has moved a step closer to flogging its 51.8 per cent state in incumbent telco Telstra after winning a key vote earlier today.

More tech fails to exorcise security risks

Current IT systems are inherently insecure and growing complexity will simply increase these risks, a leading academic has warned.
DVD it in many colours

Sun adverts promise to offend

Sun Microsystems is well known for being quietly-spoken and polite. So it comes as quite a shock to us at Register Towers to hear that some of their latest server adverts have been rejected by "top business publications" as just too controversial.
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Researchers make twisted nanobelts

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have discovered a new, helical, zinc-oxide nanostructure that could be very useful to engineers working on nanoscale devices that rely on electromechanical coupling, such as sensors, resonators and transducers.

UK council pays £7.7m to escape outsourcing deal

Bedfordshire County Council has paid business service provider HBS £7.7m to terminate its £250m, 12-year outsourcing contract prematurely.

Eatoni sues RIM over SureType

Predictive-text technology developer Eatoni Ergonomics has asked the US District Court of Northern Texas to ban Research in Motion (RIM) from selling its Blackberry 7100 smart-phone family, claiming the devices violate the small company's intellectual property rights.
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TV to become web-like

IPTV - TV that's beamed over the net - is set to become the next big thing for boggle-eyed couch potatoes everywhere.
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Redbus and Demon founder appears in court

Internet pioneer Cliff Stanford yesterday went on trial at Southwark Crown Court on charges of unlawfully intercepting emails at his former company, Redbus Interhouse, according to reports.
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Wobbly planet triggered massive methane burps

Three huge eruptions of methane 180 million years ago triggered a catastrophic increase in global temperatures, according to research funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). The results, which are published in the current issue of Nature, could provide clues about the global warming process most scientists agree we are experiencing today.

Eolas cashes in on Katrina

Eolas, the one-man software outfit which took Microsoft to the cleaners in a patent dispute, has given its new software launch a topical spin.