17th > March > 2005 Archive

channel

'Get a lawyer!' Sun tells developers

"People struggle with what open source means, because there are all these licenses," said James Gosling Wednesday, as Sun unveiled two more.
channel

Google's X Files disappear

Google has unceremoniously, and without comment, yanked its latest labs "project" after less than twenty four hours. In 'Google X' a software engineer had replaced the main text navigation bar on the Google home page with a Mac OS X-style dock. A row of eight icons zoomed and shrank as the mouse hovered over them, the row itself shuffling to make room for the expansion - exactly like Mac OS X's dock.
channel

Matsushita readies iTunes-friendly music player

Japan's Matsushita has introduced an iTunes-compatible digital music player with an expandable storage capacity provided by SD cards to its D-Snap line of devices.
For Sale sign detail

BT automates talking book production

Blind and partially sighted people in the UK could soon have better access to a wider variety of books and publications thanks to a prototype voice synthesiser developed by BT.
The Register breaking news

Voda punter receives mobile manhood snap

Vodafone has launched an urgent investigation after a member of its customer support staff sent a picture of his penis to a customer's mobile phone.
graph up

Why power plants need anti-virus

Analysis Utility companies are been urged to review cyber security risks as the industry moves over from proprietary technologies to cheaper Windows-based systems. Attendees at an Industrial Cyber Security Conference in London on Tuesday 15 March were told that the control systems of utilities are becoming open to the kinds of attacks that bedevil corporate systems, such as computer worms and DDoS attacks, as power and water companies embrace the net.
The Register breaking news

Chip and PIN: Caveat vendor

Comment I have recently been working on a study into electronic payments. I have also looked at the internal systems of one of the card issuers, and have been looking at the experiences of a start-up business. My conclusion is that whilst ecommerce is a win-win situation for the big banks and card issuers, it is a case of pity the poor trader!
The Register breaking news

Philips claims 'super Flash' memory breakthrough

Scientists at Philips have developed a material for non-volatile memory chips that's not only better than Flash in almost every respect, but keeps on getting better the smaller you shrink the memory cells.
For Sale sign detail

Cyber cops foil £220m Sumitomo bank raid

A hi-tech bid to steal £220m ($423m) from the London offices of the Japanese bank Sumitomo Mitsui has been foiled by police. A gang of cyber crooks compromised Sumitomo's computer systems in October 2004 prior to an unsuccessful attempt to transfer money to a series of 10 accounts overseas, the FT reports.
The Register breaking news

World cools to big bad Wolfowitz

There has been a mixed international reaction to the announcement that US president George Bush has nominated Paul Wolfowitz as next head of the World Bank. Bush described the hawkish US deputy defence secretary - an enthusiastic proponent of the war in Iraq - as a "compassionate, decent man". UK foreign secretary Jack Straw concurred, applauding Wolfowitz as "very distinguished and experienced internationally".
channel

Enta runs MS Small Business Server promo

Enta has launched a three-month campaign to teach dealers how to work-up sales opportunities with Microsoft Windows Small Business Server 2003 (SBS) and Intel.
The Register breaking news

'Desperate' Qwest ups bid for MCI

Qwest looks set to cough up more cash in a bid to secure the acquisition of MCI, according to reports from the US. Sources maintain that the US telco has found an extra $550m to snap up MCI.
cloud

UK DrinkorDie members convicted of software piracy

Two UK software counterfeiters who styled themselves as "latter-day Robin Hoods" were convicted of software piracy offences this week.
The Register breaking news

Black holes in production in New York

Researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York have created a very short-lived, very tiny black hole, or at least, a fireball that behaved quite a lot like one for a millionth of a billionth of a billionth of a second.
The Register breaking news

Silicon Valley pleads for Federal aid

The US government must pump more money into nanotechnology research to ensure future generations of Americans can drive ever bigger cars.
Joe Fay, 17 2005
The Register breaking news

Appeals court hits redial on mobile phone lawsuits

The mobile phone industry faces fresh challenges in the US after appeal judges on the fourth US Circuit Court of Appeals reinstated five class-action lawsuits claiming that manufacturers have failed to protect consumers from dangerous radiation.
The Register breaking news

T-Mobile delays 3G Wi-Fi phone debut

T-Mobile's German operation has put back the release of its clamshell 3G-enabled Windows Mobile smart phone to the Autumn, according to the company's web site.
The Register breaking news

EU fusses over cyberhumans

The European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies (EGE) has called for regulation of the field of "information and communication technologies" (ICT) implants in humans, citing privacy and data protection concerns surrounding the burgeoning technology.
The Register breaking news

Olympus m:robe 500i media player

Preview Olympus is a camera company, isn't it? Not if its latest product is anything to go by. Deciding that the MP3 player market might be the place to make a quick buck, the imaging company that has in the past brought us gems like the One system and the Mju is now trying its hand at portable media players, too, writes Stuart Miles.
The Register breaking news

Hydrogen cars by 2012 says DaimlerChrysler

DaimlerChrysler has announced that it will be ready to launch its first hydrogen-powered car by 2012. A company spokesman made the announcement in tandem with Shell Hydrogen at a hydrogen car technology exhibition in Brussels.
The Register breaking news

Oz BitTorrent sites close on raid fears

Australian BitTorrent sites have started to shut down in an attempt to protect themselves from increasingly aggressive tactics employed by the Australian music industry anti-piracy operation.
The Register breaking news

Virgin Mobile slags off easyMobile...

Virgin Mobile and easyMobile appear to be locked in a slanging match as they seek to rubbish each other's service.
channel

GFI Informatique pulling out of UK, Northern Europe

GFI Informatique is moving ahead with its plan to offload its Northern European operations, the French services group said as it announced its 2004 results this week.
The Register breaking news

Say what you like about Saturn: its moons really have atmosphere

Cassini has found another Saturnian moon with an atmosphere: this time, it is Enceladus. The discovery was made during two recent flybys by the NASA space craft.
The Register breaking news

Dell quits 'white box' PC biz

Dell will no longer sell resellers unbranded PCs, and hasn't offered any so-called 'white box' machines since the beginning of the year, the PC giant has admitted.
The Register breaking news

Thieves raid BT exchange

BT has tightened security at its telephone exchange in St Albans after thieves nicked £100,000 of computer and IT gear.
channel

The strange decline of computer worms

Computer worms are becoming less commonplace as virus writers diversify their malware spreading tactics to create the maximum effect for the least possible effort. Email-borne worms, such as NetSky, Bagle and Sober, remain perennial favourites with malware authors but Slammer-style worms are becoming rarer, according to anti-virus firm F-Secure.
The Register breaking news

'We must now embrace the tele-phone' - dotcom pundit

A year ago Intel demonstrated a small contraption that allows people to talk to each other - even if they're not in the same room, without using wires or string. At the time we saw no possible use for such a device. Dogs, as we know, love fetching sticks - but this seemed to be much too fragile for robust outdoor activity. Intel called this the portable 'tele-phone'.