11th > March > 2005 Archive

The Register breaking news

Nokia nails N-Gage to its perch

Nokia has vowed to give the Norwegian Blue of its phone portfolio - the N-Gage console - a fresh lick of paint.
The Register breaking news

Intel's Q1 'a little better' than expected

Intel today tightened its first quarter revenue forecast to reflect stronger than usual sales.
For Sale sign detail

New SanDisk drive lets your fingers do the storing

SanDisk is always trying to make the bland idea of a USB storage drive seem as hi-tech as possible. And its latest attempt to make flash flashy comes in the form of a drive equipped with a fingerprint scanner.
homeless man with sign

Time-drift technique fingers PCs

Security researchers have developed a technique for remotely fingerprinting an electronic device using clock skews - small, microscopic deviations in device hardware. In a paper, Remote physical device fingerprinting, Tadayoshi Kohno, lead author and PhD student from the University of California San Diego, explains how the technique could be developed to track hardware wherever it is on the net, or in applications such as computer forensics.

Slim Devices adds 802.11g to wireless MP3 player

Slim Devices will ship the second generation of its Squeezebox wireless music device at the end of the month, the company revealed this week.
The Register breaking news

UK tagging for 'terror plotters' goes live on freed suspects

The UK's 'tagging for terror suspects' programme began yesterday with the release on bail of one of the Belmarsh detainees. A further eight inmates are expected to be released today, although the legislation under which they are being bailed currently expires at midnight on Sunday.
arrow pointing up

Tech Data Q4 profits jump on tax settlement

Tech Data had a good fourth quarter, generating revenues of $5.6bn , up 14.2 per cent on the same quarter last year. Net income improved too, up from $38.9m in Q404 (which ended January, 2004) to $59.3m this time around.
graph up

MS calls for US patent reform

Microsoft yesterday called for reform of the US patent system, claiming that the long-term health of the system is threatened both by a flood of patent applications and an "explosion of sometimes-abusive litigation". That's how MS general counsel Brad Smith put it during a speech to the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, DC.

Massive web trawl nets spammers

A 'comprehensive' sweep of the net by 70 law enforcement organisations from 26 countries should help authorities combat phishers, spammers and scammers, says a leading consumer protection agency.
The Register breaking news

Global DSL tops 100m

More than 35m new DSL lines were wired up around the world during 2004 as demand for broadband continued to soar. >By the end of 2004 there were 97m DSL lines around the world - an increase of 60 per cent on the year, according to research from PointTopic.

MS UK locks in schools via 'special terms' sponsorship deal

A sponsorship deal between Microsoft and the Department for Education and Skills has positioned the giant to be the dominant supplier in English schools, and according to Register sources is already causing some schools to cancel open source projects "in case they upset the sponsor [i.e. Microsoft] or the DfES failed their bid." The rules of the mechanism Microsoft has used, sponsorship for 100 applicants for specialist schools status, at a claimed value of £1.5 million, appear to have been relaxed or even subverted, the effect being to tilt the playing field dramatically in Microsoft's direction.
The Register breaking news

Wi-Fi security is getting worse

London businesses are letting the security of their wireless networks slip, leaving themselves exposed to drive-by hacking.
The Register breaking news

Fujitsu CTO ponders immortality

CeBIT 2005 Fujitsu’s CTO came over philosophical at CeBIT yesterday, pondering how nano-technology meant some lucky souls could end up being around as long the plastic parts of the PC you’re reading this on.
Joe Fay, 11 2005

Yahoo! comes under Xfire

Online gaming platform and community Xfire has counterattacked in a IM patent punch-up which saw Yahoo! last month file suit against the company.
fingers pointing at man

Sun could plug Sparc into utility grid

Sun Microsystems could become AMD’s biggest customer as its Opteron-based Sun Grid service takes off in earnest this spring, but the RISC giant may yet use its own Sparc architecture to help power the computing “utility” offering.
Joe Fay, 11 2005
The Register breaking news

Samsung unveils 3GB HDD smart phone

CeBIT 2005 Samsung today announced what it claims is the world's first phone with a seven megapixel digital camera built in.
homeless man with sign

DVD+RW 8x drives to ship in 'coming months'

CeBIT 2005 The DVD+RW Alliance yesterday forecast the widespread introduction of 8x DVD+RW hardware and media in Q2 and held out the prospect of 16x speeds in the Autumn.
The Register breaking news

Dyson unleashes self-replicating hoover

Those readers living north of the border (that's Scotland, not Canada, btw) are today warned to be on their guard against shifty-looking hoovers with malevolent intent. The reason? Vacuum cleaner magnate James Dyson has developed an intelligent hoover which can order its own spare parts.

Corporates tackle security in-house

Eighty per cent of UK businesses concentrate on managing all security risks in-house, but 34 per cent are concerned that access to resources and IT skills affect on their ability to plan effectively. Half of the 300 UK IT managers quizzed in a Unisys-sponsored survey are concerned about issues such as their "capacity to manage" security updates and integrate systems.
The Register breaking news

High Court orders ISPs to name file-sharers

The UK High Court today granted the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) an order under which six UK ISPs must supply the names and addresses of 31 individuals alleged to "have uploaded large numbers of music files on to peer-to-peer filesharing networks", as a BPI press release puts it.
The Register breaking news

Beer is fattening, say fat beer-swilling readers

Letters Our astounding revelation that beer is not in fact fattening raised a few eyebrows among readers who thought we may have cooked the book on this one. Alright, we confess we omitted a few small details which didn't fit our view of beer as the elixir of the gods:

BOFH: Critical Mass of Geeks

Episode 9 So I'm having a quiet lager at a downtown pub whilst waiting for a presentation on wireless networking to start when I notice a brace of Windows geeks all jabbering away to each other. (You know the sort of thing - "I ported Server 2003 to my cellphone in Java in two days - want to browse my file share?" war stories, etc.)
The Register breaking news

Beware auction sites, says Citizens Advice

The UK's leading consumer advice charity is warning punters to be careful when buying goods over internet auction sites after seeing a sharp rise in the number of people who've been ripped off by unscrupulous traders.
The Register breaking news

Mobile phone gunman jailed

A man has been jailed for five years for firing a miniature gun disguised as a mobile phone handset. Two bullets from the miniature weapon were fired last July in a street in Nottingham.
The Register breaking news

Madrid plotter used ID stolen from Spanish mint, say police

The terrorists responsible for last year's Madrid bombings used at least one genuine ID document stolen from the Spanish Mint, according to a report in elconfidencial.com (Spanish language). Spain, according to UK Immigration Minister Des Browne, regards ID cards as valuable in the fight against terrorism, but this ID was one of a batch of 300 stolen from the Fábrica Nacional de Moneda y Timbre (FNMT), which prints banknotes, passports and IDs, in November 2002.
fingers pointing at man

Quantum previews SuperDLT

CeBIT 2005 As Quantum previews its next generation SuperDLT tape technology, called DLT-S4, at CeBIT, it has also acknowledged that LTO has won the battle for hearts and minds. Alongside the prototype drive, which will store 800GB of uncompressed data per cartridge, is something else new - a whole range of LTO, DDS-DAT and Travan tape drives and media, all bearing the Quantum logo.

Alternative browser spyware infects IE

Some useful citizen has created an installer that will nail IE with spyware, even if a surfer is using Firefox (or another alternative browser) or has blocked access to the malicious site in IE beforehand. The technique allows a raft of spyware to be served up to Windows users in spite of any security measures that might be in place.

IBM rediscovers ancient plan for renting powerful computers

A server announcement put out today by IBM has confirmed at least one thing - the computing gods have a sense of humor.
DVD it in many colours

Microsoft's Sun server fetish revealed

Shocking pictures leaked by a careless Microsoft blogger reveal a love that dare not speak its name. The photos from the Redmond campus are, in fact, so raunchy and audacious that a special Register editorial meeting was held to discuss whether or not they should even be discussed in an open forum. In the end, we decided to go ahead with the photos. It seemed like the right thing to do.
The Register breaking news

Microsoft pot calls Patent Office black

Comment Microsoft's chief lawyer has said the US Patent Office needs to be clean up its act - forgetting that cleanliness starts at home.
homeless man with sign

IDC's storage winners and losers

CeBIT 2005 EMC overtook its rivals to become the largest supplier of disk arrays in Western Europe in the last three months of 2004, as more and more storage became networked, but Europeans don't give a stuff for regulatory compliance, according to IDC analysts at the research company's annual CeBIT conference.
graph up

Chem student tames Microsoft's legal eagles

A not so bright Kent State University student has defeated the world's largest software company. Microsoft today dropped its lawsuit against David Zamos, and Zamos dropped his countersuit against Microsoft, The Register has learned. It seems that the public scrutiny over suing a student for moving a couple copies of software on eBay was too much for Microsoft to bear.