24th > February > 2005 Archive

Broken CD with wrench

IBM dominates dull Q4 server market

IBM continued to dominate a slow-growing worldwide server market during the fourth quarter, according to latest figures from Gartner. Server vendors moved a total of 1.87m units during the period - 6 per cent more boxes than they shipped in the same quarter one year ago. All told, customers shelled out $14.2bn in the fourth quarter compared to $13.5bn one year earlier. For the full year, the vendors shipped $49.5bn worth of servers on 6.7m units. This compares $46.1bn in revenue on 5.6m units in 2003. IBM showed the best mix of high-end and volume systems, as it held the revenue lead but ended only third in total shipments. IBM shipped $5.1bn in servers during the fourth quarter and was followed by HP with $3.9bn in sales, Sun with $1.4bn, Dell with $1.3bn and Fujitsu with $654m in sales. Dell enjoyed the strongest growth at 18 per cent. HP also had a strong quarter, growing 9 per cent. IBM grew 6 per cent, and Sun saw revenue shrink 5 per cent. HP outpaced all vendors in total shipments, moving 1.9m systems. Dell followed with 1.4m shipments, IBM moved 1m, Sun shipped 337,000 and Fujitsu shipped 229,000, Gartner said. ® Related stories Dell rejects idea of AMD defection AA goes Blue IBM douses Xeon servers with Hurricane Anti-Blair site sparks real-world row Sun adds speed and Fujitsu to server line
Ashlee Vance, 24 Feb 2005

Iranian blogger jailed for 14 years

An Iranian blogger accused of spying and counter-revolutionary activities has been jailed for 14 years. Newspaper editor Arash Sigarchi - whose blog criticised an Iranian crackdown on similar websites which has resulted in around 20 arrests - was himself cuffed in January on charges of "espionage, insulting the founder of Iran's Islamic Republic, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomenei, and current Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei", the BBC reports. The sentence immediately provoked protests from human rights organisation Reporters Without Borders, which called for Sigarchi's release. A spokesman said: "The authorities are trying to make an example of him. By handing down this harsh sentence against a weblogger, their aim is to dissuade journalists and internet-users from expressing themselves online or contacting foreign media." The outcome of Sigarchi's trial does not bode well for other Iranian bloggers still in custody - including Motjaba Saminejad who also criticised the regime's clampdown. International pressure from groups such as the Committee to Protect Bloggers - which designated 22 February as "Free Mojtaba and Arash Day" - is unlikely to cut much ice with the revolutionary courts. Nonetheless, campaign spokesman Curt Hopkins noted: "The eyes of 8 million bloggers are going to be more focused on Iran since Sigarchi's sentence, not less. The mullahs won't be able to make a move without it being spread across the blogosphere." ® Related stories US hosting provider pulls down Iranian site Iran president rejects net censorship slur Blocking Internet Porn in Iran
Lester Haines, 24 Feb 2005

'Rocket fuel' found in US breast milk

US research has found that perchlorate - a chemical used in rocket fuel and though to be linked to metabolic disruption in adults and mental retardation in children - is widely present in breast and cow's milk across the United States. According to a New Scientist report, perchlorate is made naturally in the atmosphere, and subsequently finds its way into the water supply. The US Environmental Protection Agency last week set a safe level of perchlorate for drinking water, and although the quantities in tested milk are below this, scientists warn that perchlorate's affect on iodine uptake in humans - coupled to a general decrease in dietary iodine intake - may pose a risk to health. Lead researcher Purnendu Dasgupta, a chemist at Texas Tech University, explains that "perchlorate knocks an iodine ion off a protein that transports the ion to the thyroid", leading to "iodine deficiency, which impairs thyroid development [which] is thought to be the main cause of mental retardation in young children". Dasgupta adds that people are just not getting enough iodine; that "dietary levels have fallen to half those in the 1970s"; and that "pregnant women are taking in just half the iodine they should." He warns: "We have a potential problem with iodine nutrition - and perchlorate on top of it can make things worse." Dasgupta's study took 36 breast milk samples from 18 states and 47 dairy milk samples from 11 states. Researchers discovered perchlorate in all but one dairy milk sample. The average level in breast milk was 10.5 micrograms per litre, and 2.0 micrograms per litre in dairy milk. The US Environmental Protection Agency safe level for drinking water is 24.5 micrograms per litre. This limit was recommended by a US National Academy of Sciences study, although NAS adds that a safe perchlorate exposure for a baby should be 4 micrograms per litre. Given perchlorate's potential effect on iodine uptake, Dasgupta advises people to up their intake in the form of iodine-rich dried seaweed capsules. "I want people to be activists about good iodine nutrition," he concludes. Other Texas Tech University scientists, meanwhile, are trying to work out why breast milk contains much greater levels of perchlorate than dairy milk. Developmental toxicologist Ernest Smith admits that the matter is "not clear", adding that just where the perchlorate is coming from is the "the million-dollar question". He speculates that lactating mums "could be getting the chemical from drinking store-bought milk and from eating food grown in perchlorate-tainted soil or irrigated with water containing the chemical". It is fairly certain, however, that it cannot be coming from rocket fuel, since many of the states tested "are not known to host rocket launches", as Smith guardedly puts it. ® Related stories Space launches make kids sick
Lester Haines, 24 Feb 2005

TUC to IT workers: 'You're working too hard'

IT workers put in more unpaid overtime than almost any other profession, according to the TUC (Trades Union Congress). The organisation is calling on managers to recognise the extra time their staff puts in, and has declared Friday 25 February "Work your proper hours day". IT managers work an average of nine hours and 12 minutes per week on top of their official, contracted hours, a new league table reveals. The TUC calculated that if managers did all this unpaid overtime at the start of the year, they wouldn't start to be paid until 8 March. If they were paid for the extra hours, their salaries would increase by more than £10,000. IT workers don't fare much better, clocking up an average of six hours and six minutes unpaid overtime each week, making 17 February their first paid working day. (Our congratualtions to all of you who started getting paid last week.) All these donated hours are worth more than £5,000 to their employers. Tech companies also have the greatest proportion of staff working overtime for free. An average of 40 per cent of the workforce, including staff from all departments, puts in extra hours. The news should come as some consolation to managers worried that IT staff spend too much time sending personal emails. Brendan Barber, TUC general secretary, argues that many companies would collapse without the extra time put in by staff. Although most people are happy to put in the time when it is needed, in emergencies, or in the run up to a deadline, it can easily get taken for granted, and be built into the expected working week, he warned. "Work Your Proper Hours Day is a once a year opportunity for bosses to say thank you to their staff for their extra work, and for employees to remind themselves just how much extra time they would have if they did go home on time every day," he said. Tech staff are not alone in their dedication to duty: teachers work more than 11 hours unpaid overtime each week, and those in public service roles, like the armed forces, fire brigade or ambulance staff, put almost ten extra hours each week. ® Related stories BT workers demand 8% pay rise UK techies blow 17 days a year yakking to mates UK firms avoid outsourcing tech support
Lucy Sherriff, 24 Feb 2005

Easynet invests more in LLU

Easynet plans to spend £3m upgrading and promoting its own brand of unbundled broadband. Easynet has earmarked £2m to upgrade its local loop infrastructure during the first three months of the year. A further £1m is to be splashed out in marketing and support costs. This additional investment comes as the UK broadband operator reiterated that it remains "confident of signing a number of contracts in the first half of 2005" for its LLUStream product. Launched in December, LLUStream is a wholesale broadband service that the telco claims is between 30-35 per cent cheaper than BT. Using its own kit installed in BT exchanges via a process called local loop unbundling (LLU), Easynet is offering operators the chance to provide unbundled services direct to end users using its new LLUStream product. Middlesbrough-based ISP Onyx was the first to sign up to the service and Easynet remains upbeat that other deals will follow shortly. Publishing prelims for the year to the end of December Easynet saw revenues rise 24 per cent to £144.1m compared to £116m at the end of 2003. At the same time Easynet managed to narrow its operating loss to £13.9m down from £15.1m, and insists that it remains on track to turn cash flow positive during Q2 and to turn EBIT (earnings before interest etc) positive by the end of the year. Seeing "opportunity in our wholesale LLU service LLUStream" chairman Keith Todd said: "The changing regulatory environment in the UK has provided further stimulus to the market for 'next generation' Broadband services and we are well positioned to capitalise on this during 2005." Shares in Easynet were down 7.5p (7.46 per cent) at 93p in early trading. ® Related stories Easynet upbeat about wholesale LLU Onyx hooks up with unbundler Easynet Onyx hooks up with unbundler Easynet
Tim Richardson, 24 Feb 2005
graph up

AMD invests in Intel accuser

AMD has invested in the small chip technology development company that's suing Intel for alleged patent infringement. Patriot Scientific this week confirmed that AMD has bought an undisclosed number of the company's restricted shares and licensed not only its ShBoom processor patent portfolio but also its Ignite 32-bit processor design. The financial terms of the deal were not made public. AMD is the first company to license ShBoom. In January 2004, Patriot sued Sony, Fujitsu, Toshiba, Matsushita and NEC for alleged infringement of patent number 5,809,336, which it owns. The company sued them because they had shipped product containing Intel processors that it also claimed violated its intellectual property rights. If the move was intended to force Intel to license the patent, it failed - Intel countersued, and was itself sued by Patriot in February 2004. Patriot is seeking monetary damages to the tune of "several hundreds of million dollars" for the alleged infringement. Since then, Patriot has notified 150 other companies that it believes their products infringe its patent, though as yet it has not initiated legal proceedings against them, undoubtedly while it awaits the outcome of its action against Intel. Patent 5,809,336, entitled 'High performance microprocessor having variable speed system clock', covers "the means used by the microprocessor industry to increase the internal operating speed of modern microprocessors", according to Patriot. It maintains that any CPU "operating at speeds above 110-120MHz may be in violation of portions of our patent portfolio", according to CEO Jeff Wallin. That may be one of the reasons AMD chose to reach a settlement with the company. AMD's interest in Ignite is also interesting. Ignite is a Risc-like 32-bit processor core with a strong SIMD component. According to Patriot, multiple Ignites can work together within the company's InFlame architecture to create a multi-SIMD processor not so dissimilar to the architecture Sony and IBM have been discussing of late as 'Cell' - the CPU technology that will power the PlayStation 3. ®
Tony Smith, 24 Feb 2005
channel

Seagate, Hitachi launch 1in 6GB HDDs

Seagate and Hitachi both announced 1in hard drives with a 6GB storage capacity this week, though the US company appears to have been the first to ship such a product. Seagate's 6GB ST-1 unit started shipping last December, the company said yesterday, and may well be the storage component found in Apple's latest iPod Mini, unveiled yesterday too. Certainly when news of a higher-capacity iPod Mini emerged late last year, it was suggested that the new machine would not contain a Hitachi drive as the first version had done, Apple allegedly having been annoyed with the problems the drive maker experienced ramping up production of its 4GB 1in unit, the Microdrive 3K4 Hitachi's new, 6GB drive, the 3K6, is set to ship in a couple of months' time. The 16g unit will ship in two forms, one with a CompactFlash Type II connector, the other with an IDE interface. The drive can withstand 200G of operating shock and 2000G of shock when the unit is in stand-by mode, Hitachi claimed. It spins at 3600rpm, and provides an average seek time of 12ms. There's 128KB of on-board buffer RAM. Seagate did not provide comparable specifications for its product, preferring to discuss its RunOn and G-Force resilience systems more broadly, touting the suitability for mobile devices such as PDAs and MP3 players. ® Related stories Apple revs iPod, cuts prices Maxtor to axe more US jobs Hitachi brings IDE to 1.8in HDD line Maxtor cans notebook HDD project Western Digital hops on 1in HDD bandwagon Seagate hints at job cuts despite 'strong' quarter Apple 'readies' 5GB iPod Mini Samsung shows 'world's first' hard drive phone
Tony Smith, 24 Feb 2005

UK.gov launches virus advice site

The UK government launched an official virus alert site yesterday. ITsafe is designed to help home users and small businesses use the net more safely through a combination of free advice and threat alerts about risks such as fast-spreading computer viruses. Users can sign up to receive alerts by either text or email. The service is funded by the Home Office and uses information provided by the National Infrastructure Security Co-ordination Centre (NISCC) - the Government’s centre for electronic defence. An estimated 13m UK homes have net access. As professional cyber criminals have turned their attention towards exploiting security weaknesses in the consumer market to distribute spam or in phishing attacks the need for an IT security advice site has grown. Home Office minister Hazel Blears said: "There is a clear need for easy-to-understand and simple independent advice for non-technically minded people who use computers either at home or at work. The purpose of this new Government service is to ensure computer users are aware of the risks involved and how to deal with them easily and effectively without causing alarm." Worthy aims but early reaction to the site from Reg readers suggests considerable scope for improvement. "Apart from the fact it looks like it took all of five minutes to design and contains approximately nothing of use, the email sign-up service doesn't even send a confirmation email that you really did ask to subscribe," said Reg reader Simon Li. "A search for 'security' http://www.itsafe.gov.uk/cgi-bin/search.cgi?query=security manages to turn up threats such as 'clip art' and 'blog'." Doubtless these problems will be ironed out over time. The UK initiative is similar in aims to the US National Cyber Security Alliance's StaySafeOnline. ® Related stories Small.biz gets the virus jitters Small.biz gets more spam Big guns back UK IT security drive UK preps major security awareness campaign Small.biz crap at security (redux)
John Leyden, 24 Feb 2005
homeless man with sign

Intel prunes prices

Intel this week chopped up to 34.1 per cent off selected processors, following last week's Xeon DP refresh and the launch this week of 64-bit Pentium 4 processors for desktop PCs. The price cuts centred on the chip maker's desktop Celeron line-up, across both the 90nm Celeron D range and the older 130nm parts. Prices here fell by up to 13.6 per cent. The arrival of the 2MB-cache Xeon DP saw Intel push down the prices of the older 1MB-cache version by up to 34.1 per cent. It also trimmed 21.6 per cent off the price of the 1MB-cache 64-bit 3.2GHz Pentium 4 for servers and workstations. ® Intel February 2005 Price Cuts Processor Prev. Price New Price Change Celeron D (90nm, LGA775) 345J - 3.06GHz, 256KB L2, 533MHz FSB $127 $117 -7.9% 340J - 2.93GHz, 256KB L2, 533MHz FSB $117 $103 -12% 335J - 2.8GHz, 256KB L2, 533MHz FSB $103 $89 -13.6% 330J - 2.66GHz, 256KB L2, 533MHz FSB $83 $79 -4.8% 325J - 2.53GHz, 256KB L2, 533MHz FSB $79 $73 -7.6% Celeron D (90nm, Socket 478) 345 - 3.06GHz, 256KB L2, 533MHz FSB $127 $117 -7.9% 340 - 2.93GHz, 256KB L2, 533MHz FSB $117 $103 -12% 335 - 2.8GHz, 256KB L2, 533MHz FSB $103 $89 -13.6% 330 - 2.66GHz, 256KB L2, 533MHz FSB $83 $79 -4.8% 325 - 2.53GHz, 256KB L2, 533MHz FSB $79 $73 -7.6% Celeron (130nm, Socket 478) 2.8GHz, 128KB L2, 400MHz FSB $103 $89 -13.6% 2.7GHz, 128KB L2, 400MHz FSB $93 $89 -4.3% 2.6GHz, 128KB L2, 400MHz FSB $83 $79 -4.8% 2.5GHz, 128KB L2, 400MHz FSB $79 $73 -7.6% Xeon DP 3.6GHz, 1MB L3, 800MHz FSB $851 $690 -18.9% 3.4GHz, 1MB L3, 800MHz FSB $690 $455 -34.1% 3.2GHz D, 1MB L3, 800MHz FSB $455 $316 -30.6% 3GHz D, 1MB L3, 800MHz FSB $316 $256 -19% 2.8GHz D, 1MB L3, 800MHz FSB $209 $198 -5.3% Pentium 4 for servers/workstations 3.2GHz D, 1MB L3, 800MHz FSB $278 $218 -21.6% Related stories Intel brings 64-bit to desktop Intel steers Itanic core correction Intel boffins build first continuous beam silicon laser SiS signs Intel bus licence Intel ships 2MB cache 64-bit Xeon AMD slashes processor prices AMD unveils next-gen 90nm Opterons Intel 65nm desktop, server CPUs 'up and running'
Tony Smith, 24 Feb 2005

UK telco sector remains in doldrums

The UK's telecoms sector shows little sign of improving over the coming year as it continues to wrestle with "tough" conditions. This rather glum assessment coincides with the publication of results from alternative telco Colt, which has been busy "refocusing its business" and "implementing a new strategic plan". Turnover for the year ending 31 December, 2004 was up 7 per cent to £1.2bn while EBITDA (earnings before interest etc) slipped to £153.7m from £163.4m. Pre-tax losses before exceptional items fell by 15 per cent to £114.6m. Said Colt chairman Barry Bateman: "2004 was a tough year for the telecommunications industry and Colt. Nevertheless, turnover was up, losses were down and cash flow improved. We have entered 2005 in a stronger position having put in place the management team and strategic initiatives to move Colt forward to long term profitability. "We do not anticipate any significant improvement in market conditions during 2005," he added. Chin up. ® Related stories Falling prices hit COLT profits Colt gets new MD Rivals warn of BT 'delaying tactics'
Tim Richardson, 24 Feb 2005

Sony 'suspends' PSX production - again

The Register still receives plenty of emails asking when Sony's PSX PlayStation 2 PVR will ship in Europe. We don't know, but it's looking increasingly unlikely now that Sony has apparently stopped producing the Japanese version. According to an announcement on the Japanese PSX website, cited by German-language games news website GameFront, Sony has suspended production of the machine. No reason was given for the move. When we looked at the Sony site today, we couldn't see any obvious reference to such a move. However, Sony's online hardware sales site ominously notes that it is no longer selling either of the two current versions of the PSX, the 160GB DESR-5500 and the 250GB DESR-7500. It's worth recalling that Sony has been here before. The original PSX, again in two versions, the DESR-5100 and DESR-7100, shipped in Japan in December 2003. In April 2004, however, Sony suspended production of both models to allow local sales channels room to clear their stocks of unsold machines. That appeared to sound the death knell for the PVR, but Sony bounced back in July with two updated models, the 5500 and the 7500. It's possible Sony is planning a similar update for 2005, using the same tactic to clear out inventory of the current line-up. As for a European launch, it's looking unlikely. Last July, Sony admitted that its original plan, to ship the PSX in Europe and the US in 2004, had fallen by the wayside in a bid to make the technology more appropriate for Western users. Then, the plan was to ship the PSX in the US sometime in 2005, with a European launch unscheduled at that time. ® Related stories Stores slash PSX prices - report Sony delays UK, US PSX launch Sony to ship new PSX models on 1 July Sony pauses PSX production Sony ships second PSX update Sony 'confirms' 2004 PSX European launch Sony preps PSX update as retailers criticise marketing
Tony Smith, 24 Feb 2005

Ebbers trial team begins defence

The WorldCom fraud trial in New York entered a new phase yesterday after the prosecution concluded its case against former chief exec Bernie Ebbers. Prosecution lawyers have tried to show that Ebbers - who denies the charges against him - masterminded the fraud. In more than two weeks of questioning only former CFO Scott Sullivan - who has already pleaded guilty to his part in the $11bn (£5.8bn) collapse of the telecoms giant in 2002 - has linked Ebbers with the accounting scandal. Yesterday, defence lawyers called on US District Judge Barbara Jones to throw out the case against Ebbers because they claimed that the prosecution had failed to prove that the book-fiddling at the centre of the case was fraudulent. The call for the mistrial was rejected by Judge Jones. The defence has now called on whistleblower and former internal auditor Cynthia Cooper as their first witness. She was one of the first people to lift the lid on the WorldCom accounting scandal. USA Today reports that Cooper is expected to testify that her investigations link Sullivan, not Ebbers, to the fraud. ® Related stories Ebbers was 'intimidating' boss WorldCom CFO lied, he admits to court Ebbers trial halted 'till Wednesday Ebbers failed to tell of book fiddling Ebbers 'drove Worldcom fraud' - Sullivan Sullivan fingers Ebbers in WorldCom fraud whodunnit WorldCom directors $54m lawsuit deal unravels Ebbers fortune at risk as share prices slid Former Worldcom directors cough up $18m Ebbers never made 'an accounting decision' - witness Ebbers feared fortune would be 'wiped out' Ebbers knew of financial fiddling Ebbers' financial know-how probed Gloves off in Ebbers WorldCom fraud trial Ebbers fraud trial kicks off Ebbers faces WorldCom court showdown Former Worldcom directors cough up $18m MCI breaks free from Chapter 11 WorldCom gets sums wrong by $74bn Bernie Ebbers faces criminal charges
Tim Richardson, 24 Feb 2005

Global warming cleared on ice shelf collapse rap

The high-profile collapse of some Antarctica's ice shelves is likely the result of natural current fluctuations, not global warming, says a leading British expert on polar climates. This surprising finding is supported by analysis of data from the European Space Agency's ERS-1 satellite, according to Duncan Wingham, Professor of Climate Physics at University College London. The data, measuring changes in ice thickness across the Antarctic ice sheet using the polar orbiting satellite, show areas of growth from snowfall are as common as areas of decline. This is a contrasting picture to one based solely on the northern Antarctic Peninsula - a shark's fin of land jutting out from the body of the continent, and reaching to just 750 miles from Chile - where there has been a drastic increase in temperature, thinning of ice sheets and collapse of ice shelves. The Larsen A ice shelf, 1600 square kilometres in size, fell off in 1995. The Wilkins ice shelf, 1100 square kilometres, fell off in 1998 and the Larsen B, 13,500 square kilometres, dropped off in 2002. Meanwhile, the northern Antarctic Peninsula's temperatures have soared by six celsius in the last 50 years. "A lot of attention and research has focused on this relatively accessible area of the Antarctic Peninsula, but satellites are giving us a picture of the continent as a whole," Wingham told the Register. This broader picture shows evidence of growth and decay from place to place, a picture more in line with natural variations in snowfall and ocean circulation. The Antarctic is to some extent insulated from global warming because to its north are zonal flows in the atmosphere and ocean, unimpeded by other landmasses. This insulates the continent from warmer events further north and leads one to suppose it is better protected from global warming. "Taken as a whole, Antarctica is so cold that our present efforts to raise its temperature might be regarded as fairly puny. Change is undoubtedly occurring: in the collapse of the northerly Peninsula ice shelves, and elsewhere in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, where the circumpolar current appears to reached the ice edge and is eating away drastically at the ice shelves. One cannot be certain, because packets of heat in the atmosphere do not come conveniently labelled 'the contribution of anthropogenic warming'. "But the warming of the Peninsula has been going on for a considerable time, and the pattern of regional change is variable, and neither of these is favorable to the notion we are seeing the results of global warming". At the US station at the South Pole, temperatures have in fact fallen by a degree since 1957. "The Antarctic Peninsula is exceptional because it juts out so far north," Wingham explained. The professor continued: "I am not denying global warming. For instance, Greenland, in the northern hemisphere, does seem to be going. But Greenland's ice cap - Greeland is quite far south - is a last survivor from the ice age and only its height protects it. The more that cap melts, the more it will continue to melt as it gets lower and warmer. But Antarctica is different. Even in the Arctic I am sceptical of some claims that 40 per cent of the sea ice has already vanished, and that what remains is drastically thinning. "Sparse data from subs in some parts of the Arctic do seem to show a thinning trend, but our preliminary observations using satellite data point to large growth and decay from year to year and place to place, by as much a meter in just a few years. Here too natural variability is considerable. No one doubts that the ultimate fate of Arctic ice looks a grim one, but I believe we have too few data to be confident of how fast it will meet its fate." Prof Wingham, who is the Director of the UK's National Environmental Research Council's Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling, spoke to us after a European Union Space Conference in Brussels. He attended in his capacity as the Project Scientist of the European Space Agency's 130M euro "Cryosat" satellite mission, to be launched later this year and dedicated to spotting climate change in the polar zones. Earlier media reports after a conference on climate change in Exeter suggested it was "unclear" whether the collapse in the Antarctic ice shelves was due to global warming or not. Although the melt and collapse of the ice shelves does not raise sea levels initially, there is fear these shelves act as corks whose disappearance could lead to an outflow from landbased glaciers - which would increase sea levels. Related stories Computing network warns of massive climate change Europe to fry in one long, hot summer Clouds cloud climate modelling
Pelle Neroth Taylor, 24 Feb 2005

FBI issues Sober notice over Windows worm

Virus writers are attempting to scare surfers into opening malicious code with a message posing as an FBI notice that they have visited an "illegal website". Recipients are invited to open a "questionnaire", which is really the latest Windows worm Sober-K. To add authenticity infected emails come from a faked @fbi.gov address. The tactic, which recycles a trick first used over a year ago, prompted the FBI to issue a notice this week warning users to be wary of the ruse. "These e-mails did not come from the FBI. Recipients of this or similar solicitations should know that the FBI does not engage in the practice of sending unsolicited e-mails to the public in this manner," it said. The FBI said it is investigating the source of the Sober-K worm. As well as posing as "FBI investigation notices", Sober-K (which sends messages in either German or English) also poses as "x-rated movie clips" featuring Paris Hilton, the Fluffy Blonde Idiot. Sober-K has spread rapidly since its appearance earlier this week. Most anti-virus vendors rate is as a medium-risk nuisance. Emails infected by the Ahker-C worm, another new Windows virus, also use promises of "hardcore footage" of the ubiquitous Ms. Hilton as bait. The Ahker-C worm sends itself using the subject line "Paris Hilton...download it!" and an attached file called "ParisXXX.zip". The worm attempts to disable anti-virus and firewall software running on the computer. Ahker-C is generally rated as a low-risk nuisance. The batch of Paris Hilton-themed worms arrived this week after it emerged that hackers had broken into the society heiress's mobile phone address book, and published the private telephone numbers for celebrities such as Anna Kournikova, Lindsay Lohan and Vin Diesel. ® Related stories Bogus FBI warning file contains malware Sober worm speaks with forked tongue T-Mobile to probe Paris' security breach Paris Hilton's Sidekick hacked
John Leyden, 24 Feb 2005

Apple 15in PowerBook G4

ReviewReview Ten months is a long time to go without a hardware refresh in the PC industry. For Apple, whose top-end PowerBook notebooks pretty much defined the genre, it's an eternity. The introduction this month of new, speed-bumped PowerBooks thus felt enormously overdue - the delay had led many to expect the fabled PowerBook G5.
Charles Arthur, 24 Feb 2005

Euro MPs face scam crackdown

Euro MPs (MEPs) are due to vote on an amendment to the Unfair Commercial Practices Directive today which would crack down on telephone and internet scams. If agreed, the amendments tabled by Euro MP Diana Wallis, "will make telephone prize scams and rogue internet trading illegal". The Liberal Democrat MEP for Yorkshire and the Humber decided to act after receiving scores of letters from voters who have fallen victim to incessant and unwanted phone calls telling them they have won a prize. Said Wallis: "When the number is rung back the caller is strung along for a premium phone call usually lasting several minutes, costing up to a hundred pounds. Many of these traders base themselves in another country, for example, in Ireland, to escape action. "My amendment will help to get to grips with this both at home and abroad, by making this practice illegal." Wallis is also trying to introduce new laws to protect ordinary punters trading online through auction sites such as eBay. "There have been a number of instances of consumers misleading other consumers through websites such as eBay with vendors posing as a private seller or a seller's agent when they actually are acting as a business or trade," she said. "As consumers, they fall outside the normal consumer protection legislation and so no redress is available. Again my amendment will cover this malpractice." The changes were debated yesterday by Euro MPs and are expected to receive "overwhelming support", said Wallis. ® Related stories New 0871 rogue dialler scam spotted Citizens Advice warns of 'shocking' rogue dialler scams OFT in net spam scam crackdown UK targets scammers in month-long campaign
Tim Richardson, 24 Feb 2005

NTL email floored nationwide

Many of NTL's 1.4m internet punters are without email today following technical problems at one of the cableco's data centres in Winnersh near Reading. A spokesman for the UK's largest cable company was unable to provide exact details of the snag. However, he confirmed that the glitch is affecting NTL's internet customers nationwide. As a result, punters are unlikely to be able to access email although web browsing is understood not to be affected by the outage. Punters began suffering intermittent email problems two days ago but matters worsened overnight. One hacked off punter told The Register: "Their email service has been down for two days solid, forums are full of people complaining. Thousands can't get mail and connection to NTL sites is very off/on and general browsing appalling." An ntl tech support statement says: "Due to technical issues in one of our core sites ntlworld internet customers may currently be unable to access some, or all, of their incoming email accounts, and are likely to either see an error message, or be repeatedly asked for their username and password." Engineers are currently working to resolve the matter although at this stage the company is unable to say when the matter will be resolved. NTL has apologised to customers for the snag. ® Related stories NTL to trump BT in March assault Telewest, NTL unveil VoD services IBM shunts NTL tech support jobs to India NTL's CIO quits
Tim Richardson, 24 Feb 2005

BT rogue dialler court case delayed

A legal challenge to BT's decision last year to block access to numbers suspected of being used by rogue dialler companies has been delayed. Birmingham-based Opera Telecom was due to have its case against BT heard at the High Court tomorrow (Friday). It is suing BT for blocking access to lines Opera leases to adult content outfit Netcollex and is seeking compensation for lost revenues. However, the case has been postponed and is unlikely to be heard for another month or so. "Tomorrow's court hearing on rogue diallers has been postponed as Opera requested extra time to prepare their case," said a BT spokesman. ® Related stories BT sued for blocking suspected 'rogue dialler' numbers BT abandons scheme to block rogue diallers New 0871 rogue dialler scam spotted
Tim Richardson, 24 Feb 2005
server room

HP lifts the kimono on secure router

HP has announced the ProCurve Secure Router 7000dl series, a branch office router range with built-in security and mobile access features. The kit starts shipping in April and is cheaper than Cisco equivalents, HP says. By launching secure routers, HP is tapping into a growth area in anotherwise flat market. Worldwide enterprise router revenues were totalling $816m in 4Q04 and $3.4bn in 2004, down two per cent both for the quarter and the full year, analyst firm Infonetics Research estimates. Cisco dominates enterprise router sales with 84 per cent revenue share. The ProCurve Secure Router 7000dl extends HP's ProcCurve networking range from the LAN switch into the router market. 7000dl series routers will connect enterprise branch offices to wide area networks. They incorporate a firewall to help protect against denial of service attacks and support 802.1X authentication, a popular means to bolster the security of wireless networks. The devices also offer Virtual Private Network features, providing a means for SMEs to roll out remote access to workers. The first two products in the ProCurve WAN range are the 7102dl and 7203dl routers. The 7102dl has two slots and supports up to four T1/E1 connections. The 7203dl router features two slots and one wide slot to support modular WAN interface cards. It can support up to 12 T1/E1 connections. The 7102dl and 7203dl routers will cost between $1,499 and $2,999. Switching is bitching HP this week alsoannounced the April 2005 availability of an Access Controller Module for its ProCurve Switch 5300xl hardware. The technology costs from $5,499 and designed to remove the need for authentication software on a user's client, making it easier to roll-out secure WLAN access in larger organisations. In addition to web-based authentication, the Access Controller Module provides bandwidth control, misconfigured service management and proxy redirection. Earlier this month HP improved its 5300 switches and ProCurve Manager with HP Virus Throttle, software that restrict the spread of computer viruses on corporate LANs. Virus Throttle focuses on the behaviour of malicious code rather than on its content. This enables response to previously unseen threats without having updated anti-virus signatures. By slowing or blocking suspect traffic until administrators have time to act. Connection-rate filtering in the ProCurve Switch 5300xl enables users to avoid the debilitating bandwidth-hogging effects of worms such as Nimda.® Related stories HP raises wireless profile HP talks networks Cisco overhauls security line-up Cisco ups sales, misses estimates
John Leyden, 24 Feb 2005

Socially inadequate? Meet V-girl

There's some good news on the relationship front today for those heterosexual male readers who are tired of the trouble and expense of having a real girlfriend, or are just too ugly or dull to get their hands on the real thing - V-girl, aka Vivenne Rose. Vivienne is a virtual minx brought to you by the power of mobile technology. She's the offspring of Hong Kong-based Artificial Life Inc., offering lonely, desperate men the chance to have a distance relationship with a real computer via their throbbing 3G mobes. The man, ahem, behind Vivienne is Eberhard Schöneburg, a "former professor of artificial intelligence and neural networks who used to work on expert systems for German military projects", as the New York Times calmly explains. Schöneburg brought all the power of computerized voice synthesis, streaming video and text messaging technology to bear on V-girl, who is apparently able to chew the fat on 35,000 subjects - ranging from "philosophy to movies to sculpture" - as she moves effortlessly through her virtual world. So, what makes V-girl special, so special that someone would shell out hard cash for a date? Take it away, Vivienne: I have emotions I'll be your companion anywhere and anytime We can play Mini Games together I am fully dynamic Fully dynamic? Now you're talking. I'm not just another pretty face. I am supported by artificial intelligence. I am more than just a 3D bot. I act just like a real girl - I laugh, I cry, I flirt, I chat, I argue - I can even blow you kisses. Kisses? What about a shag? This is costing good money. We can have exciting conversations about all sorts of things. You can watch me as I go through my daily life. I will offer you... Yes, yes? ...companionship, commitment, entertainment and a whole lot more... however... Bloody hell, here we go... ... I will not have real or virtual sex with you, sorry! So what's the friggin' point of all this, then? The goal of the game is to make a new friend - a virtual friend - me! Anyone who needs a new friend so badly that he is willing to stump up to meet V-girl for a bit of "hands-where-I-can-see-'em-and-no-tongues" heavy texting should note that she will be available for hire in Singapore and Malaysia by the end of April, in Western Europe by late spring and "possibly in a few American cities by the end of the year". God preserve us all. ® Related stories Are you a mobe-hating foot fetishist? Xmas comes early for phone ad girl 10.48pm is best time to pull women: official
Lester Haines, 24 Feb 2005

LAN switches on fire

L2-L7 LAN switch revenue hit $3.8bn in the fourth quarter, up 22% on the year, according to latest research from Infonetics, with Cisco once again leaving its footprints all over the market. L2-L3 ethernet switch revenue dominated the market, taking $3.6bn of total sales, though this was down 3% on the previous quarter. Revenues in this sector should grow 2% over the coming year, the firm predicted. Gigabit is finally outpacing 10/1000M sales, added Infonetics. Cisco was the dominant vendor, surprise surprise, especially in the chassis market, and took 56% of the L2–L3 fixed configuration switch market by revenue and 29% by port share. However, the research group noted, the firm has been losing fixed configuration port share over the year to competitors like NETGEAR and D-Link. 3Com was second in L2-L3 fixed configuration share. Cisco leads the L4-L7 switch/load balancer segment without SSL segment with 44% revenue share and 43% port share, while F5 leads in L4-L7 switch/load balancers with SSL, taking 54% of revenue and 56% of ports. ® Related stories HP lifts the kimono on secure router 3Com issues profit warning Wireless kit sales on the up-and-up
Team Register, 24 Feb 2005

eBay plays down 'shill' bidding allegations

Giant auction site eBay is being sued for allegedly using "shill" bidding against its own customers to force up prices and increase the fees it's able to charge. The class action lawsuit filed in the California Superior Court in Santa Clara was brought on behalf of a Pennsylvania man who maintains he fell foul of eBay's "shill" bidding practice on at least two occasions. In one case Glenn Block claims his bid for a Xerox Copy Cartridge was increased from $111 to $112.5 despite the absence of any real competing bid. In another auction Block claims eBay's intervention raised his bid from $75 to $75.55. Although the sums involved are only small, multiplied by eBay's huge customer base they could add up to millions of dollars, said lawyers Lerach Coughlin Stoia Geller Rudman & Robbins LLP in a statement. The allegations centre on eBay's used of computer-generated responses that encourage the high bidder for an item to raise the ceiling on his bidding to ensure that he is not overtaken by another buyer. "Despite having been notified that he was the highest bidder, eBay raised the buyer's bid without any further competing bids. In these cases eBay effectively acted as an invisible shill bidder so as to pump the auction price higher," said lawyers acting on behalf of Block. eBay spokesman Hani Durzy told Reuters: "Based on what we know about what's being alleged, it appears the plaintiff completely misunderstands the functionality of the eBay bidding system." ® Related stories Euro MPs face scam crackdown Support for proposed eBay strike fades eBay backtracks as it cuts some fees Touts flood eBay with black market tickets 'Integrity of eBay markeplace' at risk - sellers' group
Tim Richardson, 24 Feb 2005
cable

Intel puts Itanium saviour on ice

Intel has plumped, constrained and then killed a future version of Itanium once meant to save the entire franchise, The Register has learned. The once elegant Tukwila processor with all of its eight glorious cores will now have just two or four cores, according to a source familiar with the processor's design. Intel has decided to equip Tukwila with a couple of fatter, more powerful processor cores instead of combining numerous lowered-powered parts. What was once Tanglewood - later renamed Tukwila - is dead. El Reg was the first to discover Tukwila way back in March of 2003. The chip grew out of work done by ex-Alpha processor engineers from DEC and Compaq. It was meant to help Intel catch up with rivals IBM and Sun Microsystems by providing a multicore chip that could crank through software at a quick clip but not consume too much power. Intel, however, has proven averse to taking risks with its Itanium line - or has simply been unable to deal with the beast. Itanium is the only high-end server chip that has yet to reach the dual-core stage. It will do that later this year when Montecito finally arrives. In the meantime, IBM and Sun are looking to pack four or more cores on their upcoming chips and then keep adding cores over time. Should Intel come out with just a dual-core Tukwila part in 2007 - when the product is due - it will make Itanic an even bigger joke. Here's hoping management cuts the engineers a break and lets them show off a four core design. Without such a design, Intel will appear woefully behind its competitors, although it must be getting used to that position where Itanium is concerned. The dual-processor and low voltage version of Tukwila - called Dimona - is still on tap for 2007 as well. It will receive the same tweaks as its higher-end papa. ® Intel's official line is nothing has changed."There have been no changes to our roadmap," an Intel spokeswoman said. "We do not comment on rumours and speculation." Related stories The point of Itanium keeps floating with new chips Who sank Itanic? Intel and IDC at odds over Itanium's future Multicore Itanic: Call me Tukwila Intel's Otellini promises Year of Itanium Analyst fires shot into Itanic's hull Intel's Tanglewood pumped full of DEC Alpha goodness Mister Tanglewood tapped as Intel Fellow Tanglewood to run 10x faster than Madison Intel Tanglewood's first voyage Tanglewood: the next Itanium revealed
Ashlee Vance, 24 Feb 2005
channel

EDS shutting 21 US, European centres

EDS will pull down the shutters at 21 facilities, including four in Europe, by the end of next year as it shifts more work to India. The services giant plans to cut 17 centres in the US and four in Europe as it looks to shave another $1bn off its costs under its ongoing turnaround plan. The labour force reorganization should contribute around $200m to the $1bn target. The reorganization of EDS’s applications operations will leave it with 17 centres in the US, eight in Europe and three in India. According to Reuters, an EDS spokesman said that any job losses related to the reorganization would come through attrition and were already covered by the up to 20,000 staff lay-offs the company has already flagged up. ® Related news Gov.uk delves into EDS finances EDS back in the black MoD imposes 'failure clause' on EDS CSA boss falls on sword over £456m IT system fiasco
Team Register, 24 Feb 2005

Japan.gov weathers DDoS attack

Surfers were intermittently unable to reach the websites of the Japanese prime minister and Cabinet Office this week following a sustained denial of service attack. Japan Today reports the National Police Agency is tracing the source of attacks which left Japanese government websites difficult to reach between Tuesday and Wednesday this week (22 and 23 February). Meanwhile officials are reviewing security. "We had rather significant attacks," Chief Cabinet Secretary Hiroyuki Hosoda told a news conference, AP reports. "We must thoroughly check risk control measures not only at the Prime Minister's Office but other government offices as well." The source and motive of the attacks - which caused no permanent damage - remains unclear. Normal service has been restored but the fact that the latest assaults follow similar strikes in January and August 2004, which also caused little damage, raises concerns that further assaults might follow. Distributed denial of service attacks have become a huge issue for internet businesses over recent months as crackers have taken advantage of networks of compromised PCs to flood sites with useless traffic, leaving them unable to service legitimate requests. Bookmakers, internet payment firms, IT suppliers and government agencies have all become the target of attacks which can prove difficult to thwart. ® Related stories Taiwanese engineer 'assisted Chinese hackers' Brazil 'tops cybercrime league' WorldPay struggles under DDoS attack (again) US credit card firm fights DDoS attack Russian extortion gang faces 15 years Extortionists take out UK gambling site
John Leyden, 24 Feb 2005

Windows licensing - don't swallow it, says MS

Microsoft is as famed for the quality and incisiveness of its marketing as it is for the security of its products, but we're particularly impressed by a recent effort which seems designed to make it just that bit tougher for the Redmond sales teams when they hit the corporate accounts. "Microsoft Windows licensing", says the slogan. "Not quite as obvious until now." And jumping out of the page to the eye of the potential purchaser poised to read all about the joys of Windows licensing, we have a cactus labelled "Do not swallow." Swallow Microsoft Windows licensing? Hell, no, we'd rather eat a cactus. This particular campaign is however impressively direct compared to the baffling thickets it's previously been necessary to navigate in order to figure out some kind of bottom line on Windows licensing. Which is possibly not wholly constructive from Microsoft's point of view. The site points out that from mid-2005 it will be necessary to validate Windows 2000 and XP in order to access product updates, then moves on swiftly to the money side of the genuine Microsoft Windows equation. You can only obtain Windows by two routes - via an OEM licence acquired when you buy a new PC, or by buying the full packaged product. If you have a full packaged product then you can use it forever, but Microsoft volume licence agreements only apply to upgrades, not full packaged product. OEM licences aren't transferrable, "it lives and dies with the original machine", so you lose the licence when you get rid of the machine. Those cutting to the chase at this point will be noting that the whole edifice hinges on practically every PC in the world shipping with an OEM copy of Windows, at which point all of the bargains of Microsoft volume licensing become available to the honest purchaser, but that it all becomes horribly expensive the moment you stop buying, thus falling off the MS carousel. One honest purchaser who received the mailshot version of the campaign deduced: "1 - Buy a load of PCs with OEM licences. 2 - Pay a load of cash to volume license a product you already own. 3 - Receive an OS upgrade (maybe). 4 - Find it grinds your machines to a halt. 5 - Buy new machines with new OEM licences." This particular honest buyer proposes that by the time of his next desktop refresh in four years time, it'll be 90 per cent MS-free. Meanwhile, the satirists are already at work. Oh dear... ®
John Lettice, 24 Feb 2005

Mandrakesoft snags Conectiva

Mandrakesoft, the French Linux distie, is bulking up by buying Brazil-based Linux distributor Conectiva for $2.3m in stock. Conectiva, was founded in 1995 and employs 60 people, mainly in Brazil. The company recorded $2.2m in sales in their latest audited fiscal year. It reached break-even during its latest fiscal half-year, according to a statement. In its latest fiscal year, Mandrakesoft's revenues reached $6.7m for a net income of $1.8m. Mandrakesoft and Conectiva arefounding members of the Linux Core Consortium (LCC), which has recently started development of a common implementation of the Linux Standard Base. The post-merger distro will build its next corporate releases on top of the LCC implementation. ® Related stories Mandrake 'charges' $13k for $132 membership Mandrakesoft exits bankruptcy protection Mandrake supplying Linux on HP desktops
John Leyden, 24 Feb 2005

Spy fears spook IBM-Lenovo deal

For years the Chinese government fretted that the US was using its technology lead to spy on the country - but now the tables are turned. The US government has much deeper concerns about what China can glean from the historic Lenovo-IBM PC deal than recent reports have indicated. Concessions offered by IBM to the US Treasury's Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States were rejected yesterday, Bloomberg reports. The Committee is worried that IBM's North Carolina facility presents opportunities for industrial espionage. Even the IBM customer list - and the US government is a very big customer indeed - could divulge information the US doesn't want China to see. And keeping this list private is one of the concessions apparently made by IBM. (Although it isn't clear how Lenovo can support IBM government staff if it doesn't know who or where they are.) Another concession includes prohibiting Lenovo employees from certain buildings. IBM had been asked not to transfer R&D staff to the facility, but rejected the suggestion. The Committee has until March 14 to file its report to the President. In the late 1990s the PRC was worried that domestic CDMA networks were vulnerable to US political interference, as they use the DoD's GPS satellites to synchronize their base stations. However, a source told your reporter that Chinese government officials didn't object to monitoring of traffic on the ill-fated Iridium network.® Related stories IBM-Lenovo deal to face US govt. probe US hints at IBM-Lenovo deal spy fears IBM's Mr Thinkpad on life before Lenovo IBM hands Lenovo billion-dollar PC loser IBM CEO's memo clarifies PC biz sell-off IBM sells PC biz to China IBM to Power China IBM said to be in PC divison sell-off talks
Andrew Orlowski, 24 Feb 2005
channel

Cisco switch partners see Fibre Channel green

Cisco knows the way to a channel partner's heart - cold, hard cash. The switch maker this week announced a new program to reward partners who can move certain amounts of Cisco's MDS 9000 line of Fibre Channel storage switches. The Cisco Clear Advantage Program is aimed at channel partners in the US and EMEA. These companies selling Cisco's gear can pull in up to a 5 per cent rebate on average if they can show 20 per cent year-on-year sales growth of the MDS 9000 switches in a given quarter. This average rebate figure, however, applies to the US only. Cisco depends on the likes of IBM, HP, Hitachi and EMC to move its Fibre Channel kit. However it's also looking to branch out a bit from these large vendors, and create a stronger channel for its still young gear. Since launching its Fibre Channel products just a couple of years back, Cisco has steadily taken sales from Brocade and McData. This channel program is an attempt to go even further down the food chain and disrupt its rivals once again. "We want to reward partners for investing in building a Cisco storage networking practice," said Keith Zubchevich, a director of storage products at Cisco. "By providing a rebate through the Clear Advantage program, Cisco is helping its channel partners increase their profitability and cover costs associated with becoming specialized in the advanced features and functionality available with the Cisco MDS 9000." Partners will obviously have more incentive to sell Cisco gear with this payout in place. Everyone loves better margins. ® Related stories Big savings on Cisco Press guides EMC admits to iSCSI fleet McDATA gobbles up CNT Data-storage laws fail to drive Euro sales
Ashlee Vance, 24 Feb 2005

Strength through pessimism! Keeping your stuff safe

"We have a lot of optimistic engineers - but not enough pessimistic engineers," reckons David Rosenthal. In the 1980s, Rosenthal designed the NeWS windowing system with James Gosling. In the 1990s he was NVidia's fourth employee, or really the first person the three co-founders hired. But for the past few years Rosenthal has been tackling an issue that's very close to Register readers' hearts - we know from your mail. On Monday we discussed the permanence of digital media - or more accurately, the lack of it in our story, Digital memories: we can forget them for you wholesale!. Why should any of us trust our family albums to digital media such as a web photo service when we can't guarantee it'll be around? In this age of wiki-fiddlers and other careless coders, where the line between marketing hypester and developer has been blurred, the premium that's placed on data integrity seems to be at an all time low. And the lossiest seem to work in "web services". Uh, look out! This is where a glum approach can help, reckons David, who is not at all glum in real life. "Pessimistic coders tend to be systems engineers who have been thinking about building fault tolerant systems for a long time, systems that are more resistant to human error," he told us on a UK visit this week. "It's a bigger problem than just the Web." What Rosenthal has been building, with some success, is an open source peer to peer system that preserves digital content, even when powerful agencies want to see it altered or trashed. It's called LOCKSS - for 'Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe' - and it's already in use by 87 libraries. The project home is at Stanford University Library in northern Californian. It's only addressing one of the problems of digital media - others include obsolescence and proprietary file formats, for example, but it's one that few people look at. And it's a very important problem to fix. Lock up your datum Digital formats, particularly web with publishing, are much worse than paper when it comes to preserving content for current and future users, and computers make it much easier to rewrite history, Rosenthal says. "In 1984 Winston Smith's job was updating the only copy of history," he reminds us. "There's a whole community of librarians who were desperate for this tool, we discovered," he says. It's a P2P system in which multiple copies are made and the member nodes audit each other, and repair any damage. LOCKSS is both a web cache and a web crawler; the cache never gets flushed and the crawler is permanently scavenging. "Good quality backup is difficult and expensive to do - and archive quality backup is really expensive and difficult to do", he says. Many smaller libraries find getting system administration skills difficult and expensive, so the team turned LOCKSS into a turnkey product that boots off a BSD CD. It's really a network appliance now, he says. Initially Rosenthal tried to interest potential users in one of the experimental "giant internet file systems" such as NEC's Intermemory, now OpenStore. "We tried to sell them the idea of this big file system where no one knows where the data is - but the librarians didn't buy this story!" Anyone can use the source code, but the team wants the system to be used by many more medium sized libraries before embarking on a rewrite of the LOCKSS' P2P protocols. Did he envisage a time when community groups would be able to use the software? Rosenthal said he would expect it to be several years before it filtered down to the DIY level. For now, he's seen an enthusiastic adoption by the humanities community, and built on early grant sponsorship from the National Science Foundation. LOCKSS is targeted at a specific community of people who take data integrity very seriously indeed. But it also sets a standard to which we must hold these new, highly emergent web services - before they lose all our valuable stuff. Backups aren't self-organizing. Find out more about LOCKSS excellent work here. ® Related stories Digital memories: we can forget them for you wholesale! Google - the only archive we'll ever need? Archive.org suffers Fahrenheit 911 memory loss How key Microsoft legal emails 'autodestruct' Our kids deserve better than a Google future German national library busts copy protection
Andrew Orlowski, 24 Feb 2005