8th > September > 2004 Archive

Intel admits Itanium pains, plots server future

IDF Fall '04IDF Fall '04 Intel today filled in a large chunk of its server processor roadmap, laying out a plan that brings the company up-to-speed with rivals . . . eventually. Intel's new server processor chief Abhi Talwalkar did his best here at the Intel Developer forum to defend the still struggling Itanium processor and to tout the successful Xeon line of chips. In so doing, Talwalkar pledged to advance Itanium in a way that will help Intel-based boxes match high-end servers from the likes of IBM and Sun Microsystems through sophisticated tools such as partitioning and management software. In addition, the exec announced new multicore Xeon processors that will help Intel compete against IBM, Sun and AMD. On the Itanium front, Intel plans to debut a number of new technologies in the dual-core Montecito chip due out next year. This processor will ship with Intel's Pellston memory error correcting technology and its Foxton power management tools. In addition, Intel's Silvervale partitioning technology will appear first in Montecito. Silvervale will help Intel customers develop hardware-based partitioning in their servers. All of the major Unix vendors currently ship high-end partitioning tools for running numerous applications on a single system. HP currently offers impressive partitioning technology via HP-UX on Itanium servers, but the Intel "ecosystem" as a whole is behind the RISC world on this front, as neither Windows or Linux can match the most popular versions of Unix in this area. Intel expects Silvervale to help software makers such as VMware make better code for the Windows and Linux crowd, although Unix-like tools will certainly take years to develop. Intel plans to follow Montecito with a low voltage version of the chip called Millington. Near the 2006 timeframe, Intel will ship a follow on to Montecito code-named Montvale and follow that with a low voltage chip. In 2007, Intel is then expected to release the multicore Tukwila chip, first revealed here, and its low power counterpart Dimona. Intel's continued faith in Itanic is nothing short of remarkable. The processor, however, has started to take a toll on Talwalkar. "Are we meeting the goals we had for this year? Not to the aggressive levels we set," Talwalkar said during a question and answer session with reporters at IDF. Itanium is also failing to meet the aggressive levels set by analyst firm IDC. Through the first half of 2004, Itanium shipments have come in $13.4bn shy of IDC's onetime $14bn forecast. When a reporter cited these figures to describe Itanium as a "failure," Talwalkar shrugged off the suggestion that sales have been slow. He pointed to a number of servers behind him on stage, saying that companies such as Hitachi, Unisys, Fujitsu and NEC are keeping the Itanium ecosystem alive and well by complementing Itanic leader HP. In the second quarter, Hitachi shipped 15 Itanium servers, Unisys moved 11, Fujitsu shipped 5 and NEC moved 38, according to Gartner. HP sold 4,789 of the grand total of 5,665 boxes. We couldn't help but wonder if the Fujitsu box on stage was one of the five it sold in the quarter. Industry standard? Don't think so. Intel's Xeon strategy appears far more rational than its Itanium plans. One of the most intriguing parts of the Xeon roadmap was confirmed for the first time today as Intel revealed Whitefield - a product discovered by The Register in May. Talkwar did little more than admit Whitefield's existence, but sources have revealed this chip will combine numerous mobile processor cores, making it similar to the multicore processors being described most prominently by Sun. Intel did confirm that most of the work done on Whitefield occurred in India - a first for the company. Intel also described a chip code-named Irwindale for two-processor servers and workstations. This product will be the follow on to today's 3.6GHz x86-64-bit Xeons, shipping with a faster clock rate and a 2MB cache. For multiprocessor servers, Intel next year plans to ship Cranford and Potomac. The chips will have different cache sizes and other attributes and will be paired with the Twin Castle chipset. Later, Intel plans to release the Tulsa follow on. Intel has still yet to reveal the replacement for Jayhawk in the dual-processor server market. Intel is facing more competition than ever before on the server front from AMD and its Opteron chip, making a smooth Xeon roadmap crucial. It's somewhat frustrating to see Intel tout dual and multicore chips now after having dismissed the technology as child's play back when Sun was hyping it. Sun, to be sure, needed something to brag about and did so too early, but Intel now appears as a laggard to world+dog. It has been behind on 64-bit extensions, dual cores, multicore products, things like partitioning technology and has no answer for AMD's Hypertransport. This all conjures up the feeling that Intel became far too focused on boosting GHz for single core chips when it should have been looking ahead to anticipate a changing market. Intel, luckily, has the resources and reputation needed to offset challenges from below. The tech giant, however, certainly doesn't look as savvy and on the ball as it used to. ® Related stories Intel plans for digital planet Intel plans for digital planet Beastly Itanium delayed until Q4
Ashlee Vance, 08 Sep 2004

Intel goes public with WiMAX plans

IDF Fall '04IDF Fall '04 Intel has released more information about its plans for Rosedale, its WiMAX broadband wireless chip, suggesting that the technology could be available for smart phone handsets by 2007. The company also said that it has started sampling Rosedale to its key customers. Today, Intel president Paul Otellini told delegates at the Intel Developers Forum in San Francisco that WiMAX would be to DSL and cable what cellular networks were to fixed line telephones, calling it a "disruptive, cheaper alternative". Pricing is one of the biggest inhibitors to broadband wireless deployment, according to Scott Robinson, manager of Intel's broadband wireless group. Current client equipment costs between $350-$500, but Robinson says that with Rosedale, Intel is working on reducing that to a "sub-$200" price bracket. Rosedale, Intel says modestly, is likely to be the first system on a chip to ship that supports the newly ratified 802.16-2004 standard. WiMAX (802.16) is designed to cover a range of around 30 miles and will be capable of transferring data at 75Mbps. Intel said its customers are working on developing products around the technology, and that it will integrate it into notebook chipsets in 2006, and the smart phone chipsets in 2007. Widespread deployment of the base stations is slated to begin next year. ® Related stories Fujitsu preps 'early 2005' single-chip WiMAX part Ericsson ditches Bluetooth WiMAX approaches tipping point with new specs and carrier support
Lucy Sherriff, 08 Sep 2004

The digital home cometh, says Intel

IDF Fall '04IDF Fall '04 The digital home will be big news in 2005, Intel said today at IDF, backing up similar predictions made in 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2003. This year the big chip firm says that gaming and entertainment will be the two areas to really make an impact with consumers. Focus groups identified five other areas where technology would be a real benefit to them: communication, home management, work, education and health. According to Mike Trainor, chief mobile technology evangelist for Intel’s Mobile Platforms Group, this is not yet another blue-sky scenario where consumers come home to a Jetsons-style automated house, but a more practical application of technology. "We're talking about appliances that monitor themselves and tell you when they are about to break, and monitoring power and water usage so that you can keep an eye on your bills," he said. Consumers were also very keen on being able to organise "virtual gatherings" with family, and, in particular, said that they wanted to be able to record coversations for posterity, according to Trainor. Something to bear in mind when calling your spouse after one too many beers, perhaps. The technologist argues that Intel's role in this is to create the "silicon building blocks" that will make embarrassing phone calls and appliance monitoring possible. Trainor said that it was important that the consumer experience was consistent across devices and applications, so standards were a vital part of the story. "Driving industry standards will go a long way to making sure this technology is reliable and ubiquitous," he said. Making the technology simple to use, however, is a challenge for the rest of the industry. Intel's market research revealed that there are three requirements the technology must meet before consumers buy in in a big way. The kit needs to be simple, reliable, and widely used. After all, no one wants to be the only geek on the block. Andy Crump, director of digital home technology solutions architecture and initiatives at Intel, said the company has just published new guidelines for developers working on product design: Network Media Product requirements. Crump also chairs the Digital Living Network Association's standards committee, and says that the two sets of standards are complementary. The new NMPR document from Intel builds on the DLNA guidelines to cover standards for remotely controlling devices and handling the delivery of premium content. ® Related stories Cyber appliances, deadly mobiles and free beer Cisco retails networked hotel vision More red ink spills all over online college music scene
Lucy Sherriff, 08 Sep 2004

Sun to bring Opteron, Linux to telcos

Sun Microsystems is most certainly adjusting to changing times. The company announced today that it will expand its line of telco-focused servers beyond just UltraSPARC processor-based gear to include systems running on AMD's Opteron processor and a carrier-grade Linux operating system. Sun's Netra systems, hardened to meet telcos' requirements, were some of its best sellers, during the boom. With Solaris and SPARC on its side, Sun was able to sell the boxes at a premium and push forward a high margin business. But when boom turned to bust, Sun's massive telco business dried up, and the company has since been looking to revive sales and have the telecommunications sector come back. Hoping to capitalize on a mild recovery in the telco market, Sun will ship a new family of Netra systems called the AdvancedTCA line. These boxes obviously adhere to the new Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture (ATCA) specification for carrier-grade blade servers. Sun will ship both Solaris on UltraSparc and Linux on Opteron systems in this line, starting next year. In addition, Sun has started shipping an AC verison of its Netra 440 server. The DC version of this product shipped in June. The NEBS certified box starts at $13,995. It's 40 percent cheaper than a comparable Itanium-based box from HP, according to Sun. ® Related stories Server makers shift more boxes than cash in Q2 Sun adds a little more juice to v1280 Sun speeds low-end with UltraSparc, AMD kit
Ashlee Vance, 08 Sep 2004

Apple fans apathetic about apathy

LettersLetters Our story last week on lazy Apple users being responsible for screwing themselves out of the college music downloading scene did little to inspire or anger the Mac faithful. In fact, we hardly received any flames - something unheard of in an era full of Jobsian self-hating angst. That said, the best of the worst are printed here. As a Mac user, I understand exactly where you are coming from. At first, I wrote you this: -- start here-- However, as a recent graduate I can say that I probably wouldn't care very much either. I suppose the $20 sucks in principle, but if the parents are footing the bill then I doubt the students care. After all, that's only about 2 hours of work study. -- end here -- but now that I think about it, it does suck. not because of the service, which I wouldn't want anyway, but the fact that the university would probably have to recommend buying a PC solely because it's hooked up with Napster. And that I do have a serious problem with. Thanks for the good read. Jon Haddad This is the first I've heard of the inequities in these deals. Usually the articles are PR pieces about how great the service is for the students. Once awareness is generated I'm sure you'll hear more. the only whining I've heard from these University experiments is the Duke students that didn't get iPods. That was pretty widely reported. Martin Cinzar kinda weak, I support your argument, but still a weak piece. John Andow Ashlee, I think you're confusing college students with "Apple faithful". Perhaps the iPod-using college students don't really represent the core of Apple's faithful user base. I'm also not really sure why the supposed apathy of Mac zealots in this case is somehow not shocking, particularly given your statement that Apple users "whine" about so many other things. It's also weird that you place the blame on the students rather than on the clueless administration officials who went with Napster rather than with iTunes, or on Apple for not clinching the deal with Cornell. Overall, this piece left me scratching my head. Erik Schmidt Just saw your Ruckus article. Despite Mr. Galper's contention, when he performed a focus group at my school there was pretty much unanimous consensus that the ability to dowload music to portable players was a requirement of us implementing such a service. With regard to questions about working with the Mac platform, Ruckus (and most of the other services) offers content as DRMed Windows Media files. It's a lot harder to do things with Windows Media on the Mac, and Microsoft isn't doing much to remedy the gap. Not that there was much interest in the service anyway, judging by the focus group I participated in. Students want to be able to use the music service they choose, pay a fair market price, and own what they buy. The RIAA is making that nearly impossible, and it is much too early for schools to start making blanket agreements for one brand over another on behalf of their students. The market simply isn't there yet. And my school will not be implementing Ruckus or any other service anytime soon -- we have more important things to do at college then worry about the concerns of an industry that refuses to deliver products to consumers in a reasonable way and at a fair price. Danny Silverman I understand that everyone is entitled to his or her opinion, but I have to beg to differ with yours. For starters, once the deals were announced, what can Apple's "faithful" really do to reverse the outcome? Nothing. The schools have been silently coerced into these agreements and contracts with the likes of Napster. Coming from a University environment, I am sure that these ivy league schools were ill-advised, not made aware of alternative solutions, or just plain hoodwinked into these deals. Also, there were other universities who outright turned down what Napster was proposing because they saw to the heart of the matter - that Napster was trying to capitalize on the technological ignorance of the decision makers by trying to offer a "solution" to the problem of peer to peer file sharing on campuses. Lastly, how has the "faithful's" so-called silence become an issue now? Those deals are old news. Currently, Florida State University has struck a deal with Apple to make FSU an iTunes school. The particulars of the deal have yet to come out, but it does seem promising. Travel a bit to the north of FSU to Duke University and see that all incoming freshman are getting iPods. So, to me, it seems that Cornell was tricked into a deal with Napster that will be a joke when Napster fails. No need to go into great detail as to why I think that will happen but I will leave it at this. How can a company survive when it spends more than it brings in. You do the math. Respectfully, Jarvis A. Addison A computing profession using both Macintosh and PC compatible computers. Blah blah blah... Is it that slow a week on the Apple front that this is the best attack you guys can come up with? Why not instead trash the new iMac's good looks or moan about its high price? Isn't Apple is going out of business again? You and the Register can do better, so try, try again. -Alex Reynolds Frankly, I am more concerned about yet another foray by universities into the business world. I mean are our educational institutions really suppose to be getting into bed with music distributors? I am more upset about the idea that people are getting to billed for music at all when they go to college. The whole is idea is absurd and if you understood what was really happening on these campuses you would that the administrators of higher education are seriously corrupt. Here is one very small example: the governing board and president of Eastern Michigan University were just busted building themselves a $10 million party house with student tuition money. http://www.wxyz.com/wxyz/ys_investigations/article/0,2132,WXYZ_15949_3031785,00.html http://www.ypsilanticourier.com/2003/homepage/03121801.htm My questions is who got bribed by Napster giving at Cornell. It sound like the some students may be getting "real-world" education. Macintosh people having been dealing living in a Window world for a long time. Things like what your are describing are largely expected. Again, I think the real debate is over what our universities are getting into and specifically, serous white collar crime in the administrations as people exploit their positions to make money. John Anderson Currently my daughter attends Brandeis, a Mac friendly school. Had she selected such a school, I'd be screaming. Such a school means any school selecting any music service at all. The lack of reaction by most college students is not surprising at all. For the most part college students don't give a damn about anything except partying. Those that do care are usually in their final years aiming towards getting out or facing the awful burden of paying off their loans. I don't know what makes you think $20 is such a big deal when that just about pays for a school bumper sticker these days. Despite these realities, I think you miss the point. If anyone should be screaming about freedom of choice, it should be Apple. I wonder if a class action lawsuit could be filed as a large group is being excluded from a service they will be required to pay for without having to pay a tax of some sort: at Duke University it is the Apple tax, at Napster schools it is the Wintel tax. Jerry Appel Not all Mac fans are apathetic. I have been a huge fan of Apple since the late 80's. Except that I hate iPods, the iTunes Music Store, and the disgusting acceptance of corporate regulation of personal freedoms. If my current provider of "higher education" ever adopted this bastard RIAA demon-spawned craptwist of a once revolutionary idea (Napster), I would NOT use the service even if it was available to mac users, and REFUSE to pay the fee even if it meant transferring to another school. I wish Apple would just focus on making cool computers and software and give up this music business crap although I know its not going to happen because the iPod is profitable for them. OK end of rant I think your articles here at The Register are pretty good even this one because its mostly true. Deakson So Apple are using their dominent market position to try and put its competitors out of business - Isn't that role reserved for Microsoft? Anti-competative, Cross subsidising, Market stifling - Looks like Apple has grown up! Steve Whitley
Ashlee Vance, 08 Sep 2004

California sues Diebold over e-voting snafu

BriefBrief The attorney general of California is joining a case to sue electronic ballot box maker Diebold. Its machines were used in the state to count votes during the March primary election. The attorney general initially considered criminal charges against the company for installing uncertified software on some machines which "jeopardized" the election result. About 6,000 people had to use back-up paper ballots because of problems with the machines. More than half the polling stations in San Diego County could not open on time because of problems with Diebold equipment. The case asks for the return of the $12m the state spent on the touchscreen voting machines. ® Related stories California green lights e-voting E-voting terminals: gambling with data? E-voting promises US election tragicomedy
John Oates, 08 Sep 2004

MS smart phones gain in-car nav kit

Navigation software specialist ALK will allow Windows Mobile-based smart phones to be used as in-car map-readers later this month, the company said today. And ALK held out the prospect that it may also support the more popular Symbian smart phone platform next year. CoPilot Live for mobile phones is essentially a version of ALK's PocketPC navigation software, shoehorned onto a handset. Like CoPilot Live 5, the smart phone edition provides both 2D and 3D route-maps with spoken directions for in-motion navigation. The software's maps - provided by Navteq - are bang up to date, ALK claimed, and for British drivers included the location of speed cameras and London's congestion charge zone, providing warnings on their approach and the ability to determine routes that bypass them. The code can make full use of the handset's GPRS connectivity to receive traffic incident data and to send out up-to-the-minute location information. The latter is pitched primarily at fleet managers, but ALK stressed the consumer applications, such as text messages to inform relatives, colleagues etc. that you'll be late. CoPilot Live will ship in a couple of weeks' time, ALK said, through its network of resellers as standalone software (from £150) or with the company's own Bluetooth-enabled GPS receiver (from £299). ALK representatives said the company was currently approaching both mobile phone retailers and network providers to take the kit on. The navigation software and maps ship on a 128MB Mini SD card with an SD card adaptor, freeing users from the need to sync up the handset with a PC. If you want to use the Bluetooth receiver, you'll need a Bluetooth-equipped handset. Support for Symbian-based smart phones is in the works, we understand, but its release is some way off - well into 2005. ® Related stories Mio launches MS smartphone in UK Motorola delays MPx220 MS smart phone Symbian revenues, device sales rise Garmin preps mid-range integrated GPS PDA Navman preps PocketPC with GPS PDA makers unveil Wi-Fi, GPRS PDAs Related reviews Medion MDPPC250 PocketPC GPS Bundle Evesham integrated GPS PocketPC Navman GPS 4400 Bluetooth navigator
Tony Smith, 08 Sep 2004

Philips' athletic MP3 player hits the track

Philips and Nike yesterday introduced the Mp3Run - a gadget they believe is the only product on the market that combines music and athletic performance monitoring. The unveiling was one of the few innovations at the Philips products show in the Factory Convention Centre in Amsterdam, which continues today. Runners strap the Mp3Run to their arm and a Bluetooth-enabled speed sensor to their shoe. The sensor continuously collects data such as speed and distance covered and the Mp3Run's display shows a summary of the performance and delivers an audible summary via the headphones. Up to 200 workouts can be stored in the player’s memory, and an unlimited number on a PC. If the runner wants an update during the run, he simply reaches over and presses the button. With 256MB of storage capacity, the Mp3Run can save up to 125 WMA tracks or 60 MP3 tracks. The player also has a built-in FM radio function with 10 presets and twelve hours' playtime. Philips also launched a new Go Gear Wearable Camcorder, which combines a MPEG4 camcorder, 2 megapixel camera and a Mp3 audio player in one, and showed a new model of its Streamium TV, a 23-inch LCD TV that is able to wirelessly access video, music, photos and multimedia content stored on a PC. ® Related stories Introducing the Kalashnikov MP3 player Consumers go crazy for MP3 players Napster gives away MP3 players
Jan Libbenga, 08 Sep 2004

Watchdog mauls internet directory for bogus invoices

A London company has coughed to using dodgy sales tactics to try and get firms to sign up to its internet business directory by misleading businesses to think they owed money. London-based GC Logic Ltd admitted sending out a letter and invoice to firms asking for £49 (inc VAT) to be included in its internetnoticeboard.com business directory. GC Logic said the payment was due because the "initial free trial period of 30 days has now elapsed". But a company in Cheshire complained because it had no recollection of subscribing to the directory in the first place. When challenged by the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), GC Logic admitted that those receiving the mailshot had not subscribed to a free trial. The company - which bought a database of business names and addresses from a company in India - also admitted that it had received a stack of complaints about the mailshot. GC Logic "acknowledged that [it] had taken the wrong approach", but explained that it was a new company trying to make the most from its "minimal budget". In its adjudication, the ASA said: "[GC Logic] said they accepted full responsibility for the complaints received and the incorrect data used and said no further marketing activities would take place using the database in question." Even so, the ad watchdog ruled that the "mailing postured as an invoice and concluded that the mailing misleadingly implied the recipients owed money". If GC Logic continues to send out the misleading mailings, and the ASA receives further complaints, then the matter can be forwarded to the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) to investigate. ® Related stories Email chancer claims copyright on @ OFT fingers Bristol man over misleading data protection ad Spanish invoice scam targets UK Alert over invoices from 'Domain Registry Services' Watch out for the bogus invoice man
Tim Richardson, 08 Sep 2004

Nokia slims down 'the brick'

Nokia is launching a slimmed-down version of its flagship Communicator. The Nokia 9300 will go on sale worldwide sometime in early 2005, priced at between $785 and $845. It weighs in at less than six ounces (170 grams), compared with 8.6 ounces for the most recent Communicator, the 9500. The 9300 lacks the 9500's digital camera and Wi-Fi chipset - lending to the machine's smaller battery - but it is also noticeably slimmer than its predecessor. Like all previous Communicators, the 9300 has a traditional "candy bar" shape and can be opened along its side to reveal a larger LCD screen and QWERTY keyboard. The new handset is the latest in the phone maker's eight-year-old line of Communicator smart phones, devices that come with an array of advanced features allowing them to double as mini-laptops. The 9300 comes with advanced personal organiser features, as well as support for RIM's (Blackberry) wireless email software. Other features include in-built office applications supporting documents, spreadsheets, presentations, and a PDF viewer. The handset works on most global mobile standards, has an MP3 and multimedia player, and supports Java for new application and games downloads. The 9300 also has an 80MB storage capacity, which is expandable to 2GB. Still more attributes of the Symbian-based GSM/GPRS phone include an assortment of e-security protocols - including anti-virus software - support for HTML/XHTML web browsing and Bluetooth, infrared and USB connectivity. According to pundits the 9300, is an attempt by the firm to broaden the appeal of the Communicator, which has a loyal following among a small group of technophiles. Like early Motorola mobiles from the late 1980s and early 1990s, current versions of the Communicator have been dubbed "the brick" by those turned off by the devices' size. Niklas Savander, senior vice president of Nokia's business device unit, said: "The Nokia 9300 will appeal to a wide range of professionals who want powerful functionality from a data-enabled device without compromising the look, comfort, simplicity and usability of a standard mobile phone. We believe the Nokia 9300 strikes that balance in one stylish smartphone, without sacrificing the combined functionality that many people require but until now could only get from carrying multiple products." Nokia is facing mounting pressure from rivals which have recently moved deeper into smart phone territory. Motorola, Microsoft, PalmOne, Sony Ericsson and others have all hitched their carts to the smart phone market, which as yet remains unproven, despite claims of 170 million unit shipments annually by 2009. Nokia is the top vendor in the sector, shipping some two million smart phones in the second quarter of 2004 and taking 33.2 per cent of the market, according to research firm Canalys. Copyright © 2004, ENN Related stories Nokia calls up RIM, again Nokia unveils phones, promises Wi-Fi Nokia 6820 messaging phone Nokia's new Communicator - who needs it? Nokia and IBM update the Communicator with Wi-Fi Nokia to unwrap new Communicator
ElectricNews.net, 08 Sep 2004

Qinetiq bags robot maker

QinetiQ, the privatised government defence labs, is buying US defence firm Foster-Miller for £91.8m($163m). The two firms have been working together on a bomb disposal robot. QinetiQ has been looking closely at around 60 firms after considering 1,000 US targets for acquistion, according to the FT. Foster-Miller is its first US buy. The firm is expected to make more US acquisitions to improve access to the world's largest military market. QinetiQ made sales of $40m in the US last year. Plans for a share float have been put back at least a year while the firm increases its US presence. Dr David Anderson, president and CEO of QinetiQ's US subsidiary, said: "Strategically, the acquisition of Foster-Miller will be key to achieving QinetiQ’s goal of growing our US business significantly. Foster-Miller is a remarkable fit with QinetiQ, both technologically and culturally." Dr William Ribich, president and CEO of Foster-Miller, also welcomed the deal: "The skill sets of our two companies are uniquely complementary.This is a partnership where the whole really will be greater than the sum of its parts. Separately, we are leaders in a number of technologies. Together, we can be world-beating." Foster-Miller will continue to trade under its own name, but as a subsidiary of QinetiQ North America. It is the world's largest supplier of add-on armour for military transport planes and its TALON robots have carried out 10,000 bomb disposal missions in Iraq. ® Related stories To talk or not to talk - that is the question Firm trials cancer-zapping nanobots Eurofighter at risk of 'catastrophic failure'
John Oates, 08 Sep 2004

Lexmark recalls 40,000 laser printers

Lexmark has asked buyers to return a range of laser printer models after "internal reliability testing" uncovered a potential electric shock hazard. According to the company, which reported the recall in co-operation with the US Consumer Product Safety Commission, no user has been affected by the problem - or, rather, no one has yet complained about it. And Lexmark is adamant that the issue only emerged in a single machine that had undergone the equivalent of "several years of normal usage". The risk appears only evident on printers connected to an unearthed power supply. To users who have such a power supply, Lexmark said they should "not open the covers, not turn off the printer, not touch the back of the printer, and not touch anything else connected to the printer prior to unplugging it". Still, that hasn't stopped it recalling all E232, E232t, E330, E332, E332n and E332tn lasers sold in the US through 20 August 2004. The printers were sold not only under the Lexmark brand, but as IBM and Dell printers too, according to a Forbes.com report. Further details here. Lexmark's recall follows last week's call by IBM for the return of a number of notebook power adaptors, and Apple's recent recall of 15in PowerBook G4 batteries. ® Related stories IBM recalls 500,000 melting notebook adapters Apple recalls 15in PowerBook batteries Dell issues adaptor electric shock warning HP recalls notebook RAM Intel recalls faulty Grantsdale chipsets Kyocera recalls exploding PalmOS phone battery IBM raises smoke alarm over 63,000 monitors IBM recalls 117,000 dusty old monitors Sony recalls 18,000 Vaios Compaq recalls defective iPAQ SD memory card
Tony Smith, 08 Sep 2004

RIM 7100t to 'charm' mobile phone fans

UpdateUpdate Research in Motion will ship its much-anticipated phone-format Blackberry handset, the 7100t, in the first week of October, the company will announce later today. The device, codenamed 'Charm', looks more like a smart phone handset than previous Blackberries and will be pitched at mass-market consumers in a bid to win them over to RIM's e-mail and PIM system. The most obvious change RIM has made with the new handset is the replacement of older Blackberries' QWERTY keypads with a standard mobile phone-style numeric pad, each with three alpha characters or symbols. Essentially, RIM is attempting to appeal to the SMS generation. While the handset is less wide than other Blackberries, the 7100t provides the same applications as those machines, although they have been upgraded for the new device. It is also sports a more consumer-friendly dark-grey and light-grey colour scheme, and a phone-like hi-res colour LCD screen. The 7100t is expected to be made available exclusively through T-Mobile USA, according to a Reuters report, for $200 plus a $60 monthly fee, which includes 1000 minutes' talk time and unlimited data and messaging. The handsedt includes instant messaging functionality, along with built-in Bluetooth. A quad-band device, the phone operates on 850/900/1800/1900MHz GSM/GPRS wireless networks in North America, Europe and Asia Pacific. UK and European launches will take place when RIM has signed up appropriate network partners. ® Related stories Nokia calls up RIM, again Nokia slims down 'the brick' Siemens touts Blackberry-based business phone Mac OS X gets Blackberry sync support Sony Ericsson debuts keyboard smart phone Final appeal in RIM's US Blackberry battle RIM makes mobile gains while Palm, Sony and Dell falter Good Technology settles with Lawsuits in Motion
Tony Smith, 08 Sep 2004

Having kids makes you thick: official

Researchers at Indiana University’s Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction have proved what most of us suspected all along - that having children makes you thick. That, at least, is the shock claim published in today's edition of UK tabloid the Sun, which reports how the Indiana team "checked the IQs of couples who were planning to start families, then repeated the tests six months after their first child was born". Sensationally, it found the intelligence levels of both mums and dads "dropped significantly" and that "they particularly lost the power to think objectively". Lead boffin Dr Hosung Lee concluded: “It explains why parents think their kid is the smartest in class or the best athlete, even if that child is as dumb as a box of rocks or needs a calendar to time a 100-yard sprint. People who before were intelligent and open-minded turn into raving lunatics who want to blame a teacher or sports coach every time their mediocre child fails.” Dr Lee's delicious comments are bound to outrage loving parents who are convinced that they are still as clever as a sackful of Einsteins - despite having produced a litter of nippers - but they are requested to check out the Hoosier Gazette, the Kinsey Institute's website and fark.com's comments on the matter before venting their spleen via email. Our conclusions? Well, having kids may or may not hit you in the grey matter department, but writing for the UK tabloids causes demonstrable enlargement of the gullibility gland, leading to complete collapse of research faculties. Nasty. As for the Indiana University program, the Hoosier Gazette reports that "the Kinsey Institute will continue to test the couples participating in the study to determine if the loss of intelligence is reversible once children grow up and leave the nest and if parents who continue having children lose even more intelligence." ® Related stories Sheep pine for absent friends: official Net porn good for you: official Universe very big: official
Lester Haines, 08 Sep 2004

Grid computing gets EC backing

The European Commission is putting €52m (£35m) into 12 projects which aim to get the benefits of Grid computing out of computer labs and into industry and business. Business competitiveness will increase if the technology becomes more widely available, the EC says. Four projects will receive €9m each. These are: Simdat, which is developing Grid applications for automotive, aerospace and pharmaceutical industries; Nextgrid, which is looking at Grid architecture,;Akogrimo, which is working on mobile technologies and Internet Protocol version 6 ;and Coregrid, which is helping different research centres work together. Eight smaller projects are getting the rest of the money. Olli Rehn, enterprise and information society commissioner, said: “These projects will accelerate Europe’s drive to turn its substantial Grid research investment into tangible economic benefits. Greater use of Grid tools is key for mobilising Europe’s scientific and technological capital to deliver greater competitiveness and better products.” More information on Grid computing here. ® Related stories Brits to demo world's largest computing grid Penguins come to Wimbledon European healthcare 'online by 2008'
John Oates, 08 Sep 2004

Hundreds of Bulldog users without broadband - again

Bulldog - voted the "Best Consumer Broadband ISP" at this year's UK internet awards - has apologised to customers once again, after "a few hundred" were left without Net access yesterday. Bulldog is engaged in a "quest to get more capacity on our network", according to a spokesman. Unfortunately for some users, this has meant their service going down, with little help or support from the ISP. One punter got so fed up yesterday he even visited Bulldog's offices in person to try and find out what was going on, according to a posting on ADSLGuide's message board. Another told us: "Seems hundreds of customers of Bulldog across the country have been without service since the small hours of [yesterday] morning. Predictably, getting through to customer services and technical support is a joke. "For me personally, this is the second serious outage in the space of a month. I have written to the Bulldog chief executive to complain; at this time I have not yet received a reply." In a statement, the ISP, which is now owned by Cable & Wireless, said: "Bulldog would like to apologise to customers affected by service issues yesterday. "Problems were encountered on several BT DataStream exchanges used by Bulldog to provide broadband services. This affected a few hundred end users. Part of the issue was a consequence of recent significant capacity additions to the network.  "This was unfortunately compounded by an IPstream failure in BT's network at Ilford which affected other Bulldog users and hence caused heavy loading of the support lines. "The Bulldog technical support team worked closely with BT to resolve the problems and return customers to normal service. Customers should now be experiencing improved network performance enabled by the recent enhancements." Anyhow, users probably need to brace themselves for further disruption as Bulldog works on the "long term sustainability of its network". A week ago as many as one in ten of Bulldog's punters suffered technical problems, as Bulldog bungled the migration of customers onto a new server. ® Related stories Botched migration hits Bulldog users Bulldog targets SMEs with unbundled SDSL C&W buys Bulldog
Tim Richardson, 08 Sep 2004
channel

Intel nabs Samsung branding chief

Intel yesterday confirmed reports that it has poached Samsung's branding chief, Eric B Kim, to run its sales and marketing operation. Samsung said earlier this week that it would not be renewing Kim's contract when it comes up for renewal next month. Industry sources suggested Kim, 50, had been approached by Intel and would be joining the chip giant. And that's indeed what will happen. Kim will join Intel on 15 November and take over the company's "global branding, advertising, co-operative marketing, and market research, as well as Internet and channel marketing programs". Pending approval by Intel's board of directors, Kim will be elected to a corporate VP position, the company added. Kim is widely held to have created Samsung as a global consumer brand, particularly through its digital convergence strategy. Intel may well be hoping he'll pull off a similar trick to drive its own push to broaden PC usage beyond desktops, notebooks and servers and into more consumer electronics-style roles. ® Related stories The digital home cometh, says Intel Intel plans for digital planet Intel goes public with WiMAX plans Intel admits Itanium pains, plots server future Beastly Itanium delayed until Q4 Intel disappoints investors with lowered Q3 outlook
Tony Smith, 08 Sep 2004
channel

Dixons upbeat on trading

Dixons Stores Group sales for the 18 weeks to 4 September 2004 were eight per cent up on the same period last year and five per cent up on a like-for-like basis. UK sales were up nine per cent or seven per cent like-for-like. Currys and PC World both performed well. But gross margin at the the UK's biggest electrical retailer, fell 0.4 per cent because of more business-to-business sales and "lower credit commissions". International sales were up 13 per cent, but were flat on a like-for-like basis. The firm operates in the Czech Republic, France, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Spain and the Nordic countries. John Clare, chief executive, gave the trading update at the firm's annual general meeting. He said the firm is well placed for a "year of progress". Dixons sales performance showed "encouraging signs of recovery from last year's levels, and The Link continues to perform well in a growing market" .The company announced in April it was closing 106 under-performing stores. ® Related stories Dixons seeks 1,000 new recruits Retailers bans Manhunt after murder link claim Dixons profits up Dixons shutters 106 stores
John Oates, 08 Sep 2004

Tiscali disses Pipex broadband claims

Pipex says it is now the fourth largest xDSL provider in the UK with more than 170,000 broadband punters. The announcement that it had leapfrogged Tiscali into fourth slot (its now behind AOL UK, Wanadoo UK and BT) came today as the company announced that turnover had increased markedly over the last year on the back of increased take-up of broadband throughout the UK. However, Pipex's claim is based on an analyst's report that doesn't class high-speed services below 512k as "broadband". A spokeswoman for Tiscali UK, which has more than 300,000 "broadband" users, dismissed Pipex's new claim. "Ofcom counts anything from 128k upwards as broadband. We'll stick with that," she said. While the debate concerning a definition for broadband continues to divide the industry and confuse punters, Pipex announced that turnover for the first six months of the year jumped to £43.6m from £11.1m last year, while it trimmed H1 pre-tax loss to £1.9m from £3.8m. Broadband numbers, domain name registrations and shared-hosting customers are "now growing strongly" buoyed by the recent acquisitions of ISP Nildram and Web host outfit Host Europe. Broadband now accounts for 42 per cent of Pipex's revenues, compared to 10 per cent at this stage last year. Hosting and domain names contributed 26 per cent of turnover, up from eight per cent, while revenues from leased lines fell from 61 per cent to just 15 per cent this year. Said Pipex chief exec Mike Read: "In the period we have seen increased growth in broadband customer numbers, domain name registrations and shared-hosting customers. Following the period end, the addition of Nildram brought a significant number of SME business broadband customers. "With these areas now growing strongly, over the next 12 months the Company will be focusing on the integration of the business processes and systems which have passed into Pipex ownership through acquisitions. It is expected that this integration will lead to further economic benefits and improved customer service." Pipex - which employs 650 staff - plans to continue streamlining its business following recent acquisitions, but said that it has no plans to axe jobs. The "streamlining" will occur thanks to the integration of back office systems, the company said. ® Related stories Punters flock to PlusNet cut-price ADSL Pipex swallows Nildram Host Europe morphs into Pipex BT's DSL market share carries on falling Pipex acquires Host Europe for £31m
Tim Richardson, 08 Sep 2004

Brits develop streetwalking PC

We at El Reg are always on the lookout for exciting technological innovations, so we're absolutely delighted to flag the very latest example of cutting-edge touchscreen kit - the PUTA from London-based Atacama. Here's what the blurb has to say: The PUTA is the world’s simplest computer to own and operate. You can hang it on a wall, place on a desktop or mount on an arm above your workspace. Clean, sleek and contemporary in design it is the perfect solution for providing elegant computer access. There are no cables, the keyboard and mouse are wireless and the screen responds instantaneously to touch input. Simple and intuitive to operate, this is a state of the art, powerful computer that is whisper quiet in operation. A comprehensive options list means that you can configure the system exactly as you require it. Just select what you need and we will build a system to match your requirements. The PUTA is an entirely new concept in touchscreen information systems - powerful, scaleable and ready to use straight out of the box. Yes, we're certain that the PUTA responds instantaneously to touch input and is simple and intuitive to operate. It's also handy that it's ready to use straight out of the box, especially in Spain where discerning punters will be expecting to get immediately hands-on with their chosen PUTA. This is because PUTA means "whore" in Spanish, and Atacama - given that it is named after a Chilean desert - ought to be ashamed of this branding gaffe. We can see the Iberian advertising campaign now: "Get close-up and personal with your very own PUTA". Atacama's streetwalking PC is, of course, not the first time a company has failed to legislate against linguistic howlers. Spanish speakers take great delight in reading Nivea as "ni vea" (don't even look) and the Chevy Nova as "no va" (doesn't go). The Mitsubishi Pajero caused much merriment in Argentina, where you could be the proud owner of the latest "Wanker" and as for the Ford Pinto's Brazilian debut, well, punters decided that cruising the streets in a "small dick" was more than the Latin male psyche could stand. In the latter case, Ford quickly decided to change the name to "Corcel", and we suggest that Atacama adopts a similar strategy before unleashing its pan-European marketing campaign. ® Related stories Fuji gives photographers the two-finger salute Capgemini succumbs to rebranding madness Corel in transcendental makeover
Lester Haines, 08 Sep 2004

1394 group approves UWB 'Firewireless' tech

Firewire overseer the 1394 Trade Association (TA) has given the thumbs-up to the WiMedia Alliance's (WMA) technology to allow Firewire devices to communicate wirelessly across UWB links. The move also gives tacit approval to the Multiband OFDM Alliance's (MBOA) attempt to define a future standard for UWB connections in place of a rival specification backed by Motorola. Fed up of what it called "deadlock" in the IEEE standard-setting process, the MBOA announced last February that it would define a UWB specification outside of the IEEE's remit. It is defining the basic MAC and PHY specifications equipment makers will need to build UWB devices. The WMA formally approved the MBOA technology in April this year. The Wireless USB Promoter Group - like the MBOA, backed by Intel - is currently working to run USB over UWB, creating a Protocol Adaptation Layer (PAL) that interacts with the UWB radio system through the WMA's "convergence layer" - aka the WMA Radio Platform - which the 1394 has now approved and will form the basis for its own 'Firewireless' PAL. The PAL allows Firewire devices to communicate at up to 480Mbps, compared to 400-800Mbps over wires. The 1394 TA said it would work with the WMA to test devices to ensure they can operate across such UWB-based links and communicate correctly with other 1394 products. ® Related stories IEEE groups fight for control of key standards WiMedia directors back MBOA UWB spec Motorola and MBOA split on UWB Future rosy for UltraWideBand UWB group dumps IEEE to speed wireless USB, 1394 IEEE groups fight for control of key standards Freescale touts 1Gbps UWB chip roadmap
Tony Smith, 08 Sep 2004

419ers launch online educational facility

We're delighted to report today that would-be 419 advance fee fraudsters can now avail themselves of the finest academic training available anywhere, courtesy of the University of Nigeria. This new online resource - which heralds itself as the "World leader in ethical business studies" and "creator of the advance fee methodology and related business technologies" - will certainly prove a great hit among the lads from Lagos eager to gain paper qualifications in their chosen career. The university's comprehensive course list includes: Macro Economics 101: Learn how to leverage your success with the economy of scale that mass email marketing provides. Sending email offers one at a time is useless and a waste of your time. If you send one stupid email offer to millions and millions of people, you exert the same amount of energy and greatly increase the chance that someone will respond to your offer. History and World Events 400: Many years ago, the United States started a special group to help encourage the growth of the Nigerian economy. It was called ARPANET and is the foundation for the Internet and our current economic prosperity. This course will teach you how the United States provided us with direct links to millions of wealthy and gullible households who assisted us in funneling millions of dollars back to our home country. They are a great people and we will never forget that. Statistical Psychology 200: Research has proven that .001 percent of the world population is completely stupid, ignorant to the world around them, and will believe anything. Using this information, you will learn how to launch a mass email to 100 million people around the world and use basic psychology skills to get .001 percent of the sample group to send you money. If for example, you ask them to send you $10,000 each, .001 percent will do so and yield you a $1,000,000,000 return on your investment! (Prerequisite: Macro Economics 101 & History and World Events 400). Challenging stuff indeed. Prospective students who might be concerned that such a level of academic rigour comes with a hefty price tag need not fret unduly: Recognizing the need for assistance with tuition, University of Nigeria offers a variety of financial aid options. Our university is in the position of funding your complete tuition in addition to providing for housing, meals, and other expenses you may incur while attending school. We will wire you $10 million into your account and whatever you do not use, just send back upon graduation. You will never have to repay the gift. We will ask that you setup a fax machine on your end, are able to provide pertinent information about yourself and, in return, regard us as a family member for providing this great service. This gifting program has been made possible through Prince Daju Bajukabee and he welcomes you into his family and beautiful and lush country of Nigeria. And you can't say fairer than that. Wannabe 419ers are directed to the University of Nigeria's enrolment page. We'll leave the last word to highly-satisfied former alumnus Andy Jones: The University of Nigeria has given me the gift of happiness and financial freedom. In less than a month, I was up and running in my own international online business. I made friends with people all around the world, and convinced many of them to invest in my advanced fee service. Many people have told others about me. In fact, I think the US Government wants to do business with me 'cause they are always calling me day and night. Thank you, University of Nigeria for giving me the necessary skills to land big-fish accounts like the USA! Bootnote Thanks to reader Ged Carroll for forwarding us this delicious prospectus. Related stories Anatomy of a 419 scam Those 419 haiku results in full Reg to attend 3rd Annual Nigerian Email Conference
Lester Haines, 08 Sep 2004

Red Hat ups security for Enterprise Linux 3

Red Hat has strengthened the security of its Enterprise Linux distro. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 Update 3 limits how much damage a hacker could do. The company said the release is ahead of schedule and not a reaction to any specific threat. The update includes Exec-shield and Position Independent Executable features which protect against attacks which exploit stack and buffer memory overflows. It also extends NX (No Execute) support from Intel 2 chips to include Intel x86, EM64T and AMD 64 chips. The update also offers new drivers, support for IBM POWER5 servers and various bug fixes. According to Red Hat, the update demonstrates the splendid value offered by its software subscription model. Red Hat yesterday announced a deal to get its Red Hat Enterprise Linux software bundled on all Unisys servers. ® Related stories Neutered SCO no longer on the offensive Red Hat hit with class action (No.2) Red Hat restates results
John Oates, 08 Sep 2004

Woolworths to take on Apple iTunes store

UK High Street retailer Woolworths will this year launch a digital music download service, the company's parent revealed today. In an announcement detailing the Woolworths Group's interim results for its 2004 fiscal year, the company said the Woolworths-branded service would launch "in the run up to Christmas". However, company insiders revealed that the build-up to the launch will start "within the next few weeks". Woolworths isn't a digital music novice. In May 2003, its E.UK subsidiary announced a partnership with little-known European digital music distributor Digital Distribution Domain (DX3) to provide album downloads from Universal Music Group and EMI through its Streets Online web sites. Streets Online currently offers some 150,000 songs for download in Windows Media format. Tracks are priced at 99p, albums from £6.99 - £1 less than the very much better known UK iTunes Music Store. Some downloads may not be burned to CD, copied to a portable player. Others are available on a time-limited basis. Woolworths' own-brand store will be called Download@woolworths.co.uk and will tie in to its existing online CD retail operation, which focuses on the top 50 singles and top 100 albums. Like ITMS, Download@woolworths.co.uk will not offer a subscription service. Individual tracks will retail from 79p, while albums will cost £7.99 and up. The songs will only be made available in Windows Media format, using Windows Media Player 10's 'Janus' DRM technology. Download@woolworths.co.uk will feature content from all four major labels, and "numerous independent and small British record companies", the company said. At this stage, the two services will remain separate, and according to a company spokesman, there are "no plans" to integrate the digital delivery operations that underpin them. However, the spokesman confirmed that DX3 has been involved in the creation of Download@woolworths.co.uk. ® Related stories Apple's Jobs 'offered iTunes team-up deal to Sony' Oxfam releases download album for Darfur Nokia moves to counter Apple-Moto music alliance Apple licenses iTunes to Motorola Apple coughs up for iTunes Music Store patent Circuit City buys BestBuy music download supplier Peter Gabriel sells digital music firm OD2 unveils 1p-a-play digital music jukebox MusicNet to deliver music downloads to UK Recordstore offers MP3 and WMA tracks EMI picks partners for Euro digital music trial
Tony Smith, 08 Sep 2004

iTunes Japan hits 'inadequate DRM' hurdle

Apple's plan to open a Japanese version of its iTunes Music Store could be scuppered on local music companies' fears that its DRM technology, FairPlay, simply isn't restrictive enough. Pricing is also an issue, it seems, with labels fearing the cannibalisation of CD sales, a report in Japan's Asahi Shimbun newspaper claims. According to the report, ITMS Japan has met with opposition from a number of local music labels who claim that FairPlay is "inadequate" and are thus refusing to license their songs to Apple. At issue is the Mac maker's insistence that consumer should be allowed to burn downloaded songs to CD, a facility offered by the US, UK, German and France versions of ITMS. Existing Japanese digital music services do not support CD burning. They also charge from ¥200 ($1.83) a song - rather more than the Yen equivalent of the US store's $0.99 (¥108) download fee. "If we go lower than [¥200], CD sales will suffer," an official of a major record company told the paper. Yet at the same time, the industry needs a price that will compete with low-cost CD rental companies, he admitted. However, Apple Japan's marketing chief, Yoshiaki Sakito, told the Asahi Shimbun the clout of iPod will be sufficient to bring such waverers into line. "The record companies won't be able to swim against the tide forever," he said. ® Related stories Woolworths to take on Apple iTunes store Apple's Jobs 'offered iTunes team-up deal to Sony' Apple fans apathetic about apathy Apple faithful's apathy to blame for Napsterized schools Napster unveils portable music service Microsoft listens to the music Apple taunts Napster, Real with iTunes affiliate program HP iPod to ship 15 September Apple iPod team seeks Wi-Fi engineer Macrovision: iPod support for lock-in CDs in Q4
Tony Smith, 08 Sep 2004

Email inboxes get respite from smut

The volume of pornographic images sent as email attachments is declining, according to MessageLabs. The email filtering firm recorded one pornographic or otherwise inappropriate email for every 4,756 messages sent through its service for the six months from March – August 2004. In the same period last year, the ratio was one in 1,357 (0.07 per cent). These figures refer to porno emails and the like sent to MessageLabs customers by their mates not those sent by spammers, Paul Wood, chief information analyst at MessageLabs, explained. Inappropriate content - which includes pornography, cartoons, jokes, greetings cards and other non-work related material - can waste valuable bandwidth and offend employees. In many instances, such images are in violation of corporate acceptable usage policies, MessageLabs says. Mark Sunner, chief technology officer at MessageLabs, said a possible explanation for the drop is "growing enforcement of corporate governance requirements. For companies that use email to conduct critical business transactions and communications, corporate governance can be a great concern. We are now seeing a number of organisations using email management solutions to help ensure compliance and reduce risk. The effect of this could be one of the reasons why fewer inappropriate images are being sent via email." MessageLabs also recorded a drop in the spam and viruses in the email messages it scanned last month. Of all email scanned by MessageLabs’ Anti-Spam service in August 2004, 84.2 per cent was categorised as spam, compared to 94.5 per cent during July 2004. And 6.9 per cent of the emails scanned by MessageLabs’ Anti-Virus service were identified as virus-infected during August, a decrease from the 7.3 per cent intercepted during July. According to Sunner, the summer months are "often a quiet time for virus and spam distribution – despite exceptions like last August’s SoBig-F virus. Virus activity tends to be cyclical, with periods of stability punctuated by outbreaks of varying significance." But what about the fall in spam? MessageLabs reckons a recent US cybercrime crackdown - Operation Web Snare - in which more than 150 people were arrested for various offences, may have taken some spammers offline, or prompted others into suspending operations temporarily. ® Related stories Civil servants sacked over Net porn Shackling the email content beast HP email abuse dismissals unfair, says tribunal
John Leyden, 08 Sep 2004

UK corporate governance bill to cost millions

UK government plans to improve corporate governance will cost companies millions, a UK technology analyst firm claims. The Butler Group says that firms will have to spend heavily to ensure that there computer systems comply with the Companies (Audit, Investigations and Community Enterprise) Bill. This Bill is the UK equivalent of the US's Sarbanes-Oxley Act and it addresses shortcomings highlighted by auditing scandals such as Shell, Parmalat and Enron. In essence, it deals with accounting practices, with particular attention paid to auditing processes. Mike Davis, senior research analyst at Butler Group, said: "While the UK has always had better auditing standards than the US, the Companies Bill tightens these up still further. However, as with Sarbanes-Oxley, the only efficient and cost-effective way for UK businesses to meet the Companies Bill requirements will be through the investment in certain key technologies. Failure to make these investments quickly and correctly will leave UK businesses prone to severe financial penalties." Butler Group has produced a list of key technologies needed to meet Companies Bill requirements: BPM (Business Process Management) - ensures that specific tasks are assigned to the appropriate people within the organisation in a fully auditable and transparent way. As BPM can automate tasks, it allows the organisation to have greater control over high-risk accounting. Disaster Recovery - essential for ensuring the safe retention of keys information. Email management - taking control of emails out of the hands of employees is "essential for compliance". Identity and Access Management - ensuring the correct level of security over key information and data. Network Security - preventing unauthorised access to information and data. Policy Management - ensuring that the right policies are in place to govern the type of data stored, how long it is stored for and how it is stored. Records Management - the management of information from the moment it is stored through to its deletion. Search, Discovery and Retrieval - allows key documents, emails and other records to be found at request. ® Related stories IT voices drowned in corporate governance rush UK firms must monitor staff IMs McNealy slams Sarbanes-Oxley The IT spend time bomb
John Leyden, 08 Sep 2004

Interview with the pornogami Grand Master

ExclusiveExclusive Our recent piece on pornogami - the art of teasing paper into representations of copulating couples and human genitalia - certainly proved a hit with readers. Accordingly, we have secured an exclusive interview with the man who literally wrote the book on the subject: Master Sugoi, author of "Pornogami: a guide to the ancient art of paper-folding for adults". Below, Sugoi explains the history of pornogami, its spiritual element and offers a few tips for the wannabe pornogamist. Read on: Give us a bit of background info about yourself. Born in a log cabin on the top of Mount Fuji, the great Buddha of laughter shined down on me and inspired my creativity upon my entry into this world - or was it Toledo, Ohio? My memory of the event is a bit hazy. Tell us a bit about the history of pornogami. Origami has been around for about 800 years in Japan, brought over from Korea & China. Though Japan has a long history of Erotic art in their woodblock prints and netsuke ivory carvings, I have never seen erotic origami before. I may be a pioneer in this area, but I cannot say for sure. How and when did you first become interested in pornogami? My sister was going to see Chippendales with her friends and they were planning to bring large coins to drop in the boys' g-strings. I told her I had a better idea and folded the money into peacocks and bow ties and wondered to myself, can I make something a little more risqué? After a few quick attempts, pornogami was born back in 1988. About five years ago I made a video of my hands folding and sold it through eBay. The video turned into a small book of seven figures I self-published and sold on eBay. It was picked up by Green Candy Press and became a real book just this past summer. Estimate the number of pornogamists currently practising world-wide. As you know, the Origamiunderground.com has become a big novelty site known internationally and has probably brought more exposure to erotic origami. I would have to guess the number of folders is in the thousands, but only a few invent! I would estimate about 20 world-wide. What do the Japanese make of pornogami? Hmmm... They either love it or HATE it. The hip 20-somethings seem to really like it, but traditionalists see it as a bastardization of an ancient art. When I was selling the handmade book on eBay though my first orders were for Japan. Is pornogami in any way related to Feng Shui? Nope, Not at all. Does pornogami have a spiritual as well as a pornographic element? The actual invention of a pornogami figure is spiritual indeed. To become one with the paper, to caress it, ease it into position after position, to coax it and convince it to do what you desire. If you go to far it can be quite messy, but when Ki (spiritual energy) flows and the folder becomes one with the figure, it can be quite satisfying. Most people will never know the true pleasure of invention, but do enjoy following the well worn path to sexual enlightenment. When folded with your sexual partner, pornogami can be fun to teach, spark conversation and hopefully passion. Some people are uncomfortable about talking about their sexual desires and pornogami may be a way to break through the frigid ice. I find that they really get attention when I am in a bar or club and want to get noticed. The money folds make an awesome tip your bartender will never forget. Is the pornogami acolyte at any stage required to change his or her name to "Grasshopper" and walk on rice paper in a candle-filled temple like that bloke in Kung Fu? I am not suppose to tell you this, but they do need to fold a vagina from a sheet of wet rice paper while nude during a new moon. Some go on to copulate with the figure, but that practice if frowned upon - or laughed at. What's the age of consent for pornogami and do you think it should be lowered to, say, 14? I don't think teenagers would find genitalia of any interest. They are so sophisticated these days. What's the best way for the tyro pornogamist to get started and what's a good sexual position for beginners? It's really hard to fold when you are on top! I have bruises to prove it, but while on one's back, I can recommend the basic breast fold, not too difficult while one is "otherwise engaged". What do you consider to be the most technically-challenging piece of pornogami? In my book it is the last figure called the 3-D Penis. It has veins and can be seen from any angle even from the bottom. It's very sculptural. Definitely my favorite. At some point I was calling it a Paper Dildo. In any case, I am very proud of the figure but hesitate showing it to my mother who is usually proud of everything I do. You have written a book on pornogami. As with all proper interviews, we'll now give you a chance to shamelessly plug it... The book is available world-wide through Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble, and most major book sellers for about $15.00. If your bookstore doesn't carry it they can order it, just ask. I actually prefer people to demand their local store carries it. If you want a signed/inscribed copy you can go to my website or you can e-mail Mastersugoi care of AOL.com. Finally, do you have any plans to nominate pornogami as an Olympic sport? If it is coupled with gymnastics, I think that would be hot! Agreed. With that lovely thought, we'll let you get back to your pornogami. Thank you. As noted above, Master Sugoi's "Pornogami" is available from firehousegallery.com. You can also get it at Amazon.com or Barnes & Noble. Related links Bored? Try pornogami
Lester Haines, 08 Sep 2004

Wi-Fi Alliance unveils media streaming quality tech

The Wi-Fi Alliance (WFA) today introduced its Wi-Fi Multimedia (WMM) brand, as anticipated, and announced the first nine products that support it. But despite touting the new technology as central to bringing the wireless networking technology into the consumer electronics world, the list of certified products comprises the usual list of access points and PC add-in card adaptors. To be fair, the WFA admits that WMM is really just a first step toward greater use of Wi-Fi in CE products, and we can look forward the arrival of more wireless consumer kit as we get nearer the holiday sales period. "We see this action jumpstarting the coming mainstream adoption of Wi-Fi in the consumer electronics market segment," said WFA managing director Frank Hanzlik in a statement. WMM provides the packet prioritisation component from the upcoming 802.11e quality of service standard, allowing packets containing time-dependent data such as audio or video to be sent ahead of data that can safely wait a few microseconds. Such technology will play a key role in home entertainment networks set up to pump multiple TV, video and audio streams around the house. The WFA wants to get in early, not only to make sure such products are available as soon as, but to provide CE vendors with a guarantee of interoperability. The first certified products include kit from Atheros, Intel, Broadcom, Cisco, Instant802, Conexant and Philips. ® Related stories Wi-Fi overseer to debut QoS standard 8 Sept Wi-Fi group updates security system Wi-Fi Alliance moots security set-up standard Handset makers tout Wi-Fi, GSM roaming spec Ericsson ditches Bluetooth Aruba touts Wi-Fi grid scheme
Tony Smith, 08 Sep 2004
server room

Europe wants its own SAN demo labs

Emboldened by the success of the Solutions Centre at this year's Storage Networking World Europe, the SNIA-Europe board wants to create its own European technology working group, and will look at building a European SAN technology demonstration centre. SNIA technical work has historically been almost entirely US-based, with its main demonstration centre being based in Colorado Springs. Regional groups such as SNIA-E focused instead on education and awareness. However, this week saw more than 100 SAN experts from 16 companies get together in Frankfurt to build and demonstrate a multi-vendor storage network. "The Solution Centre group has demonstrated European technical capability for the first time," says SNIA-E chairman Paul Talbut. "The collaboration has been on a scale never seen before here, and it would be a waste just to pack all that expertise up tomorrow and see it go away." Visitors to the Solution Centre saw demos of SAN management, multi-vendor management via SNIA's SMI-S standards, and IP storage. Rainer Erkens, who chairs SNIA-E's solution committee, says planning for this started back in February and culminated with three weeks of testing at IBM's nearby Mainz facility. "We have gained a lot of experience working together and we shouldn't lose that," he says. "We need to capture that technical expertise, and possibly build the justification for a European technology centre," agrees Talbut. "That has to deliver value to end users though, and be very clearly thought through." Several companies already have European SAN technology labs, including IBM, and StorageTek in Toulouse. Talbut adds that, with SNIA-E taking control of SNW-Europe away from the SNW-US organisers and moving it to Frankfurt, the number of delegates is almost back up to pre-2001 levels, when the event was still called EuroStorage. Nearly 800 users and buyers registered to attend this year, which was more than double last year's event in Cannes - and Talbut says most of them actually turned up, too. ® Related stories Euro SAN groups merge at last Is SNIA's shared storage model a dead end? Euro storage network bodies to merge
Bryan Betts, 08 Sep 2004

1,000 workers rally behind Swansea IT strikers

Around a thousand people attended a demonstration in support of striking IT workers in Swansea this lunchtime, with 500 people marching through the city centre before meeting up with colleagues for a rally. One marcher told us: "The demo was extremely well attended. It was a rally of supprt for IT staff and a reaffirmation of the union's stand against the privatisation of public sector service. This show of support is an example to all public sector workers across the country that public services should remain public." One hundred IT workers at Swansea council are in their fourth week of industrial action over plans to outsource the local authority's IT department to a private firm as part of a new service@swansea e-government initiative. Staff are concerned that if the department it outsourced to a private company, other council functions could also be privatised. As a result of these concerns, 5,000 Unison union staff at the council are to be balloted for industrial action, in what officials fear could lead to a damaging escalation of disruption. Swansea Council today accused Unison of "holding the people of Swansea to ransom" with the threat of bringing the city to a standstill with a "needless all-out strike". Gerald Clement, deputy eader of Swansea Council, said: "Unison is threatening an all-out strike and to halt vital public services over something that may never happen. Unison must realise that this is not a game; it is playing with people's lives. "If Unison goes on all-out strike are they happy for people not to be buried, weddings to be postponed, rubbish left in the streets, children not to be educated and the most vulnerable and needy left without vital support? "The council has tried to resolve this dispute, it has been open and fair throughout this process but Unison keeps on shifting the goalposts and changing their stance. "We are living in the 21st century, yet the union appears to be caught in a 1970s time warp where it thinks the only way to resolve a dispute is to hold a gun to the council's head." Unison dismissed Councillor Clement's comments as scaremongering, with Keith Jenkins, Unison shop steward for ICT, rejecting the council's claim that it has been transparent about the proposed service@swansea scheme. "It has not been an open and fair process. It has been about evasion, half truths, secrecy and deceit," he said. ® Related stories Swansea IT strikers go marching on 5000 Swansea staff to vote on strike Swansea IT strikers reject 'sabotage' claim Bin men walk out in support of Swansea IT strike Swansea IT striker speaks out IT staff strike 'indefinitely' in Swansea Swansea IT staff to strike over outsourcing deal Swansea IT jobs are 'safe', says council Swansea Council IT staff threaten strike over outsourcing
Tim Richardson, 08 Sep 2004

McAfee to eradicate app assassin bug

McAfee is promising to release a signature updates to its AV software later today in order to prevent a popular ISP connection manager programme from been mislabelled as Trojan horse code. The false positive meant that some versions of ISPWizard, an internet setup program wizard, was labelled as the BackDoor-AKZ Trojan by users running the latest update of McAfee's AV software. The error was introduced with a McAfee AV update released on 1 September and only affected end users running the latest McAfee update and older versions of ISPWizard. But when those conditions are met, ISPWizard will be unceremoniously ripped from users' systems. This means that several people are unable to connect to their ISPs because the software that they need has been automatically deleted by McAfee. ISPWizard is widely used by many small ISPs particularly in the US. Fixing the problem normally involves a call by end users to their ISPs, disabling McAfee and reinstalling ISP connection software. Shoot first and ask questions later Following our story on the issue yesterday, McAfee has come back with a response. Lee Fisher, of McAfee's AVERT Labs, its anti-virus research arm, said: "Customers using the daily DATs already have the fix, customers with weekly DATs will get the fix Wednesday. If a customer contacts support/AVERT they are supplied an immediate fix, alternatively the customer can exclude the file through the user interface and the problem disappears." ISPWizard developer Mark Griffiths said that McAfee's workarounds thus far only help people when files have already been deleted, too late in his opinion. He remains highly critical of McAfee's decision not to release a consumer update before now. Griffiths told El Reg: "Regardless of how this problem came to be, I'm still very unhappy with their response to the problem and the coding of their software to "Shoot first and ask questions later" - i.e. to delete the file without any prior warning to the user. It seems to me that McAfee is trying to do it's best to shift as much of the blame for the original problem away from itself." So why was ISPWizard mislabelled as malicious code in the first place? McAfee's Fisher has the following to offer: "This type of thing happens because the code is very similar in design or technique to known malware, and as McAfee now have the 'known good' file, the problem disappears forever. It's unfortunate that it's happened, but McAfee takes extreme measures to ensure these problems are kept to a minimum, scanning the DATs [AV signature files] for false positives against almost two terabytes (some 30 million files) of known good code." Griffiths is scathing about this explanation. "I reject the claim that the code is similar in design or technique to known malware - my own analysis indicates that McAfee is matching on non code sections of the file. McAfee certainly didn't take any 'extreme measures' to fix the problem once they were informed of the problem either." ® Related stories McAfee AV ate my application Email deletion bug baffles McAfee Murder on the Outlook Express McAfee virus update damages NT 4.0 files Email deletion bug bites Norton Internet Security Symantec undeletes mail deletion bug
John Leyden, 08 Sep 2004

Feds go for hypothetical defence in airline ID case

There may or may not be a rule requiring ID in order to board a plane in the US, but we can't tell you that, because if it exists it's classified. "We" here being the US Department of Justice, which appears to have been smoked out by Electronic Frontier Foundation cofounder John Gilmore. Gilmore's argument that the ID requirement is unconstitutional is perhaps a little extreme, but the Feds' refusal to say publicly whether or not it exists is a plot line worthy of Franz Kafka. Wired reports that on Friday DoJ lawyers filed a request to present the rebuttal to Gilmore's case in secret, saying that if a requirement for ID exists then it would be in a classified security directive, and therefore could not be revealed in open court. The case has already been decided against Gilmore in the district court, but he is now appealing. The DoJ motion, available here, points out that the district court decided the case on the government's motion to dismiss, and that "all parties and the court simply assumed the truth of plaintiff's allegation regarding the existence and content of the security directive described in plaintiff's Complaint." But it might not, apparently, in which case one wonders what everybody was doing down the courthouse. Or it might, because "this Court might find the precise content of any alleged security directive to be necessary for resolution of plaintiff's appeal." But "any such directive" can't, according to federal statute be disclosed in open court. So the lawyers want to file materials and their opposing brief under seal. They also propose to file a redacted, unsealed version, so if that happens we can all have fun imagining what the blacked out bits might (or might not) say. Gilmore is no stranger to airline run-ins. Last year he was thrown off a British Airways flight from San Francisco for refusing to remove a lapel badge reading "Suspected Terrorist." His display of the badge apparently endangered the aircraft's security, according to BA. ® Related links: Gilmore's air campaign site
John Lettice, 08 Sep 2004

Cadence poaches another Intel server staffer

IDF Fall '04IDF Fall '04 Cadence has pulled another former Intel server staffer over to its side, hiring Ajay Malhotra, The Register has learned. Malhotra served as Intel's general manager in charge of marketing for server processors. He will join current Cadence CEO Mike Fister, who was formerly Intel's server processor chief. Intel confirmed Malhotra's departure, saying he left a few days ago. A few other lower level former Intel workers have joined Cadence as well, according to Intel. A Cadence spokeswoman was unable to find Malhotra in the company's directory, likely meaning he has not started to work at Cadence just yet. The spokeswoman, however, assured us that she is trying to locate Malhotra. God's speed. Malhotra certainly isn't a huge name, but he did play a central role in hawking Intel's Xeon and Itanium processors. ® Related stories Cadence finds Intel's missing Fister Analyst sees St. Fister in Itanium wafer Choice is king in the promised land of 64-bit computing
Ashlee Vance, 08 Sep 2004

Sasser kid charged with computer sabotage

The self-confessed author of the infamous Sasser worm has been charged with computer sabotage. Sven Jaschan, 18, was arrested in the village of Waffensen near Rotenburg, in northern Germany, in connection with writing and distributing the Sasser worm back in May. He later confessed to police that he was both the author of Sasser and the original author of the NetSky worm. The computer sabotage charges, announced by prosecutors today, come as little surprise. AP reports that German prosecutors have picked three German city governments and a broadcaster whose systems were disrupted by Sasser as specimen victims in the prosecution against Jaschan. These organisations were selected from the 143 plaintiffs with estimated damages of $157,000 who have contacted the authorities. All indications are that this is the tip of a very large iceberg. Jaschan was arrested after a tip-off to Microsoft from individuals hoping to cash in through Microsoft's Anti-Virus Reward Program. Investigators questioned Jaschan's mates on suspicion of assisting his virus writing activities but none have been charged. It's unclear whether Jaschan will be tried in a regular court, where a sentence of up to five years for computer sabotage can be imposed or a juvenile court. A trial date or venue is yet to be announced. ® Related stories Sasser kid blamed for viral plague Police probe Sasser informant Sasser copycats get busy German police arrest Sasser worm suspect
John Leyden, 08 Sep 2004

Register accused of publishing lies!

FoTWFoTW This one is a classic. We ran a story yesterday about Intel sampling Rosedale silicon, following an announcement about the same at the Intel Developer Forum. We think of this kind of thing as traditional reporting: we go to a press conference, the company provides information, we write it down and publish it, with some additional commentary, on El Reg for you to read. But, lo, not all readers were impressed. It has been a long time since we've been accused of fabricating stories: Hi Looking at the Register Web Site I notice 3 IDF Articals just wondering ware you got your source becuase Ive Checked Intels Web Site and cant find any of that information. I thought the Register was a good news source seems not you publish lies or dont tell it corretly Daniel Well. We couldn't let that go, so we dropped him a short note pointing out that we are at IDF. Reporting on announcements. Made by Intel. Fortunately, he replied saying that this was "fair enough". Good to know, we're sure you'll agree. And now that we have Daniel's blessing, we'll get on with reporting the news. ®
Lucy Sherriff, 08 Sep 2004

Nokia walks tightrope with Metrowerks acquisition

Nokia moved to secure the ground for its application developers today by announcing a deal with Motorola's Metrowerks tools division, which provides the primary development tools for its Symbian platform. Two dozen Metrowerks staff will join Nokia, which will also license the debugger, compiler and IDE and has promised to provide extensions. Symbian has based its application development on Metrowerks CodeWarriors for several years, although the 32-bit Symbian OS began life on Microsoft Visual C++, which is not, in retrospect, one of Psion Software's better ideas. Nokia clearly wants to make development process more attractive, or in the words of the canned statement, "benefit the entire Symbian ecosystem, resulting in faster time to market by providing a single source for platform and device development processes." Metrowerks won its spurs by producing a compiler that saved Apple's PowerPC launch a decade ago, and it has since blossomed into a company that supports around twenty different hardware architectures and in addition dozens of real-time operating systems, in addition to Palm, Windows, Mac OS X and Linux. Motorola acquired it five years ago, and it belongs to Moto's Freescale chip division. Nokia should be able to give the suite more attention and tender loving care. However, Nokia is likely to find itself accused of taking over the Symbian development process once again. The recent pre-emption process at Symbian showed that interest in the OS was healthy and broad, with several Symbian shareholders upping their stakes to prevent Nokia grabbing Psion's former Symbian stake in its entirety. But not only does Sony Ericsson base its Symbian work on a non-Nokia UI, Nokia's rivals are also keen to see that it isn't tilting the playing field its way. Today's press release studiously avoided placing the word "acquires" in the headline, but more diplomatic skills might be needed, too. Still, you never heard the accusation that Motorola was slanting it towards its own embedded platforms, so may be it will prove to be less of a wedge than its rivals hope. ® Related stories Symbian founder on mobile past, present and future SonyEricsson cuts Linux P800 fee to zero Motorola to buy Metrowerks
Andrew Orlowski, 08 Sep 2004

Intel looks to fend off AMD with new 2006 chipset

ExclusiveExclusive Come 2006, Intel plans to make some significant shifts in its Xeon processor line of products with the introduction of the Blackford chipset, The Register can exclusively confirm. In May, we brought the first word on Blackford, and now Intel is finally ready to admit the chipset does in fact exist. "You'll see some different platforms architectures around Blackford," said Richard Dracott, general manager of Intel's enterprise platforms group, in an interview. "It's our chipset for the dual-processor server market due out in 2006." Dracott would not budge on further details, but our sources have revealed Blackford will ship with a 1066MHz front side bus. The high-speed FSB will be just one of several adjustments Intel plans to make with its 2006ish Xeon products. The company is trying to adjust to a new threat from AMD's Opteron processor, which many analysts and customers believe is superior to Xeon with regard to memory performance and multiprocessor server designs. Intel is currently somewhat gated by its FSB and north bridge and can only keep its processors fed with a limited amount of memory. The company, however, is now saying that it may well move to a new design to make up for these deficiencies. "Just because we are going one route doesn't mean that we are married to that route," said Nimish Modi, VP in Intel's enterprise group. "We may come up with a different solution." One addition Intel will make is via the use of fully buffered DIMM technology (FDB), which should improve memory performance. Intel also says that it's ahead of AMD with support for DDR2 memory because of its chipset designs. One analyst, however, doubts that Intel will be able to make any major chipset shift until 2007, when Intel releases a common chipset for its Xeon and Itanium processors. "Given Intel's current roadmap, the first opportunity they have to change their approach is with that common architecture," said Nathan Brookwood of InSight64. "Because until then, they have a series of processors and a series of north bridges and each new processor has to work with the old, and each new north bridge has to work with the old." "Intel only has one memory controller and that has to supply all of the memory bandwidth for all the processors attached to it. AMD adds a new memory controller for each new processor, so a four-way server has four times as much memory bandwidth." ® Related stories Cadence poaches another Intel server staffer Intel admits Itanium pains, plots server future Intel preps 2MB L2 Pentium 4 6xx line?
Ashlee Vance, 08 Sep 2004

Intel talks dual Pentium Ms

IDF Fall '04IDF Fall '04 Intel fleshed out its Centrino mobile CPU roadmap today, with details of the Sonoma platform, and a promised delivery date of Q105. The company also announced its next-generation mobile platform, codenamed Napa. In his keynote, Anand Chandrasekher, general manager of Intel’s Mobile Platforms Group, said that Sonoma is designed to provide the basis for mobile entertainment system. He ran a demo on the platform, which he touts as the ideal technology for college students - it could also include a TV tuner, and would work with a remote control. As well as incorporating the Intel PRO/Wireless 2915ABG network connection Sonoma includes a new Intel Pentium M processor sporting a 533MHz front-side bus and a chipset code-named Alviso. After Sonoma comes Napa. Napa will include a dual core processor dubbed "Yonah". This is the first mobile-optimised dual core CPU, based on Intel's new 65nm process. Napa will include the Calistoga graphics chipset, and gets its connectivity from Golan, Intel's provocatively-dubbed next-gen wireless technology. Napa is "totally optimised for mobility from the ground up, and will provide performance on-demand," Chandrasekher said. ® Related stories AMD heralds OS support for dual-core CPUs Wi-Fi overseer to debut QoS standard 8 Sept Intel unveils tri-mode Wi-Fi for Centrino
Lucy Sherriff, 08 Sep 2004

HP gears up for Opteron server binge

ExclusiveExclusive HP has developed a strong appetite for AMD's Opteron processor and plans to feed the beast early next year with a host of new systems, The Register can reveal. Impressed with the success of its four-processor ProLiant DL585 system, HP will ship an in-house designed two-processor system dubbed the ProLiant DL385 in January, according to sources here at the Intel Developer Forum (IDF). HP already sells the two-processor ProLiant DL145 system with Opteron chips, but that product is believed to have been made by design house Newisys. On the blade front, HP will come out with the BL25p, BL35p and BL45p systems - all with Opteron processors, our sources said. The BL25p will debut late this year or early next year with 2.4GHz Opterons, and the BL35p will arrive at the same time but at half the size of the BL25p. The bulkier BL45p will ship later in 2005 and will allows customers to pack twice as many systems in a chassis as the current BL40p. HP earlier this year announced its Opteron blade plans. The blade systems will also be available with a Cisco switch. IBM trumped HP in a sense earlier this year by offering a Cisco switch with its blade gear. Up to this point, HP has been relying on a Northern Telecom switch, but who wants that? HP, however, will one-up IBM with its Cisco switch. The HP co-branded product will be 100 percent Cisco, as opposed to the product made for IBM that contains some Broadcom chips. Our sources indicate that Intel has started to get nervous about the quantity of deals HP has won with its DL585 Opteron box. HP is the leading seller of Xeon-based boxes, but there is a bit more buzz around Opteron boxes these days. HP and Sun have established themselves as the clear Opteron server leaders, and it's hard to imagine IBM and Dell waiting much longer to deliver two- and four-processor general purpose boxes of their own. Until they do, it seems HP will happily scoop up as many deals as it can. ® Related stories Intel looks to fend off AMD with new 2006 chipset Sun to bring Opteron, Linux to telcos Intel admits Itanium pains, plots server future AMD to demo dual-core Opteron box
Ashlee Vance, 08 Sep 2004