19th > August > 2004 Archive

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British Gas warns punters about rogue diallers

British Gas is writing to all of its 400,000 telephone customers warning them about rogue dialler scams that hijack their computers and run up huge phone bills.
Tim Richardson, 19 Aug 2004
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DIY phishing kits hit the Net

Do-it-yourself phishing kits are being made available for download free of charge from the Internet, according to anti-virus firm Sophos.
John Leyden, 19 Aug 2004
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Nintendo patents key console online gaming features

Nintendo has been granted a US patent that yields it the ownership of key online multi-player gaming facilities, including player league tables, voice communications and online gaming host services.
Tony Smith, 19 Aug 2004
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Lindows postpones IPO

Lindows is postponing its IPO, citing market conditions. The Linux distro vendor has not abandoned the idea altogether - its S-1 registration statement remains on file with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Drew Cullen, 19 Aug 2004

Cornice countersues Seagate

Cornice has countersued hard drive rival Seagate, the maker of micro hard drives said yesterday.
Tony Smith, 19 Aug 2004
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Microsoft wins another Eolas web patent battle

The US Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) has ruled, once again, that The University of Califonia's controversial '906' browser patent is invalid. The decision gives Microsoft the upper hand in its battle with university spin-off Eolas, the sole licensee of the patent.
Lucy Sherriff, 19 Aug 2004
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Sony, MS trim UK console prices

Microsoft and Sony yesterday trimmed the prices of the Xbox and PlayStation 2 as the pair square up against each other for the coming Christmas sales period - not to mention couch potatoes who've spent the summer on the sofa, eyes glued to the Olympics.
Tony Smith, 19 Aug 2004
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Aussie wireless broadband firm hints at iTunes launch

An Australian WISP has signed a deal with Apple that suggests the Mac maker will soon open its iTunes Music Store down under.
Tony Smith, 19 Aug 2004
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Number crunching boffins unearth crypto flaws

Cryptographic researchers have discovered weaknesses in the encryption algorithms that underpin the security and integrity of electronic signatures.
John Leyden, 19 Aug 2004
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Google goes GOOG at $85 a share

Google has finally set its IPO share price at $85 and will debut on the Nasdaq today as GOOG. The news follows the Securities and Exchange Commission's decision, yesterday afternoon, to greenlight the IPO.
Lucy Sherriff, 19 Aug 2004
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3 UK claims 1.2m subscribers

3 UK today claimed 1.2 million subscribers, at last taking it above the million subscriber target it set for itself to reach by Christmas last year. Worldwide, the Hutchison Whampoa-owned 3G mobile phone network operator has 3.2 million subscribers as of today, a net gain of 2.5 million customers in six months.
Drew Cullen, 19 Aug 2004
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Virgin Radio touts Napster chart deal

UK station Virgin Radio is to begin broadcasting weekly chart rundowns based on Napster's online single sales figures, even as the Virgin Group's own digital music business, Virgin Digital, prepares to launch in the US and UK.
Tony Smith, 19 Aug 2004
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Alienware evolves from gamers to corporates

Alienware UK has updated its web site in a bid to shed its image as a purveyor of odd-looking, geek-friendly systems and recast itself as a provider of odd-looking business, creative consumer-friendly products.
Tony Smith, 19 Aug 2004
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Nortel fires seven beancounters (and 3,500 more)

Nortel Networks is firing seven finance employees in the wake of an accounting scandal which has already claimed the scalps of its former president and chief executive officer, chief financial officer and controller. At the same time the data networking equipment vendor is waving goodbye to 3,500 staff, mostly in North America, in cost-cutting moves.
Drew Cullen, 19 Aug 2004
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US broadband use tops dial-up

More people access the Net in the US using a broadband connection than by dial-up, according to the latest stats from Nielsen//NetRatings.
Tim Richardson, 19 Aug 2004
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Oracle joins the monthly patch bandwagon

Oracle is following Microsoft's lead in adopting as monthly patch cycle starting at the end of this month.
John Leyden, 19 Aug 2004
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Amazon snaps up Chinese etailer

Amazon.com is moving in on China, by buying Joyo.com, the country's biggest retailer of books, music and videos. The deal values Joyo.com - which is headquartered in the British Virgin Islands - at $75m (£41m).
Tim Richardson, 19 Aug 2004
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Epson parades tea cup-sized flying robot

Epson has developed a flying-robot that is the size of a teacup, but which is controlled remotely by Bluetooth for the duration of its three-minute flights.
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Neptune shows off five new moons

A team of international astronomers has found five new moons orbiting Neptune. Previously the planet had seven known moons, including a couple of oddities: Triton and Nereid. The moons were discovered in observations made from ground-based telescopes in Chile and Hawaii.
Lucy Sherriff, 19 Aug 2004

Motorola plumps for HP Linux-on-Itanium bozes

In a somewhat surprising move, telecommunications equipment maker Motorola has chosen a variant of Hewlett-Packard's Itanium rack servers and Carrier-Grade Linux as the foundation of two of its next-generation lines of mobile telecom switching equipment. HP will be pleased with the news, as it proves that its Itanium platform has genuine market potential.
Datamonitor, 19 Aug 2004
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South Pole 'cyberterrorist' hack wasn't the first

It's a tale Tom Clancy might have written. From their lair in distant Romania, shadowy cyber extortionists penetrate the computers controlling the life support systems at a Antarctic research station, confronting the 58 scientists and contractors wintering over at the remote post with the sudden prospect of an icy death. After some twists and turns, the researchers are saved in the fourth act by an international law enforcement effort led by FBI agents wielding a controversial, but misunderstood, federal surveillance law.
Kevin Poulsen, 19 Aug 2004
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Cisco warns on router bug

In brief Cisco yesterday warned of a bug in its routing software that could be exploited in denial of service attacks. The network giant has issued a software patch for its Internetwork Operating System (IOS) software to defend against exploitation.
John Leyden, 19 Aug 2004
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IBM threatens SCO with GPL hearing

Tech behemoth IBM has accused SCO of copyright infringement because it did not abide by the GNU General Public License (GPL) in using IBM's copyrighted work. IBM is seeking summary judgment for an injunction against SCO.
Thomas C Greene, 19 Aug 2004
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Should Google blame Foot in Mouth disease, or Evil Bankers?

Analysis Thanks to a cocktail of junk science and blind faith, techno-utopians love to believe that markets are "self-correcting". Only this doesn't apply to the stock market this week, they now tell us. Google's admirers are determined to believe that Wall Street has somehow conspired to wreck the company's initial public offering.
Andrew Orlowski, 19 Aug 2004
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Court tells RIAA and Congress to let P2P software thrive

The same court that once helped shutdown Napster delivered a punishing blow today to the record labels, confirming an earlier decision that P2P networks are legal. The court then went one step further to say it's unwise to alter copyright law in a way that could stifle innovation just to suit well-established players in a market, given the ways in which technology often changes the market for the better in the long run.
Ashlee Vance, 19 Aug 2004
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Database snafu puts US Senator on terror watch list

US Senator Ted Kennedy (Democrat, Massachusetts) was prohibited from flying because his name sparked a terror alert, the Associated Press reports. Apparently, the Senator's name came up on a terrorist watch list, or no-fly list, while attempting to board a US Airways shuttle out of Washington.
Thomas C Greene, 19 Aug 2004
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Infected in 20 minutes

Opinion What normally happens within twenty minutes? That's how long your average unprotected PC running Windows XP, fresh out of the box, will last once it's connected to the Internet.
Scott Granneman, 19 Aug 2004