11th > November > 2003 Archive

The Register breaking news

China doubles DIY 3G bounty

The People's Republic of China is to invest another 1.4 billion yuan in its homegrown, royalty-skipping 3G technology, TD-SCDMA this week. That's around $170 million, double the amount the MST, the Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology, invested in August.
The Register breaking news

MS to carpet bomb channel with phones?

According to DigiTimes, Microsoft has doubled the minimum requirement for smartphone manufacturers from 50,000 to 100,000 units. With Mitac promising ten Smartphone 2003-based devices next year, we face the possibility of an abundance - perhaps an over-abundance - of phones in 2004.
The Register breaking news

Move your landline number to a mobile

The US telecoms regulator yesterday reminded local landline providers not to delay customers who want to switch their telephone number to a cellphone. Wireless carriers had been worried that the Baby Bells would force each carrier to make a peering arrangement. The FCC yesterday said the landline providers ought to be able to make the switch in two and a half hours - which is a target, but not mandatory - even if the departing customer hadn't settled the bill.
The Register breaking news

BT flogs bluephones to the masses

BT has re-entered the consumer mobile market with a £5m advertising campaign for its BT Mobile Home service and plans to launch its ‘bluephone’ dual-mode fixed/wireless handset early next year.
The Register breaking news

Intel to take P4, P4EE to 3.4GHz next quarter – report

Intel will take the Pentium 4 Extreme Edition - along with the regular version - to 3.4GHz during the first quarter of 2004, presumably in a buffer for the initial absence of high clock frequency versions of the next generation of the Pentium 4, the 90nm 'Prescott'.
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Wi-Fi chipmakers of the World unite!

Conexant and GlobespanVirata are to merge in a $969m all-stock deal that takes them head-to-head with Broadcom in the broadband digital home and Wi-Fi markets. The merger comes less than four months after GlobespanVirata acquired WLAN chipmaker Intersil for $365m and raises question marks over the future roadmap for the Wi-Fi range.
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Watchdog bans Apple Power Mac G5 ads

Apple adverts that claimed its Power Mac G5 was "the world's fastest, most powerful personal computer" have been banned in the UK following complaints from eight AMD fans... er... viewers.

Qwest to sell VoiP to Harry Homeowner

Dick Notebaert, CEO of US western states telco Qwest pulled a surprise as he addressed an industry c onference this week, announcing that Qwest will take Voice over IP services to the masses.
Faultline, 11 2003
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Now we are one. Freeview claims 2M couch potatoes

The UK’s digital TV experiment Freeview is just one year old but has just passed the 2 million homes mark that represents about an 8.3% market share in the UK Television market.
Faultline, 11 2003
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Sony unveils ‘video iPod’

Reg Kit Watch Reg Kit Watch Portable video player Sony has launched a portable personal digital video player under its Vaio brand in Japan . The GigaPocket PCVA-HVP20 features a 20GB hard drive, enough to hold up to 31 hours of programming - if you're pretty frugal with image quality, natch. The GigaPocket is a compact 12 x 8.4 x 2.8cm (4.8 …
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AMD names VIP first UK Associate Distributor

Warrington-based distributor VIP Computer Center has been granted Associate Distributor status by AMD - the first company gain such accreditation in the UK and one of only a four in Europe.
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Sony preps updated CD copy protection trial

Sony will test its latest CD copy protection mechanism in Germany next week that blocks ripping but allows tracks to be transferred to "authorised" portable music players.
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Revealed: US console installed base figures

The release of Activision's financial results yesterday brought with it a helpful breakdown of the installed bases of the various consoles in North America, including projections through to the end of financial year 2003/04.
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Mission impossible? Blunkett's big biometric ID adventure

Today UK home secretary David Blunkett rolled out his plans for national ID cards. They will cost "£35" over a ten year period for individuals, but will be free for "all those who do not want or need a driving licence or passport" (which means they're already compulsory for these two groups), and the add-on cost, based on the assumption that passport and driving licence will go biometric anyway, will only be £4. Blunkett claimed support of 80 per cent of the public for this £4 bargain, which will nevertheless look remarkably like an extra £35 on passports and driving licences.
The Register breaking news

Belkin disables router spamming feature

Belkin, the consumer networking and connectivity firm, has promised customers a firmware upgrade to disable a controversial 'spamming' feature built into its routers.
The Register breaking news

Eudora users warned over ‘reply to all’ trick

A buffer overflow vulnerability in Eudora, the popular email client, creates a mechanism for crackers to compromise targeted PCs.
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Retailers join zero-profit DRM ‘gold rush’

"The gold rush is finally beginning," an Insight researcher called Phil Leigh told the San Jose Mercury News this week, commenting on the decision of Comcast and Best Buy to begin commercial MP3 download services.
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Net pedants quell Matrix Revolutions

Pity if you will the humble Hollywood film director, struggling to provide intellectually-challenging yet entertaining cinematic product on a mere $120 million while battling against studios, producers and heartless bean counters.

Oracle chokes on PeopleSoft's poison pill

Oracle may have to abandon its $7.3 billion hostile takeover bid for PeopleSoft because of the enterprise software firm's licensing-fee refund program.
The Register breaking news

Linux on the desktop – the man from Armonk, he say yes!

Linux is now officially ready for the desktop, and you all have permission to stop buying Windows client systems and buy Linux ones instead. From, we presume, IBM and its friends, seeing it's IBM that has this week given its approval. IBM has previously been noted both for its readiness to sell Linux on its own very wonderful servers and its cautionary advice that Linux is not ready for the desktop. On Monday, however, Sam Docknevich of IBM Global Services said that Linux is ready to "blossom" on the desktop.
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Penn State trustee and RIAA lawyer denies conflict of interests

Penn State University, the RIAA and Napster - the axis of spiel - continue to defy the laws of common sense and economics that our country once held dear.
The Register breaking news

WorldPay recovers from massive attack

Analysis WorldPay's systems are back running normally this week following the most serious and sustained Internet attack on a UK business to date.
The Register breaking news

Merriam-Webster explains disappearing McJob

Merriam-Webster is revising a web page for its Collegiate Dictionary after a McDonalds executive complained about the inclusion of the word 'McJob'. The publisher insisted that the two events are not related, and told us today that the word remained in the dictionary and would be restored online.

HP pulls together Windows, Linux, Unix and a lot more

HP's adaptive enterprise is, well, adapting.