2nd > November > 2003 Archive

SQL Server on a non MS platform? Never!

The analyst community has long been saying that it’s only a matter of time before Microsoft starts porting its applications, especially its server-based business applications, to Linux. But one Microsoft notable, in the form of Gordon Mangione, corporate vice president, SQL Server Team, made a strong and clear statement that SQL Server would never be ported to other environments, when he addressed developers last week at the Microsoft Professional Developers Conference (PDC) in Los Angeles. He was preaching the beauty of web services and how in the forthcoming Yukon version of SQL server, which is currently in beta, a stored procedure in an SQL database can be exposed as a web service, when he said: “Now, some of you are probably scratching your head and going, 'Why would I want to do that?' You know, a question I get asked a lot is, 'Gee, Gord, when are you going to port SQL Server to other operating systems?' Not going to happen. When it comes right down to it, there's just too much of an opportunity cost, too much I can't take advantage of in the underlying operating system, too many things that, frankly, if I had to port to 17 different flavors, we wouldn't go and do.” Microsoft’s mission instead is to make SQL interoperable with other environments through web service, or at least this is the implication of Mangione’s comments. “It's why we built the JDBC driver for SQL Server, and it's why Web services is so critical to everything we do, because it allows you to get access to your data independent of whatever machine you're trying to connect to,” he said. ® © Copyright 2003 News IS News IS is a weekly newsletter published by Rethink Research, a London-based publishing and consulting firm. News IS covers the news announcements, business transactions and financial statements of the top 150 or so IT vendors, along with other news of interest to the modern senior IT manager working within data centre technologies. Subscription details here. Related stories Oracle offers up database to the little guys Windows Small Business Server 2003 released to manufacturing
News IS, 02 Nov 2003

IBM offers buy now pay later server deals

IBM has announced a new global offering that allows customers to defer all payments on IBM information technology until 2004, tied to low rate five-year financing deals. The deal is designed to stack business into IBM’s fourth quarter with payment deferred until afterwards. Shipments must be on or prior to December 31. The packages are being marketed under the name of the Power of Zero Plus, and are available on a wide range of IBM hardware and software in most parts of the world. The deal in the US and Canada allows no payment for 90 days, and interest rates set at 3.75 per cent thereafter. The interest rate will vary in different parts of the world. The deal includes purchases of xSeries, iSeries and pSeries eServers and selected zSeries eServer models. It also operates on TotalStorage products, PCs, Retail Store Systems, Printing Systems and any software that IBM charges for on a one-time basis. The offering ends December 31, 2003. You can only finance software if you also buy some hardware in the same transaction. The deferral period is 90 days for October installations, 60 days for November installations and 30 days for December installations. Transaction sizes must be between $25,000 and $1m and PCs and zSeries eServers require special bid approval. The whole package comes from IBM Global Financing. © Copyright 2003 News IS News IS is a weekly newsletter published by Rethink Research, a London-based publishing and consulting firm. News IS covers the news announcements, business transactions and financial statements of the top 150 or so IT vendors, along with other news of interest to the modern senior IT manager working within data centre technologies. Subscription details here. Related stories IBM pounds server rivals in Q3 IBM speeds up low-end server line IBM up and optimistic in Q3
News IS, 02 Nov 2003

Complex tax credits harming technology firms

Complex tax rules are preventing small technology companies from taking advantage of research and development (R&D) tax credits, according to accountancy firm Grant Thornton. The Inland Revenue has launched a consultation document on the tax credits, which are available to “innovative” technology businesses. But many firms, especially sole traders and partnerships, do not qualify for the R&D relief because of the complex rules that surround the tax credits, Grant Thornton says. According to Grant Thornton the Inland Revenue's definition of technology businesses is much too narrow and is damaging many fast-growing start-ups. Alan Boby, tax partner at Grant Thornton, called for the government to improve the value of the tax relief. “Currently, because of the strict definitions and limits applied to the term ‘innovation’, some of the UK’s most technologically forward-thinking companies are missing out. “What’s more, only companies qualify for R&D tax relief. This means that many small to medium sized enterprises, which are set up as sole traders or partnerships, cannot claim this vital financial support. “Ironically, it is just these sorts of organisations that the government claims to want to help most,” he said. Many small firms are also losing out because they have to pay for new software for R&D work, which isn’t covered by the tax relief, according to Grant Thornton It has sent a letter to the Inland Revenue as part of the consultation, calling for action to make the R&D tax credits more attractive to small technology companies. Boby said that the credits’ incentives need to be reviewed to make a “real impact” on businesses in practice. “The government has already acknowledged that take-up of R&D tax credits has not been as high as they hoped. “As a result, they have issued a consultation document and invited comment from the industry. This is an encouraging step forward, however we remain sceptical as to how far they will be prepared to simplify and relax the rules for claimants,” he said. Copyright © 2003,
Startups.co.uk, 02 Nov 2003